Question Big oversize PSU pay off? (my x3 1600W working since 2006)

RFC Rudel

Member
Oct 19, 2005
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My x3 1600W working since 2006, it have benn used in the most demanding setups (2 dual gpu), 7 scsi disck,raid card, plus oc.
I open it 2 times to clean it, fans still work. it always work in a dust filter based case notmaly with AC on the room.
since 2010 the setups where ultra but not more than 2 gpus and HDs where migrated to ssd and only mechnical for storage.
I buy it becouse I know it was server based hardware,and I always oversize the psu size, here the current is 220v, relative steady.

So who has similar expirience? have oversize psu have lasted longer?
 

Tech Junky

Golden Member
Jan 27, 2022
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I always recommend oversizing the PSU as it puts less strain on it under load and offers room to grow into it since they last a decade or more. I use an 850W as my cutoff due to the prices doubling beyond that typically. I've run dual GPU's as well on occasion and 850W handled it just fine. With newer GPU's pushing 600W though in the near future 850W wouldn't be enough but, I don't typically run a GPU in my system as a server / headless setup.
 

mindless1

Diamond Member
Aug 11, 2001
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Yes they tend to last longer, but if you're paying twice as much but not getting double the lifespan, or it isn't as efficient at the average load of the system so you're paying more for power year after year, then it may be a false economy.

Like Tech Junky, I find the sweet spot to be 850W or lower, providing the peak (average not momentary) power is ~600W or lower.
 

Fallen Kell

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
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I've been using between 850 - 1000W PSUs for my main gaming/everyday rig for close to 20 years now. The problem (at least in the USA) with going much higher is that you need to know if your system is on a dedicated circuit with no other outlets connected to it, otherwise you risk tripping the breaker. Most home wiring is rated for 15amp @ ~110V so having a 1200W PSU even titanium rated will be pulling around 1333 W from the wall, which is over 11amps. Now if you have 220V (or ran 220V in your home for computer use), the PSU is more efficient, only pulling around 1277 W from the wall for that same titanium rating.
 
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mindless1

Diamond Member
Aug 11, 2001
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^ but but but... ;) This is a topic about Big Oversize PSU, so if a 1500W PSU Is a big oversize, probably enough margin at 110V as long as there's nothing else especially high power running simultaneously, though personally if I had 1000W of system creating heat, then I'd want a dedicated room A/C to remove that and then say 5K BTU is going to draw ~4A more.
 

HardWarrior

Diamond Member
Jan 26, 2004
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My x3 1600W working since 2006, it have benn used in the most demanding setups (2 dual gpu), 7 scsi disck,raid card, plus oc.
I open it 2 times to clean it, fans still work. it always work in a dust filter based case notmaly with AC on the room.
since 2010 the setups where ultra but not more than 2 gpus and HDs where migrated to ssd and only mechnical for storage.
I buy it becouse I know it was server based hardware,and I always oversize the psu size, here the current is 220v, relative steady.

So who has similar expirience? have oversize psu have lasted longer?
I've used a 1200W Corsair AX1200i PSU for 2 years with 0 problems while supporting a WC'd gamer rig with 12-fans. With lower wattage/cheaper PSU's my wife has developed an uncanny ability to sense when one was about to go pear shaped. 😁 We've had some brown-outs lately, but I have an adequate APC unit now which makes things even more stable/smooth.
 

HardWarrior

Diamond Member
Jan 26, 2004
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I've been using between 850 - 1000W PSUs for my main gaming/everyday rig for close to 20 years now. The problem (at least in the USA) with going much higher is that you need to know if your system is on a dedicated circuit with no other outlets connected to it, otherwise you risk tripping the breaker. Most home wiring is rated for 15amp @ ~110V so having a 1200W PSU even titanium rated will be pulling around 1333 W from the wall, which is over 11amps. Now if you have 220V (or ran 220V in your home for computer use), the PSU is more efficient, only pulling around 1277 W from the wall for that same titanium rating.
Good break-down! Thanks loads.
 

biostud

Lifer
Feb 27, 2003
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The question is, why shouldn’t a PSU last very long? The PSU in my receiver is more than 20 years old. I don’t believe it has anything to do about oversizing, but good build quality. We have just come to term with electronics being of crappy quality, not lasting more than 10 years.
 
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mindless1

Diamond Member
Aug 11, 2001
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^ But is that receiver using a SMPS? It makes a difference whether it's 100/120Hz (rectified mains) linear unregulated PSU that most old receivers used, or a few hundred KHz on a computer PSU.

Then there's the load, my most used system is on 24/7 and even if a fairly low wattage (let's say 70W average) there's no way I'd have an (audio?) receiver as high as 70W 24/7. Any sound system I have, probably doesn't average 5W 24/7.

I agree that quality has something to do with it, but then someone buys quality and states it's 12 years old and the more popular reply to whether they should keep using it is no. Granted it often has to do with the value of the components it's powering, like "time for an upgrade" so risking hundreds in new parts vs only another $100-something for new PSU.

Why the lifespan though, there is some science to it. Look at capacitor datasheets, even from high quality ones, they tend to be rated in the ballpark of 5-10 thousand hours. That is at their max specs so will last quite a bit longer with lower ripple current and temperature, but 10K hrs isn't much more than a year. Even so, the typical computer SMPS puts some of the caps at a higher % of their limits than a linear audio PSU does.

I mention capacitors because I find them to be the most common, early failure point. Take the same family of cap (all else equal as much as the designs allow) and put it in a consumer/home-use audio amp, and it would typically last a lot longer than in a computer PSU.
 

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
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The problem (at least in the USA) with going much higher is that you need to know if your system is on a dedicated circuit with no other outlets connected to it, otherwise you risk tripping the breaker. Most home wiring is rated for 15amp @ ~110V so having a 1200W PSU even titanium rated will be pulling around 1333 W from the wall, which is over 11amps.
in that case the PSU wouldn't be bigly oversized, it'd be the correct size.
 

Golgatha

Lifer
Jul 18, 2003
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I even bought a 330w power supply for my OMEN 17 laptop that came with a 210w. I use the 210w when traveling, but most of the time it stays plugged in and runs nice a cool even when gaming with the 330w I got off of eBay. For my home machines I go for 750-850w depending on cost.
 

BoomerD

No Lifer
Feb 26, 2006
59,139
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Another thing we have to consider nowadays is transient spikes...Steve's video was kind of eye-opening to me.

 

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