Best place to buy paint / paint supplies for painting the interior of a house?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by HelloWorl, Feb 1, 2011.

  1. HelloWorl

    HelloWorl Senior member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Messages:
    385
    Likes Received:
    0
    Looking for paint advice. Need to paint the entire inside of a house. Almost the entire 2,300 square feet of the interior needs to be done.

    -Any ideas on where I can buy paint / paint supplies for cheap / good prices?
    -Any recommendations on good paint brands?

    Thanks
     
  2. GoodRevrnd

    GoodRevrnd Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2001
    Messages:
    5,728
    Likes Received:
    7
    I used some Behr and it was okay. Then I used some Sherman Williams SuperPaint and it was just so much easier to work with (but costs twice as much). Goes on smoother and better coverage. I was using some painter's contract account so I was getting a good deal though, and not too long ago I saw a lot of 30% off coupons in mailers. Benjamin Moore and Dunn Edwards are supposedly better.
     
  3. eldorado99

    eldorado99 Lifer

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2004
    Messages:
    34,482
    Likes Received:
    1,068
    I like Benjamin Moore paint for the most part. When it comes to paint you pay more to pay less, sort of like buying tires for your car. Don't cheap out on paint and you will be happy; cheap out on paint and you will kick yourself.

    We put on some nice paint on our garage doors 15 years ago that still looks brand new on the front of the house, used the same colour in a cheaper brand that same year on the back of the house which we had to repaint 4 years later. Every single experience I have had with cheap paint has told me the same thing; it is half the price because you have to repaint it AT LEAST twice as often. If you don't mind repainting every year or two then buy cheap paint I guess, but I really hate painting. Granted I'm mostly talking about exterior paint in my experience, but interior paint is the same deal, it will get scuffed up and worn in some areas, although it will usually last longer than exterior paint - YMMV.
     
    #3 eldorado99, Feb 1, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2011
  4. runzwithsizorz

    runzwithsizorz Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    Messages:
    3,389
    Likes Received:
    2
    We had to paint our entire new house, (also aprox. 2500sq.ft.). The builder said he had primered the place, but it was some clay based, chalky like stuff, so I would highly consider a good primer. We went with a local Benjamin Moore dealer, who free of charge, sent an interior designer out and spent all afternoon with the wife. Our main floor has a rather open floor plan, so to try and delineate the rooms, and maintain a smooth transition was no easy task. Our house goes from Victorian, to Colonial, to French country, to white Rattan, with an oak kitchen in between D: Yikes! The designer also helped with wallpaper, tile and window treatments, and had a line on where they could be purchased. The wife is pretty good, but this designers services were invaluable.
    As others have said, you get what you pay for. I bought some cheap exterior, *LOWES VALSPAR* enamel for some trim outside, and the stuff was peeling within a year, --- never again!
     
    #4 runzwithsizorz, Feb 1, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2011
  5. Vette73

    Vette73 Lifer

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2000
    Messages:
    21,505
    Likes Received:
    0
    Best bang for the buck is lowes Valspar. I did my 2700sq/ft house in that.

    HD's behr is ok for lighter colors but does not seem to hold well with darker colors. have not tried their "new" primer/paint mix.

    Lowes has 10% off coupons all the time so that helps.

    Also if you can wait till Feb 19th weekend Lowes might have their paint rebate. They, like HD, usually do their paint rebates during holidays.
     
  6. marvdmartian

    marvdmartian Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2002
    Messages:
    5,512
    Likes Received:
    0
    As far as paint supplies go, when I bought my house last year (and decided to paint the interior), I shopped around for the best prices on everything I'd need.

    Luckily for me, I have a Home Depot, Lowes and Walmart all within a half mile of each other, so I didn't have to drive all over town. Walmart was good for basic plastic sheet drop cloths, roller pans, rollers & covers, edging tools, etc.

    Lowes and Home Depot were about the same price for most things that Walmart didn't carry (canvas drop cloths, etc). Lowes had the best price on a power painter roller, but I eventually stopped using it, and went back to using a regular roller, as I liked the results I was getting from it better (and didn't have to spend half an hour cleaning the damn thing afterward!!).

    I second the motion for Valspar. Good stuff, plenty of solids, goes on thick & smooth. :thumbsup:
     
  7. IndyColtsFan

    IndyColtsFan Lifer

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2007
    Messages:
    32,147
    Likes Received:
    16
    Another vote for Sherwin Williams. The stuff is almost indestructible.

    I've used Valspar on exterior work and it seems decent as well, but the Sherwin Williams our painters used is the best paint I think I've seen. I used a Glidden "super washable" flat in Colts blue in my man cave and it turned out fine as well.
     
    #7 IndyColtsFan, Feb 1, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2011
  8. NoCreativity

    NoCreativity Golden Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2008
    Messages:
    1,578
    Likes Received:
    2
    Make sure to buy good brushes and rollers.

    I've had good luck with Valspar (interior). Sherwin Williams is pretty good too and usually has holiday sales. A couple guys at work swear by Benjamin Moore.
     
