CAD and 3d rendering build

tioon

Junior Member
Jul 13, 2018
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Hello all

I need a PC for CAD modeling ( Autodesk Fusion 360, Solidworks ) and 3D rendering (Keyshot). I've made some research and I think I know, more or less, what I need but since it's going to be my first build I would like to hear your opinions, suggestions and overall input.

1. CPU: Ryzen 2700X

I know that CAD software prefers faster cores, instead of more cores/threads so Intel CPU's might seem like a better option but in my case rendering is a priority.

2. CPU COOLING: be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 4 – Will it be sufficient to keep 2700X really cool? Anybody have any experience with this cooler and 8 core ryzen chips?

3. MOBO: Here comes my biggest concern...

I'm gonna use my rendering software for long hours, which means that CPU will work under 100% load on all cores. This is why I would like my motherboard to have decent VRM (to keep things cool and stable) and also be futureproof for the next generation of Zen CPU's.

For years I've been using Asus motherboards and never had any problems with them, so my first pick was Asus Prime X470-PRO. As far as I can tell, it has decent VRM design and is quite affordable. But after I watched buildzoid's test of this board, which included thermal testing, I'm a little bit worried if it can handle the heat during long and heavy workload?

I also considered Asus X470 Strix-F (similar VRM, larger heatsinks) but thermal images that I've found over the internet, show that in harsh conditions it can run pretty hot too. Looking at the pictures in the link below Asrock X470 Taichi seems like the one to go with. But is it really worth stretching my budget? Or maybe I'm already overthinking? Btw. I'm not going to overclock my CPU for now but I would like to make the best use of Ryzen optimalization, auto-boost technologies.

https://imgur.com/r/Amd/yZsgmPq


4. RAM: G.Skill 16GB 3200MHz Flare X Black Ryzen CL14 (2x8GB) F4-3200C14D-16GFX

5. GPU: Msi Gtx 1060 ARMOR 6G OCV1 ( from previous PC )

6. SSD: Crucial MX500 500GB SATA

7. STORAGE: 2 X Seagate 500GB HDD ( from previous PC )

8. PSU: Tagan 600W TG600-U33II ( from previous PC )

9. DISPLAY: EIZO EV2736W 1440p ( from previous PC )

10. CASE: Here I can't decide between Fractal Design Define C and Meshify C. I would prefer the first one since I would like this build to be as quiet as possible (working at home) but the second one will probably have better airflow. In both cases I'm going to add two - be quiet! Silent Wings 3 140mm PWM fans. What kind of temps can I expect? Is Meshify C tolerable in terms of noise levels under full load?



I'm gonna appreciate any tips, suggestions and things to be aware of...
 

Campy

Senior member
Jun 25, 2010
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The X470-F motherboard has 60A power stages, versus the 40A of X470 Pro. I wouldn't have any qualms about using the X470-F, it's a high end motherboard and you shouldn't have any trouble with it even while overclocking, should you decide to do so at a later time.

When it comes to VRM temps airflow will usually solve all your problems anyway, and even though those heatsinks aren't great for heat transfer, they will do a fine job when you have an air cooler moving some air over them in a decently ventilated case. If you're not overclocking, you're definitely overthinking things.

Also here's Buildzoid's roundup video for X470 boards.
 

tioon

Junior Member
Jul 13, 2018
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Thanks a lot for your reply. You calmed me down a bit. So at this point, do you think it's better go with Strix-f or Taichi? Where I live they cost almost exactly the same. The only thing that keeps me away from Asus is some problem with temperature monitoring sensors, described by many owners. Nothing major but the fact that the Asus support can't handle it for couple of months doesn't seem like a fair behavior....
 

Organik

Member
Jul 15, 2018
58
2
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Your wrong. The more cores / threads the faster it will render. For video editing or CAD or 3D. Because if you have a 4.4Ghz and 8 cores and threads, compread to a 3.8Ghz with 16 cores the 3.8Ghz would smash the 4.4Ghz system. Cuz eventually the 4.4 with 8 threads will start to choke. Where as a i9 10 thread or 12 whatever you want once suffocating trys to being another core helps it out,,,,OH FYI if I were you I would consider Titan as a option. I mean these are gaming cards, you want a pro card for Video Editing or 3D or audio workation or PS and what not. I want you to get the 1060 GB for now then in a few months sell it and buy the 1180 GTX. Because when the 1180 GTX comes out you will not be happy you have a 1080 GTX. So pay 300 dollars and buy a 1060 then sell it and get a 1180 GTX. This is not a good time to spend 500 dollars on a 10xx series card. since the new generation is coming. But still I would go with a workstation Titan card. Because it sounds serious what you do. Games dont care about threads, they want single thread performance. But Im here to say 3.8GB or 4.4Ghz you will not really see a difference unless you benchmark.
 
