BEST BUY DOESN'T WANT YOUR BUSINESS

Insomniak

Banned
Sep 11, 2003
4,836
0
0
I hope this makes it's way around the net like fire. Best Buy needs a lesson.



Analyzing Customers, Best Buy
Decides Not All Are Welcome
Retailer Aims to Outsmart
Dogged Bargain-Hunters,
And Coddle Big Spenders
Looking for 'Barrys' and 'Jills'

By GARY MCWILLIAMS
Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL
November 8, 2004; Page A1

Brad Anderson, chief executive officer of Best Buy Co., is embracing a heretical notion for a retailer. He wants to separate the "angels" among his 1.5 million daily customers from the "devils."

Best Buy's angels are customers who boost profits at the consumer-electronics giant by snapping up high-definition televisions, portable electronics, and newly released DVDs without waiting for markdowns or rebates.

The devils are its worst customers. They buy products, apply for rebates, return the purchases, then buy them back at returned-merchandise discounts. They load up on "loss leaders," severely discounted merchandise designed to boost store traffic, then flip the goods at a profit on eBay. They slap down rock-bottom price quotes from Web sites and demand that Best Buy make good on its lowest-price pledge. "They can wreak enormous economic havoc," says Mr. Anderson.

Best Buy estimates that as many as 100 million of its 500 million customer visits each year are undesirable. And the 54-year-old chief executive wants to be rid of these customers.

Mr. Anderson's new approach upends what has long been standard practice for mass merchants. Most chains use their marketing budgets chiefly to maximize customer traffic, in the belief that more visitors will lift revenue and profit. Shunning customers -- unprofitable or not -- is rare and risky.

Mr. Anderson says the new tack is based on a business-school theory that advocates rating customers according to profitability, then dumping the up to 20% that are unprofitable. The financial-services industry has used a variation of that approach for years, lavishing attention on its best customers and penalizing its unprofitable customers with fees for using ATMs or tellers or for obtaining bank records.

Best Buy seems an unlikely candidate for a radical makeover. With $24.5 billion in sales last year, the Richfield, Minn., company is the nation's top seller of consumer electronics. Its big, airy stores and wide inventory have helped it increase market share, even as rivals such as Circuit City Stores Inc. and Sears, Roebuck & Co., have struggled. In the 2004 fiscal year that ended in February, Best Buy reported net income of $570 million, up from $99 million during the year-earlier period marred by an unsuccessful acquisition, but still below the $705 million it earned in fiscal 2002.

But Mr. Anderson spies a hurricane on the horizon. Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the world's largest retailer, and Dell Inc., the largest personal-computer maker, have moved rapidly into high-definition televisions and portable electronics, two of Best Buy's most profitable areas. Today, they rank respectively as the nation's second- and fourth-largest consumer-electronics sellers.

Mr. Anderson worries that his two rivals "are larger than us, have a lower [overhead], and are more profitable." In five years, he fears, Best Buy could wind up like Toys 'R' Us Inc., trapped in what consultants call the "unprofitable middle," unable to match Wal-Mart's sheer buying power, while low-cost online sellers like Dell pick off its most affluent customers. Toys 'R' Us recently announced it was considering exiting the toy business.

This year, Best Buy has rolled out its new angel-devil strategy in about 100 of its 670 stores. It is examining sales records and demographic data and sleuthing through computer databases to identify good and bad customers. To lure the high-spenders, it is stocking more merchandise and providing more appealing service. To deter the undesirables, it is cutting back on promotions and sales tactics that tend to draw them, and culling them from marketing lists.

As he prepares to roll out the unconventional strategy throughout the chain, Mr. Anderson faces significant risks. The pilot stores have proven more costly to operate. Because different pilot stores target different types of customers, they threaten to scramble the chain's historic economies of scale. The trickiest challenge may be to deter bad customers without turning off good ones.

"Culturally I want to be very careful," says Mr. Anderson. "The most dangerous image I can think of is a retailer that wants to fire customers."

Mr. Anderson's campaign against devil customers pits Best Buy against an underground of bargain-hungry shoppers intent on wringing every nickel of savings out of big retailers. At dozens of Web sites like FatWallet.com, SlickDeals.net and TechBargains.com, they trade electronic coupons and tips from former clerks and insiders, hoping to gain extra advantages against the stores.

