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Discussion Buyer beware. AMD.com sold Radeon VII only come with 1 year warranty + highly restrictive

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UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
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Quality parts always always always had quality warranties.

If you buy a cheap Vizio TV from Walmart you will get a 1 year warranty. If you buy a Samsung TV from Best Buy you will get a better extended warranty.
Wut? o_O

I bought a Samsung TV at Best Buy before, and it comes with the exact same warranty as a Vizio..........unless you pay extra and buy an extended warranty from Best Buy. It's the same exact thing buying a TV from really any place including Walmart, Target, etc. (outside of Costco who give an extra year warranty).
 

Kenmitch

Diamond Member
Oct 10, 1999
8,427
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Wut? o_O

I bought a Samsung TV at Best Buy before, and it comes with the exact same warranty as a Vizio..........unless you pay extra and buy an extended warranty from Best Buy. It's the same exact thing buying a TV from really any place including Walmart, Target, etc. (outside of Costco who give an extra year warranty).
Yep. 1 year is the norm now it looks like. Even the high dollar ones i looked at.
 

DeathReborn

Platinum Member
Oct 11, 2005
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The EU has a 2 year minimum warranty for electrical goods, this extends to components of said goods (GPU's, CPU's etc), which might be part of the reason AMD don't sell direct, they direct you to a retailer over on this side of the pond.
 

Stuka87

Diamond Member
Dec 10, 2010
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Quality parts always always always had quality warranties.

If you buy a cheap Vizio TV from Walmart you will get a 1 year warranty. If you buy a Samsung TV from Best Buy you will get a better extended warranty.
I think you have that backwards. Vizio's are better than the overpriced junk Samsung puts out. Although in reality, they have identical warranties.
 
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Sathsayin

Junior Member
Feb 11, 2009
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Okay this forum Is quite OLD but if a mod reads this. I need you to skim back through the pages. Its only 4. You will see its worth reviving as thier are still ongoing warranties

Its been quite awhile and time has painted a picture of what really happend.

1617197281320.png
5 months into the production they stopped. There were rumors that some models got issues with the BGA soldering of the chips! Now lets look at the warrantys that were given at the time of release!

1617197347441.png

Amd giving an implied modified warranty. They can only really do this according to the magnuson moss warranty act if they state it and you agree to it prior to buying. Otherwise IMPLIED Full warranty is assumed. AS you can see... the products vendors were buying from AMD were assumed FULL warranty merchantbility. Meaning that they all under common business practices agreed to have 2-3 year warranties!!! Basicly the vendors in good faith gave full warrantys! The Manufacturer of the CHIPS themselves.. AMD sold thesechips to be BGA'd by the vendors and then AMD made some to sell themselves with less warranty.

The fact they discontinued after 5 months allows you to know they had production issues regardless. The fact they only offered a 1 year warranty while leaving other vendors they sold chips too 3 year warrantys on thier VGA cards lets you know this was decietful! IMHO they left the VGA vendors without enough stock to actually replacea card if they couldnt repair it after a reasonable number of attempts! Usually 3. Its the Consumers choice if they want a repaired card are a refund. NOT the vendors. Most vendors know this and try to justgive a refund. If a person knows the law they say I want a card. The vendors have to give them EQUAL or better! Well in most cases they cave them cards with 1/2 floating point performance on OPENCL compute and a Rebate. Which is what the VII was meant for really. NOT Mining but rendering/compute/some gameing etc. It was an all around beast of a card that they coudlnt replace. Amd didnt manufacture them long enough do to problems.

In MY opinon the vendors all got ripped off. Why? because logically they gave 1 year warrantys... during production... they knew they were gonna ramp down production.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
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3. Its the Consumers choice if they want a repaired card are a refund. NOT the vendors. Most vendors know this and try to justgive a refund. If a person knows the law they say I want a card. The vendors have to give them EQUAL or better!
This, AFAIK, is NOT true. There is no provision in the US Law that you can "force" a card (or other item out of a vendor), instead of accepting a refund. Especially if there is none. I look forward to seeing you try to litigate that point.
 

Sathsayin

Junior Member
Feb 11, 2009
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0
66
warranties are transferable, don’t limit implied warranties or require the consumer to pay any fees to obtain service (such as shipping charges), and give customers the option of a replacement or full refund after a reasonable number of failed repair attempts. In Gpu's its tied to the serial not the original purchaser. Implied warranties can change this however. If its not implied as far as i know its full warranty. Which means product tied to the serial.


At the discretion of the customer! the Customers have the option.

Also

Tie-in sales provisions require customers to buy products or services from a particular company to maintain warranty coverage. They’re generally prohibited. (ever had a graphic card say they are gonna give you a refund of MSRP if they run out of cards and cant repair it in the actual warranty?) No.. they usually ask you can wave rights.. THEY AHVE TO ASK YOU.

