Blu-Ray internal pc player/burner with built-in upscaling!

Harry_Wild

Senior member
Dec 14, 2012
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I am thinking about upgrading my internal dvd burner to a Blu-Ray dvd player or burner. I am using it most to play standard definition dvds with a 4K monitor. Do any of the PC internal dvd players/burners come with a built-in upscaling feature like that of the separate 4K or Blu-Ray DVD players that are for TVs sets?
 

Kartajan

Golden Member
Feb 26, 2001
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That would be a function implemented in software vice hardware when dealing with a PC.
For example, PowerDVD 15 Ultra will do what you want.
 

Harry_Wild

Senior member
Dec 14, 2012
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That would be a function implemented in software vice hardware when dealing with a PC.
For example, PowerDVD 15 Ultra will do what you want.
That is great news! I have PowerDVD 12 already and the current version is 17. So can I still use my standard ordinary non blu-ray dvd and use PowerDVD 15 or 17 and it will upscale my 480i content to 1080p?
 
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Kartajan

Golden Member
Feb 26, 2001
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It will upscale; that does NOT mean that 480i will look good...

pixel count makes a lot of difference- thus the reason I bought almost all my DVD's again in BluRay...
 

Harry_Wild

Senior member
Dec 14, 2012
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It will upscale; that does NOT mean that 480i will look good...

pixel count makes a lot of difference- thus the reason I bought almost all my DVD's again in BluRay...
Oh! Well, I decided to wait till technology makes it possible to upscale 480i content to 1080p quality that is equivalent Blu-Ray discs.

Thanks for the info. Now I can move on!:D
 

Kartajan

Golden Member
Feb 26, 2001
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Oh! Well, I decided to wait till technology makes it possible to upscale 480i content to 1080p quality that is equivalent Blu-Ray discs.

Thanks for the info. Now I can move on!:D
You do know that that day will never come, right? Upscaled 480i will never look as good as real 1080p...
 
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jkauff

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Oct 4, 2012
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You do know that that day will never come, right? Upscaled 480i will never look as good as real 1080p...
Quite true. It's possible to make that happen, though, using Handbrake to convert to x264 480p, then using a player that offers madVR support. madVR upscaling algorithms can easily make 480p look as good as 1080p.
 

Kartajan

Golden Member
Feb 26, 2001
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Quite true. It's possible to make that happen, though, using Handbrake to convert to x264 480p, then using a player that offers madVR support. madVR upscaling algorithms can easily make 480p look as good as 1080p.
Where I can agree that a top flight algorithm can do a bang up job - and get very close with the right content - , I would still maintain that real 1080p is better looking....
 
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HutchinsonJC

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Apr 15, 2007
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Fine details are outright lost comparing something 480p to 1080p. 1080p (1920x1080) is 6x the pixels of 480p (720x480). And it's a bigger jump if you're using 640x480 as a reference point.

A really good algorithm might be able to do some really good anti-aliasing, but there's no way for it to take something from 480p and make it look like a 1080p source.

The 480p upconversion process has to take each and every single pixel on the screen, and some how spit out 6 pixels in place of it. Fine details can't be extracted out of that. A lot of details like sand, gravel, small text, pours on a face, etc simply can't be regained in the upconversion process.

If an algorithm were designed to detect a face, and reconstruct the face with pours and fine hair etc, the reconstruction may look good, but it will not match the original because it's using its own programming to reconstruct something and not the source.

If the comparison is cell shaded 480p to 1080p, then I reckon there'd be pretty minimal difference between the 480p upconverted to 1080p, and a 1080p source, but that's just the nature of cell shaded material (cartoony material).

When I've encoded cartoony material, I've always found I've been able to get away with significantly less resolution and still be satisfied with the result.
 

jkauff

Senior member
Oct 4, 2012
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Fine details are outright lost comparing something 480p to 1080p. 1080p (1920x1080) is 6x the pixels of 480p (720x480). And it's a bigger jump if you're using 640x480 as a reference point.

A really good algorithm might be able to do some really good anti-aliasing, but there's no way for it to take something from 480p and make it look like a 1080p source.
Well, certainly not like a high-bitrate Blu-ray source, but as good as a downscaled x264 1080p source. In any case, madVR upscaling algorithms are far superior to anything built into a player or TV.
 
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PeterScott

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Jul 7, 2017
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Well, certainly not like a high-bitrate Blu-ray source, but as good as a downscaled x264 1080p source. In any case, madVR upscaling algorithms are far superior to anything built into a player or TV.
I have been seeing claims about magical up-scaling since the early days of Digital Cameras, when we had 2MP or less cameras, so up-scaling for printing was a big deal.

Alternate scaling methods (to good old bicubic) tend to be combination of snake oil and placebo affect (mixed with some sharpening and contrast applied).

Proper up-scaling is trivial. Bicubic is generally the least artifact inducing option which it is why Photoshop still uses and not some fad filter of the moment.

The reason people get excited by alternate scaling is that they introduce sharpening into the process automatically, so they think it looks sharper so it's scaling better.

I have yet to see any of these magic scalers. Do anything that bicubic and a bit of sharpening couldn't.
 

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