Blue Screen of Death after cleaning the dust on PC

Bring_us_the_girl

Junior Member
Feb 17, 2019
4
0
6
I have this PC for about 2 years, never have any issue.
I took him to clean the dust in a store (never cleaned him in those 2 years).

Then, when the PC was cleaned, he started to have randomly BSoD,
sometimes after 10 minutes turned on, sometimes after 10 hours.

The BSoD error is "UNEXPECTED_STORE_EXCEPTION" (about 7 times this one).

and one time CRITICAL_PROCESS_DIED after two blue screens in a row.

I already tested the HDD with Crystal Disk Info, and the program say the HDD is "GOOD".

What it could be?

(And always, sorry for the bad english).
 

DownTheSky

Senior member
Apr 7, 2013
642
51
91
It's either the RAM or the CPU. Take out the RAM and look for dust in the ram slots. Clean the slots and put the RAM back. If you still get BSOD take out the cpu and look for dust. Most likely they just used compressed air and didn't take anything apart. Some dust could have gone in the wrong places.
 
Jun 19, 2004
23,530
1,189
126
I have this PC for about 2 years, never have any issue.
I took him to clean the dust in a store (never cleaned him in those 2 years).

Then, when the PC was cleaned, he started to have randomly BSoD,
sometimes after 10 minutes turned on, sometimes after 10 hours.

The BSoD error is "UNEXPECTED_STORE_EXCEPTION" (about 7 times this one).

and one time CRITICAL_PROCESS_DIED after two blue screens in a row.

I already tested the HDD with Crystal Disk Info, and the program say the HDD is "GOOD".

What it could be?

(And always, sorry for the bad english).
Try reseating ram and gpu. Try different psu. Stop taking computer to store to be cleaned. Buy a can of air yourself.
 
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Bring_us_the_girl

Junior Member
Feb 17, 2019
4
0
6
Try reseating ram and gpu. Try different psu. Stop taking computer to store to be cleaned. Buy a can of air yourself.
I did this, and everything seems normal, but i don't have certain yet, last time the computer took 10 hours to have BSoD.

And yes, i regret taking the computer to the store, i was afraid to do something wrong because this PC was expensive and i had no balls to clean myself. Lesson learned.

What else could be?
 
Jun 19, 2004
23,530
1,189
126
I did this, and everything seems normal, but i don't have certain yet, last time the computer took 10 hours to have BSoD.

And yes, i regret taking the computer to the store, i was afraid to do something wrong because this PC was expensive and i had no balls to clean myself. Lesson learned.

What else could be?
One step at a time. Eliminate and consolidate. If reseating components doesn't work. Try a different psu.
 

ericlp

Diamond Member
Dec 24, 2000
6,022
166
106
Could be a loose cable to a hard drive or motherboard. Push on all the power cables, fan headers, data cables...You never know what some tech might have done. I've heard of people bringing systems in... only to find the computer store employee swapped customers good ram with bad sticks. Rare for sure, but maybe go over your system really well, make sure you got all the parts back to as when you took it in. Some computer places are really shaddy. Also check fans, and cpu temps... Job security 101!
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
13,015
2,689
136
@Bring_us_the_girl if you ever want to clean your own PC, I highly recommend getting one of these:

https://www.metrovacworld.com/product/DataVac_Electric_Duster/overview

If you're paranoid about static, you can get the ESD version:

https://www.metrovacworld.com/product/DataVac_ESD_Safe_Electric_Duster/overview

I was able to get the first version for less than $99.99 (think I got mine for around $55). It has performed quite well for me on multiple occasions when cleaning my computer, various dGPUs, PSUs, and other things. Canned air was a major letdown.
 
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Bring_us_the_girl

Junior Member
Feb 17, 2019
4
0
6
Could be a loose cable to a hard drive or motherboard. Push on all the power cables, fan headers, data cables...You never know what some tech might have done. I've heard of people bringing systems in... only to find the computer store employee swapped customers good ram with bad sticks. Rare for sure, but maybe go over your system really well, make sure you got all the parts back to as when you took it in. Some computer places are really shaddy. Also check fans, and cpu temps... Job security 101!
Wow, i didn't think they would do that (i use that store for years), but who knows.