Meaning they have to give you a card of equal value free and clear. IF THEY FORCE YOU TO TAKE A REFUND and the current cost of a card is sold by them higher then the MSRP or cost you paid and you cant replace it. Then you have grounds to sue in small claims and ask in your original petition for court costs. ALSO... you dont have to be in thier jurisdiction... part A


(d)Civil action by consumer for damages, etc.; jurisdiction; recovery of costs and expenses; cognizable claims
(1)Subject to subsections (a)(3) and (e), a consumer who is damaged by the failure of a supplier, warrantor, or service contractor to comply with any obligation under this chapter, or under a written warranty, implied warranty, or service contract, may bring suit for damages and other legal and equitable relief—
-------->>>(A)in any court of competent jurisdiction in any State or the District of Columbia; or
(B)in an appropriate district court of the United States, subject to paragraph (3) of this subsection.


A call to the attorney general and the FTC would highly expedite things....

There are a lot of things youcan learn if you read online.

15 U.S. Code § 2308 - Implied warranties
U.S. Code
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(a)Restrictions on disclaimers or modifications
No supplier may disclaim or modify (except as provided in subsection (b)) any implied warranty to a consumer with respect to such consumer product if (1) such supplier makes any written warranty to the consumer with respect to such consumer Product, or (2) at the time of sale, or within 90 days thereafter, such supplier enters into a service contract with the consumer which applies to such consumer product.

(b)Limitation on duration
For purposes of this chapter (other than section 2304(a)(2) of this title), implied warranties may be limited in duration to the duration of a written warranty of reasonable duration, if such limitation is conscionable and is set forth in clear and unmistakable language and prominently displayed on the face of the warranty.

(c)Effectiveness of disclaimers, modifications, or limitations
A disclaimer, modification, or limitation made in violation of this section shall be ineffective for purposes of this chapter and State law.

(Pub. L. 93–637, title I, § 108, Jan. 4, 1975, 88 Stat. 2189.)


Also if an RMA'd card ... breaks your pc...

• Consequential or incidental damages are losses caused by a defective product. One example would be the cost of food that was ruined because of a defective refrigerator. You might be able to claim these, especially in states with strong consumer protection laws.

I suggest always recording you opening the package and putting in the card.. and testing it working.



Laws give you more rights
If you discover that something you bought is defective, contact the retailer and manufacturer to ask for a repair, replacement, or refund.
Along with companies’ express warranties, you also have “implied warranties” under state law. The Uniform Commercial Code, a set of laws adopted in much the same form by all states and the District of Columbia, provides an automatic “implied warranty of merchantability.” That unwritten protection guarantees that consumer products are free of substantial defects and will function properly for a reasonable period of time. What’s “reasonable” depends on the type of product and the amount you paid. States typically limit implied warranties to four years.

As a fair rule of thumb ...look at all the vendors average warranties for 2-3 years vs 1 year from amd on the Radeon VII

Credit-card warranties. Many credit and some debit cards extend the manufacturer’s written warranty, usually for up to one year, on most products you buy using the card.
ALWAYS BUYYOUR GPU ON A CREDIT CARD!!!

The Uniform Commercial Code, fully adopted by most states, stipulates that most new consumer products come not only with an express warranty, but also with a so-called implied warranty of merchantability. That is an automatic, unwritten promise that your purchase will perform as commonly expected, including that it will last a reasonable amount of time given the nature of the item. In most states, implied warranties are in effect for four years, although that doesn't necessarily mean a product must last that long. Implied warranties apply to retailers and manufacturers and may be broader than an express warranty.

The fact that parts are no longer available for a product with a valid warranty does not relieve the company's responsibility to fulfill the terms. IF they give a 3 year warranty on the outside of the box. ... then on the inside after you purchase it say somehting diffrent you should take it back.

IF anything is diffrent then here it was usually an accepted warranty you waved rights to laws with at purchase.for example non-transferable warranty etc.

Not a lawyer.. btw. Just read alot online.
 
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Hitman928

Diamond Member
Apr 15, 2012
3,493
3,758
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Did you actually buy a Radeon VII and run into this issue or are you ranting just to rant?

As far as implied warranty goes, it doesn't matter when the express warranty covers the terms of the implied warranty. For example, in California:

(c) The duration of the implied warranty of merchantability and where present the implied warranty of fitness shall be coextensive in duration with an express warranty which accompanies the consumer goods, provided the duration of the express warranty is reasonable; but in no event shall such implied warranty have a duration of less than 60 days nor more than one year following the sale of new consumer goods to a retail buyer.
So AMD's warranty already meets the implied warranty's duration requirement. Other states have less duration requirements. There was no tie-in sale requirement for the Radeon VII so I don't know why you even brought that up. Transferrable warranties are quite rare for computer parts, maybe EVGA still offers them? Pretty sure no one else does and they don't have to, there's no law requiring it as long as they don't list their warranty as a 'full warranty'. There is nothing illegal or shady about AMD's warranty as it is properly labeled as a 'limited warranty'. Does it meet the typical GPU warranty length provided by AIB partners? No. But the solution to that is pretty simple, don't buy from AMD direct if you want a longer warranty. Pretty simple.

Obviously different countries have different laws about this stuff and you'll have to check your local laws if outside the U.S.
 
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