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Campy

Senior member
Jun 25, 2010
785
171
116
Thanks a lot for your reply. You calmed me down a bit. So at this point, do you think it's better go with Strix-f or Taichi? Where I live they cost almost exactly the same. The only thing that keeps me away from Asus is some problem with temperature monitoring sensors, described by many owners. Nothing major but the fact that the Asus support can't handle it for couple of months doesn't seem like a fair behavior....
Between those two boards I'd probably get the Taichi, I believe it's the higher end board and slightly better on the hardware side of things, VRM included. BIOS may be a bit more clunky, but since you don't plan on playing around with it a lot I don't think that should be the deciding factor. At least ASRock BIOS isn't known for having bugs and quirks like for instance MSI.

I have not heard of that problem for Asus boards before, but I can see how it would not inspire confidence.
 
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Cerb

Elite Member
Aug 26, 2000
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1. The big CAD programs get optimized for Intel, so the i7-8700K will be faster than differences in other programs make it seem, but it's not usually that important, if you're not running batch script jobs, or imports/exports, too much. It's going to be rare today to become purely CPU-bound in AutoCAD or SolidWorks, except when you're doing something that causes you to need to walk away for a bit even on a very expensive HEDT Intel rig. So, if you bought an i7-8700K instead, it would be a bit faster in the CAD programs, but the raw core count and overall value of the R7 2700X is still very good, and will usually do better at parallel tasks like CPU renderings. But, if you're running a rendering on code that uses AVX2, the Intel will beat the AMD even with fewer cores, typically. IMO, you won't go wrong with either one, especially having a focus on the rendering.

2. No direct experience, but reviews don't put the 2700X as using any excessive amount of power. We've been cooling CPUs that get hotter, and need to dump more heat out, than it does, for a long time.

...

7. I'd just get new, personally. A used 500GB is likely to be much less dense (and slower) than current gens, and HDDs are pretty cheap.
 
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tioon

Junior Member
Jul 13, 2018
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The more cores / threads the faster it will render.
I completely agree and never claimed otherwise.
In CAD however - Fusion 360 to be specific - I've read that more cores don't improve the performance since the software does not utilize them. Simply, some operations have to be done one after another and so the whole process can not be split and processed simultaneously. However when it comes to CAD I usually don't work with extremely complex models so I guess it will be fine. Rendering is a priority for me. Also thanks for your notice on GPU. However I already own GTX 1060, since I have bought it couple years ago, so for now it'll have to do the job. Will wait for the next gen of GPUS and price drops... hopefully...

I'd just get new, personally. A used 500GB is likely to be much less dense (and slower) than current gens, and HDDs are pretty cheap.
Thanks for a tip. I didn't think those things get so much slower over time. I thought about getting NVME in couple of months and going with full ssd system - 500GB NVMe as a main system drive and 500 GB sata ssd as a storage + external HDD for backups.
 

Organik

Member
Jul 15, 2018
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The 1060 will improve your rendering time. Imagine what a 1180 could do. When the time is right and 1180 is out, sell your 1060 if its 6GB for 180 to 200 dollars. Then buy a 700 dollar 1180.
 

Organik

Member
Jul 15, 2018
58
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For CAD modeling and 3D rendering, shouldn't you be going for 32GB of memory instead of 16?
IMO 16GB is minimum for a Windows 10 machine. For audio production you need 64GB ram. So it all matters what hes doing and what app hes doing it in.

If hes a hard core CAD and what not then he needs 32GB of RAM,, end of story. 16GB is for people who dont use those pro apps but they use the heck out fo desktop. Bunch of hardcore apps open at same time. But if its any time of pro or semi pro work with video editing or CAD or Studio Max or Maya then you , like I said need 32GB
 
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