At SlickDeals.net, whose subscribers boast about techniques for gaining hefty discounts, a visitor recently bragged about his practice of shopping at Best Buy only when he thinks he can buy at below the retailer's cost. He claimed to purchase only steeply discounted loss leaders, except when forcing Best Buy to match rock-bottom prices advertised elsewhere. "I started only shopping there if I can [price match] to where they take a loss," he wrote, claiming he was motivated by an unspecified bad experience with the chain. In an e-mail exchange, he declined to identify himself or discuss his tactics, lest his targets be forewarned.

Mr. Anderson's makeover plan began taking shape two years ago when the company retained as a consultant Larry Selden, a professor at Columbia University's Graduate School of Business. Mr. Selden has produced research tying a company's stock-market value to its ability to identify and cater to profitable customers better than its rivals do. At many companies, Mr. Selden argues, losses produced by devil customers wipe out profits generated by angels.

Best Buy's troubled acquisitions of MusicLand Stores Corp. and two other retailers had caused its share price and price-to-earnings ratio to tumble. Mr. Selden recalls advising Mr. Anderson: "The best time to fix something is when you're still making great money but your [price-to-earnings ratio] is going down."

Mr. Selden had never applied his angel-devil theories to a retailer as large as Best Buy, whose executives were skeptical that 20% of customers could be unprofitable. In mid-2002, Mr. Selden outlined his theories during several weekend meetings in Mr. Anderson's Trump Tower apartment. Mr. Anderson was intrigued by Mr. Selden's insistence that a company should view itself as a portfolio of customers, not product lines.

Mr. Anderson put his chief operating officer in charge of a task force to analyze the purchasing histories of several groups of customers, with an eye toward identifying bad customers who purchase loss-leading merchandise and return purchases. The group discovered it could distinguish the angels from the devils, and that 20% of Best Buy's customers accounted for the bulk of profits.

In October 2002, Mr. Anderson instructed the president of Best Buy's U.S. stores, Michael P. Keskey, to develop a plan to realign stores to target distinct groups of customers rather than to push a uniform mix of merchandise. Already deep into a cost-cutting program involving hundreds of employees, Mr. Keskey balked, thinking his boss had fallen for a business-school fad. He recalls telling Mr. Anderson, "You've lost touch with what's happening in your business."

Mr. Anderson was furious, and Mr. Keskey says he wondered whether it was time to leave the company. But after meeting with the chief operating officer and with Mr. Selden, Mr. Keskey realized there was no turning back, he says.

Best Buy concluded that its most desirable customers fell into five distinct groups: upper-income men, suburban mothers, small-business owners, young family men, and technology enthusiasts. Mr. Anderson decided that each store should analyze the demographics of its local market, then focus on two of these groups and stock merchandise accordingly.

Best Buy began working on ways to deter the customers who drove profits down. It couldn't bar them from its stores. But this summer it began taking steps to put a stop to their most damaging practices. It began enforcing a restocking fee of 15% of the purchase price on returned merchandise. To discourage customers who return items with the intention of repurchasing them at an "open-box" discount, it is experimenting with reselling them over the Internet, so the goods don't reappear in the store where they were originally purchased.

"In some cases, we can solve the problem by tightening up procedures so people can't take advantage of the system," explains Mr. Anderson.

In July, Best Buy cut ties to FatWallet.com, an online "affiliate" that had collected referral fees for delivering customers to Best Buy's Web site. At FatWallet.com, shoppers swap details of loss-leading merchandise and rebate strategies. Last October, the site posted Best Buy's secret list of planned Thanksgiving weekend loss leaders, incurring the retailer's ire. Timothy C. Storm, president of Roscoe, Ill.-based FatWallet, said the information may have leaked from someone who had an early look at advertisements scheduled to run the day after Thanksgiving.

In a letter to Mr. Storm, Best Buy explained it was cutting the online link between FatWallet and BestBuy.com because the referrals were unprofitable. The letter said it was terminating all sites that "consistently and historically have put us in a negative business position."

Mr. Storm defends FatWallet.com's posters as savvy shoppers. "Consumers don't set the prices. The merchants have complete control over what their prices and policies are," he says.

