Bizarre internet download speed

Discussion in 'Networking' started by Bernardg, Nov 9, 2012.

  1. Bernardg

    Bernardg Member

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    I have a computer connected to the router by wire that downloads at 13 Mbps while it uploads at 3.4 Mbps. Another computer is connected to the router with an electric line connection Netgear XET101. That connection is rated up to 85 Mbps. The second computer connected with Netgear downloads at 2.3 or sometimes 0.3 Mpbs and uploads at 3.4 Mbps.

    I cannot understand what can impact the download speed like that. Can some good soul give me a hint of where to look for a problem?

    Thanks in advance
    Bernardg
     
  2. Fardringle

    Fardringle Diamond Member

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    If your house has bad or insufficient electrical wiring, then devices like the Netgear XET101 will not work very well. It's the same issue as using bad ethernet cables for regular wired connections, or having a lot of wireless interference nearby for wireless devices.

    It's also possible that the XET101 is simply bad, or there is something wrong with the second computer. Try connecting that one at the location of the first computer and see what speeds it gets there.
     
  3. JackMDS

    JackMDS Super Moderator<BR>Elite Member
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    If the Powerline connection is a real overall Good solution in Networking.

    As compare to the WIFI, it will Not have only 1% market share.


    :cool:
     
    #3 JackMDS, Nov 9, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2012
  4. AnonymouseUser

    AnonymouseUser Diamond Member

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    If you can switch the network connection between the computers you can determine if your computer or network is faulty.
     
  5. Cabletek

    Cabletek Member

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    I have never seen one that says its designed to go across circuits, so if you switch the breakers in your panel, can you find ONE breaker that turns off both outlets, if not you have gone past the intended use of said device.

    No one uses dial up anymore either but it used to be the defacto standard, and then there was ISDN [rasafrackin no good long eared galloots, thats right looney toons still rules it all].

    If you took a few UTP [or coax for that matter I love seeing sparkies do this since it worked for phone right?] cables, stripped them and twisted them together with wire nuts instead of using a switch how do you think that would work out? That's kind of what you do when you go across circuits. You add impurities, changes in impedance, etc. that it was not tested or designed around. It may work, you may only loose some bandwidth it may also crap out and give you 75% packet loss. Its kind of like using non ANSI standard/ kerrigan and ritchine [K&R] C programming techniques, never ask about that in the C newsgroup for the love of god NEVER. Or from any unix programmer. sheesh.

    And next you 'll quote powerline ISP tech but that was never really going to take off due to cost and restrictions power companies have on profiting, increases in charges, etc... plus the additional costs to maintain the lines with more zeal on RFI issues.
     
  6. Bernardg

    Bernardg Member

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    You basically told me to forget about powerline transmission. I was not convinced that it was the problem because the upload speed was normal.

    After reviewing your comments, I moved the computer and connected it directly to the router. Well, well, as you expected, the problem was coming from the Netgear powerline equipment. I am buying a powerful router to reach the far corner of my house.

    Thanks a lot for your inputs.

    Bernardg
     
  7. JackMDS

    JackMDS Super Moderator<BR>Elite Member
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    WIFI is not just about pieces of Hardware, it is highly depended on Environmental variables.

    The same Wireless Router can work well in one type of Environment and be a &#8220;Dud&#8221; in another. Most Environmental variables like, Apartment/House general layout, walls and their inner/outer structure, electrical Noises, furniture size and their placement, etc. cannot be (or it is very hard) controlled.

    Thus, in many cases there is No Magic Wireless Router that can cover whatever One desires.

    ----------------
    In general.

    The best way is to lay a CAT6 cable to central locations in the house that is close to the destination Wireless client and install an Access Point, or Cable/DSL Router configured as an Access Points. Then connect it to the Main Router.

    Using Access Points or Wireless Cable/DSL Routers as a Switch with an Access Point - http://www.ezlan.net/router_AP.html

    You do not want/can not/hate/your client hate to lay Cables.Start with One affordable Wireless Router that can do WDS (the reason to start with WDS capable Router is that in case you need to add more Wireless WDS hardware the original Router has to support it).


    Start with One affordable Wireless Router that can do WDS (the reason to start with WDS capable Router is that in case you need to add more Wireless WDS hardware the original Router has to support it). If you are lucky your environment is conducive to get covered with one Good Wireless Router, you are done.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_distribution_system

    Due to the added flexibility, it is a better solution to choose Routers that can work with the free 3rd party firmware DD-WRT

    http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

    http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/WDS_Linked_router_network

    Using a Laptop loaded with Wirelessnetview, do a Wireless survey, http://majorgeeks.com/WirelessNetView_d6102.html

    According to the signal strength reading, identify spots that have strong signal, and spots with weak or No signal.

    Repeaters have to be put in places that have relatively strong signal and are in proximity of the "dead" areas.

    How many WDS units are needed? It depends on your specific environment. It is a good idea to start with one additional unit, try it, and decide on the Next step according to the outcome.

    ------------
    Good Wireless Routers that can be flashed with DD-WRT and be configured as main Wireless Router, Access Point, or Repeater.

    Money is Not an issue. Asus RT-N66U -RT-N66U

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16833320091

    Best value for the price. Cisco E4200 refurb.

    http://homestore.cisco.com/en-us/Ro...-router_stcVVproductId133604734VVviewprod.htm

    I want sub $100 and new (I am allergic to refurb.) Buffalo WZR-HP-AG300H

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16833162047

    -------------------
    All the above are Dual Radio, Giga Switch, and has USB port for NAS.

    They are very good with their stock firmware but also can be flashed with DD-WRT in case that special additional features are needed.

    ---------------

    I want less expensive good Wireless and Giga, but I do not care about Dual Radio and NAS.

    Buffalo WZR-HP-G300NH, currently $47 after Rebate.

    http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16833162031

    --------------

    I want to spend less and do not care about Giga, and NAS, but need good Wireless.

    This is decent Wireless Router with Dual radio.

    Cisco E2500 refurb. $35.

    http://homestore.cisco.com/en-us/Ro...-Router_stcVVproductId138177695VVviewprod.htm



    :cool:
     
  8. Bernardg

    Bernardg Member

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    Jack,

    Thank you for your good material. I bought a SUS RT-N66U for $160 -- it is expensive but it works. No more repeaters or powerlines. Alleluia.

    Bernardg