  9. highland145

    highland145 Lifer

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2009
    Messages:
    29,310
    Likes Received:
    51
    This.

    Tried behr once for a primer. Didn't dry completely, stayed gummy. Don't remember which, but someone at behr or home depot said the paint must have frozen at some point. I bought it in the summer so it wasn't my fault.
     
  10. Squisher

    Squisher Lifer

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2000
    Messages:
    21,021
    Likes Received:
    1
    I love Benjamin Moore, but they've priced themselves out of my price point. I use Behr now. They were rated a little better than Valspar on consumer reports.


    btw-if you call them up and tell them you're a contractor or designer they'll send you for free a 2" thick wallet of all their colors so you can make decisions in the comfort of your home.:sneaky:
     
  11. vi edit

    vi edit Elite Member <br> Super Moderator
    Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 1999
    Messages:
    56,239
    Likes Received:
    26
    After putting up 20 gallons of Valspar and 20 gallons of Behr in the last 6 months I stand by Behr as the better paint. It just seems to go on better and coat easier. I've got a trowel finisn on my walls and I missed far less spots with the Behr paint thand the Valspar.
     
  12. SSUSeaWolf

    SSUSeaWolf Senior member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2009
    Messages:
    224
    Likes Received:
    0
    Great info so far. Sounds like we're not going to go with Valspar. Any more advice?
     
  13. Kelvrick

    Kelvrick Lifer

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2001
    Messages:
    18,442
    Likes Received:
    1
    Sherwin williams or Kelly Moore. I went with Kelly Moore myself since my contractor neighbor along with a friend's professional painter dad preferred their paint. Also got to use the painter dad's contractor account at Kelly Moore. Even with the 10&#37; mover coupons, I figure I got better paint at kelly moore for cheaper than behr or valspar.

    Maybe they lied to me or are wrong, but they told me not to bother priming unless I was trying to cover something crazy up since you'll probably have to do 2 coats after the primer anyway. Might as well use the first layer of paint to prime.

    For supply, hit up lowes or home depot and use the 10% coupons. I think the behr rollers are also on sale online right now at homedepot.com.

    My personal opinion, the paint stick with the paint sucker built in wasn't worth it since you have to buy special rollers that cost a bunch of money. I'm also afraid to use too much force because of the fear of cracking it and spilling a tube full of paint everywhere. This may not matter if you have smooth walls, but I don't.

    Oh, I hear good things about that frog tape.

    EDIT: Oh yea, I didn't use any flat paint. I went with eggshell and satin for the walls and went semi-gloss for trim.

    And another thing. Screw those stupid mixer sticks. Get a nice wired or 19v drill and a mixing paddle.
     
    #13 Kelvrick, Feb 1, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2011
  14. alkemyst

    alkemyst No Lifer

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2001
    Messages:
    83,988
    Likes Received:
    4
    Comes down to budget. Benjamin Moore is the best.

    I usually use Behr for bang for buck. In the colors I use and what I have had to cover, I have never had any issues with coverage. I do two coats and prime no matter what. A second coat looks much better no matter how good the paint you use.
     
  15. thedarkwolf

    thedarkwolf Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 1999
    Messages:
    8,635
    Likes Received:
    1
    I just painted my living room with the Behr with primer built in and it was ok going over a real dark color with a light one. My walls are textured and a PITA to get all the little dimples so I still had to do two coats but the second was more half assed and quick. I used the Walmart stuff in most of my other rooms and it seems to hold up fine to me but it did take 3 coats to get all those dimples. I used Ralph Lauren paint from Sears on my cabinets and kitchen walls. Kitchen walls aren't textured and I think I covered it in one coat. Cabinets took 2 or 3 but I was going over a wild color and should have primed first. They have held up well and the cabinets take a lot of abuse.

    Buy a quality angled brush for cutting in around the trim. Makes a real difference if you don't want to deal with taping. I hate taping.
     
  16. sactoking

    sactoking Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2007
    Messages:
    5,460
    Likes Received:
    0
    I used to work in the paint industry, so I will try to give you as unbiased a view as I can while still coming from a knowledge background.

    If you can afford it do your whole house in a "top-brand". Benjamin-Moore, Kelley-Moore, Sherwin-Williams, Pittsburgh would all qualify as such. The initial cost is higher but the durability and repaint factor more than make up for it.

    If you can't afford top-brand, do some research and find which top brands in your area have generic labels or manufacture for other companies. Sherwin-Williams (who was my old employer) also makes Pratt & Lambert and Dutch Boy. I've been to their plant in Garland, TX (largest paint plant in the western hemisphere). There is a difference between the S-W label and Dutch Boy but it's generally not as large as the difference between top labels and other brands like Valspar, Frazee or Olympic.

    The single most expensive ingredient in paint is titanium dioxide. TiO2 is one of the things that gives paint it's ability to "cover". If you are looking at 2 5-gallon buckets of paint and one costs $35 for 5 gallons and the other costs $35 per gallon it's a safe bet to say that the $35/5gallon brand is really skimping on the TiO2 and your paint will cover like crap.