Gonna check that.
 

Bring_us_the_girl

Junior Member
Feb 17, 2019
4
0
6
@Bring_us_the_girl if you ever want to clean your own PC, I highly recommend getting one of these:

https://www.metrovacworld.com/product/DataVac_Electric_Duster/overview

If you're paranoid about static, you can get the ESD version:

https://www.metrovacworld.com/product/DataVac_ESD_Safe_Electric_Duster/overview

I was able to get the first version for less than $99.99 (think I got mine for around $55). It has performed quite well for me on multiple occasions when cleaning my computer, various dGPUs, PSUs, and other things. Canned air was a major letdown.
Is this really better than the other methods? Seems interesting.

Other question, when i should clean the dust of my PC?
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
13,015
2,689
136
Is this really better than the other methods? Seems interesting.

Other question, when i should clean the dust of my PC?
If you already have a compressor with attachments, you can use that to clean out your PC. That's all the DataVac really is . . . just a compressor that blows a lot of air. I find that canned air only performs well for a few seconds before it gets really cold. You start getting condensation on the can, which is not such a good thing. It also starts to lose pressure quickly, and the initial pressure isn't all that great anyway. If you have caked-on dust, you need a lot of pressure to get that stuff off the surface.

As to when you should do it, that's up to you. Some computers without many fans accumulate dust slowly. Mine builds up dust quickly since it moves quite a bit of air (well over 100 cfm, it's loud). Whenever I service something inside it or replace a component, I take the opportunity to remove dust buildup.
 

ehume

Golden Member
Nov 6, 2009
1,427
50
91
Is this really better than the other methods? Seems interesting.

Other question, when I should clean the dust of my PC?
DataVac is a fine blower. I have had mine for seven years. Very glad to have it. You should see it take on the dust from our birds!
 

ehume

Golden Member
Nov 6, 2009
1,427
50
91
https://www.amazon.com/Metro-Vacuum-ED500P-500-Watt-Electric/dp/B001U899HQ/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1550506388&sr=8-4&keywords=datavac+500
Use this or one like it, I do. With a $5 attachment to blow air, it will clean you PC like nobodys business.

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA10Z1AU6992&Description=air compressor&cm_re=air_compressor-_-0MH-000M-00024-_-Product

I do all the time, and use it for many more uses,.
I agree that as a compressor it looks fine. The Datavac link is https://www.amazon.com/Metro-Vacuum-ED500P-500-Watt-Electric/dp/B001U899HQ/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1550506388&sr=8-4&keywords=datavac+500 at Amazon. Back when I got mine, it was not as well known, cost only $45. For dusting, I find the middle nozzle works best, but YMMV.
 

LTC8K6

Lifer
Mar 10, 2004
28,523
1,565
126
What can happen with air blowing is damage to fans by overspeeding them.

If you don't hold the blades still, the high pressure air can spin them way past their design limits.

One other problem with compressed air is moisture. Compressed air lines or tanks can have moisture in them, which can get driven into your computer.
You should let the compressed air blow for a few seconds, to clear out any moisture in the lines, before using it on the computer.
 
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ehume

Golden Member
Nov 6, 2009
1,427
50
91
What can happen with air blowing is damage to fans by overspeeding them.

If you don't hold the blades still, the high pressure air can spin them way past their design limits.

One other problem with compressed air is moisture. Compressed air lines or tanks can have moisture in them, which can get driven into your computer.
You should let the compressed air blow for a few seconds, to clear out any moisture in the lines, before using it on the computer.
About 50 years ago my job was to open up an industrial shop. The exit lines were always at the bottom of the compressed air tank, so the first task with them was to exhaust the accumulated moisture that had condensed to liquid water. Nothing has changed that.

As for overspeeding fans, wooden skewer sticks or fireplace matchsticks or chopsticks, when inserted into fans, stops the blades from turning.

Good pickups/warnings.
 

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