Shunning customers can be a delicate business. Two years ago, retailer Filene's Basement was vilified on television and in newspaper columns for asking two Massachusetts customers not to shop at its stores because of what it said were frequent returns and complaints. Earlier this year, Mr. Anderson apologized in writing to students at a Washington, D.C., school after employees at one store barred a group of black students while admitting a group of white students.

Mr. Anderson says the incident in Washington was inappropriate and not a part of any customer culling. He maintains that Best Buy will first try to turn its bad customers into profitable ones by inducing them to buy warranties or more profitable services. "In most cases, customers wouldn't recognize the options we've tried so far," he says.

Store clerks receive hours of training in identifying desirable customers according to their shopping preferences and behavior. High-income men, referred to internally as Barrys, tend to be enthusiasts of action movies and cameras. Suburban moms, called Jills, are busy but usually willing to talk about helping their families. Male technology enthusiasts, nicknamed Buzzes, are early adopters, interested in buying and showing off the latest gadgets.

Staffers use quick interviews to pigeonhole shoppers. A customer who says his family has a regular "movie night," for example, is pegged a prime candidate for home-theater equipment. Shoppers with large families are steered toward larger appliances and time-saving products.

The company hopes to lure the Barrys and Jills by helping them save time with services like a "personal shopper" to help them hunt for unusual items, alert them to sales on preferred items, and coordinate service calls.

Best Buy's decade-old Westminster, Calif., store is one of 100 now using the new approach. It targets upper-income men with an array of pricey home-theater systems, and small-business owners with network servers, which connect office PCs, and technical help unavailable to other customers.

On Tuesdays, when new movie releases hit the shelves, blue-shirted sales clerks prowl the DVD aisles looking for promising candidates. The goal is to steer them into a back room that showcases $12,000 high-definition home-theater systems. Unlike the television sections at most Best Buy stores, the room has easy chairs, a leather couch, and a basket of popcorn to mimic the media rooms popular with home-theater fans.

At stores popular with young Buzzes, Best Buy is setting up videogame areas with leather chairs and game players hooked to mammoth, plasma-screen televisions. The games are conveniently stacked outside the playing area, the glitzy new TVs a short stroll away.

Mr. Anderson says early results indicate that the pilot stores "are clobbering" the conventional stores. Through the quarter ended Aug. 28, sales gains posted by pilot stores were double those of traditional stores. In October, the company began converting another 70 stores.

Best Buy intends to customize the remainder of its stores over the next three years. As it does, it will lose the economies and efficiencies of look-alike stores. With each variation, it could become more difficult to keep the right items in stock, a critical issue in a business where a shortage of a hot-selling big-screen TV can wreak havoc on sales and customer goodwill.

Overhead costs at the pilot stores have run one to two percentage points higher than traditional stores. Sales specialists cost more, as do periodic design changes. Mr. Anderson says the average cost per store should fall as stores share winning ideas for targeting customers.

Write to Gary McWilliams at gary.mcwilliams@wsj.com


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Repost of information in this thread.

AnandTech Moderator
 

mzkhadir

Diamond Member
Mar 6, 2003
9,511
1
76
They don't want your business because

The devils are its worst customers. They buy products, apply for rebates, return the purchases, then buy them back at returned-merchandise discounts. They load up on "loss leaders," severely discounted merchandise designed to boost store traffic, then flip the goods at a profit on eBay. They slap down rock-bottom price quotes from Web sites and demand that Best Buy make good on its lowest-price pledge. "They can wreak enormous economic havoc," says Mr. Anderson.
 

Insomniak

Banned
Sep 11, 2003
4,836
0
0
Oh my god, they apply for rebates that Best Buy offers. How dare they! They buy loss leaders that the company itself marked down to those low low prices. How DARE they! They request that the company make good on it's own policy of matching lower advertised prices at other retailers. HOW DARE THEY?

^ That's all friggin ridiculous. While I do disagree with the return-rebuy method (that's just chickensh*t), the rest of the stuff is something Best Buy only have themselves to blame for. They set their prices, they set their price-match policy, they determine their sales. If they don't like people buying things that are on sale, discount, or matching prices from other stores, they can feel free to change their policies. Until then, I don't want to hear them whining.
 

shadow9d9

Diamond Member
Jul 6, 2004
8,132
2
0
I've been using Best Buy for my videogames for years now... If their deals cease, I will cease buying from them. End of story.
 