    Assuming you're using latex (water-based) you need one good brush for cut in. Do NOT get bristle, the water will destroy it. Purdy was a top brand but then they got acquired by S-W; I do not know if they've gone downhill since then. For rollers get a 50/50 synthetic blend. That will give you the best mix of absorbency vs transfer. If you have no texture or slight texture (like knockdown) your rollers should be about 1/4" pile. Anything higher is for more pronounced texture like stucco.

    At most paint shops that are paint stores (as opposed to a hardware store or big box) like a S-W store or a Kelley-Moore store the manager/asst. manager has the authority to adjust pricing. If you commit to buying all of your supplies there you can get 30+&#37; off.

    You might be tempted to use "contractor grade" paint from a reputable dealer. Unless you are extremely comfortable in painting, don't! S-W brand ProMar 200 is comparable to their consumer label brand SuperPaint. The difference is that SuperPaint lays down from a brush/roller much better. Contractor grade products like the ProMar are designed for spray and backroll application. Additionally, managers usually have more leeway to price discount for consumers on consumer brands since corporate doesn't want to encourage non-pros to use an "unfriendly" product and be dissatisfied.
     
  17. GoodRevrnd

    GoodRevrnd Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2001
    Messages:
    5,728
    Likes Received:
    7
    Frogtape is pretty good but not as good as one would hope. The trick is it only works on smooth surfaces. If you have even a little bit of texture on your walls it sucks. What actually works better is using normal tape and lightly running over the edges with clear caulk and wiping the excess off. This takes significantly longer but does work much better. Of course, actually being handy and cutting properly is best but I certainly don't fall in that category.
     
  18. bruceb

    bruceb Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2004
    Messages:
    7,869
    Likes Received:
    3
    Benjamin Moore is the best out there. Used it on my addition. Worked great. You need to get a paint with a Primer built in, especially if you are painting over dark colors. If you are painting new drywall for the first time, it needs a primer coat or regular paint will peel. The built in primer paints will cover dark colors with 1 coat.
     
  19. runzwithsizorz

    runzwithsizorz Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    Messages:
    3,389
    Likes Received:
    2
    Are you going to do the work yourself? Have you done much painting before? I got one of those drum type, non-drip rollers where you can fill it with a 1/4 gal. (the paint runner t/m, wife found it on QVC), really makes the job go faster. Never let anyone tell you that *new* walls do not need primer, IMHO, Zinsser is one of the best, helps prevent mold, stains, and smoke damage. Also, forget about all those gimmicky cut-in tools, (got them, been there, done that), all you really need is a good angled cut-in brush. Do not skimp on a paint brush, just take care of it, don't let it clog up, or dry out, if that means rinsing it out every 45 minutes or so, then do it!
    TAKE YOUR TIME! there are plenty of ATOT members with the knowledge to assist.
     
  20. vi edit

    vi edit Elite Member <br> Super Moderator
    Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 1999
    Messages:
    56,239
    Likes Received:
    26
    Having done all the painting and trim painting in a 3200 sq/ft house...I'll kindly disagree. There's these $5 edgers you can buy at lowes/home depot. They are red and have a black handle on them. You refill them with white pads that are almost velour in texture. Those things were invaluable and did an amazing job along ceilings and around doors and windows. There's a light learning curve up front in getting the right amount of paint on the pad so you don't smear.

    This thing: http://www.lowes.com/pd_90212-1077-...;2Fpl__0__s?Ntt=paint+edger&state=R#prod-tabs
     
    #20 vi edit, Feb 1, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2011
  21. Doodoo

    Doodoo Golden Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2000
    Messages:
    1,422
    Likes Received:
    0
    I find those don't get close enough to the edge for me.
     
  22. alkemyst

    alkemyst No Lifer

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2001
    Messages:
    83,988
    Likes Received:
    4
    Plus take a lot longer than learning how to cut with a brush.

    Then again most really don't know how to use the tool collections they buy.
     
  23. Ika

    Ika Lifer

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2006
    Messages:
    14,268
    Likes Received:
    0
    From what I remember from painting our house several years ago this was my experience. We had windows with wooden trim so we needed to be careful around them. I found that the easiest way was to just go over it with a brush carefully, then run over with this tool to get the texture and blend with the roller.

    No one else has mentioned this, so I'll throw it out there - Sears has an "in-house" paint that is actually made by Sherwin-Williams. I worked with it a little bit when I worked at SW over the summer and it was very very nice for the price. You might want to look into if you can, Google can help.
    EDIT: It was Sears Easy Living. Almost as nice as SW SuperPaint in terms of application ease and thickness. Cover was not nearly as nice but for the price (~$15-20 ish IIRC), can you complain?
     
  24. runzwithsizorz

    runzwithsizorz Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    Messages:
    3,389
    Likes Received:
    2
    Though you have to look very closely to see the texture difference between my cut-in, and roller, you can indeed see it. Enamel would really show it. Good call, and thanks for pointing that out.
     
  25. HelloWorl

    HelloWorl Senior member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Messages:
    385
    Likes Received:
    0
    Good info, thanks.