McDealer

Member
Mar 8, 2003
95
0
0
Maybe he's secretly worried that his customers know more than his employees. We know how to ask questions - and those leave the "sales specialists" hanging their heads like "WTH is he talking about - I didn't know it could do that" ... so when we try to pinch a few cents outta them, we're recovering our time/knowlege percentage. Sheesh, what a dull bulb.
 

MrChad

Lifer
Aug 22, 2001
13,507
3
81
So Best Buy's policies are backfiring, and now they are experimenting with revising their strategy. This is nothing new (Staples coupons come to mind). If you read the article, it looks like they're not really changing any policies, they're just tweaking store layouts to lure customers toward big ticket items.
 

Triforceofcourage

Platinum Member
Feb 21, 2004
2,911
0
71
This strategy is getting popular among companies but of course best buy is the only one stupidest enough to release a press release about it. They are forgetting an important part of this strategy. Customers talk and whatever they save by pulling this stunt they will surely lose even more on bad public relations with their customers. Another reason why I choose to go to Circuit City.
 

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
102,418
8,370
126
i'm glad you felt free to pirate the article. WSJ wants $750 to post this on a website. are you paying that?
 

KJW

Member
Mar 7, 2000
140
0
0
Here is the flaw in Anderson's logic, and its such a huge flaw, it could only come from a business school professor: Best Buy is assuming that any particular customer always behaves in the same way and that a "devil" will never be profitable. He also views loss leaders and other deals as only ways to get customers into stores so they can be steered toward more profitable purchases. However, this ignores the goodwill factor that sales have on all customers and -- the most important thing Best Buy should be looking for -- retailer brand loyalty.

I buy a lot at Best Buy, much of it from the weekly circulars and deals I find in this forum. These are usually small things (games, DVDs), and some bigger ones (video cards), but these items get me into Best Buy's stores so I become comfortable with their salepeople, store layout, etc. Plus, I always wander around a bit look at the more expensive items. As a result, I usually turn to Best Buy first when I make large purchases, like my TiVo, DVD players, PS2, computer components, etc., all of which I have purchased from Best Buy within the last year. Since much of these items are all competatively priced, I naturally go to Best Buy and not Circuit City, Sixth Avenue Electronics, PC Richards, the Internet, etc.

The point it I fit into at least 2 of their target groups: "high-income family men" (better known as "wife, kids, no life") and "technology enthusiast ("nerd"). I also am a "devil" sometimes, but I am sure that the profit they make on my high-end purchases are significantly offset by deals I get. This is undoubtedly true for most of the customers they see as devils. Now, without the lesser deals to keep us coming into their stores, we will frequent other retailers and build relationships with them. I know lately I have been going to Circuit City more than Best Buy and, after hearing what complete asses Best Buy's top people are, I will think twice before making any big purchases there. Nice going, Mr. Anderson.

I wish I had some Best Buy stock to sell!
 

EvilTwin996

Senior member
Dec 12, 2000
216
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0
Personally, I don't care what the management @ Best Buy thinks of me. I'll shop there when the deal is right for me, and if they stop offering attractive deals, I'll stop buying from them. Simple.

To me, publishing that story just seems like needless whining.
 

imthebadguy

Platinum Member
Aug 14, 2004
2,703
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interesting read, however i barely goto best buy, why not buy online where the prices are so much cheaper....last time i went to BB was to purchase a 1gb CF b4 heading off to alaska last summer, after returning from alaska i returned the 1gb cf, i have no need for that much memory :)
 

AndyD2k

Senior member
Feb 3, 2003
824
0
71
Can't they just apply limits to those deals?? It's their own fault that they taken advantage of. Plus, matching prices seems to be something that no stores like doing even though they clearly present it. Circuit City (at least in Manhattan) will say whatever to deny a price match and mention "fine print" that no one at the stores can produce and headquarters negates.
 

XNice

Golden Member
Jun 24, 2000
1,562
0
76
i am in agreement with them. "we" are the "devils" that kill their profits. I say good job and hope they make it harder for you egay hustlers to make that easy money. I personally only shop at bestbuy when there is a deal so maybe i might fit in their category, but personally this doesnt affect me cause i make enough to pay retail, im jus cheap.

There is nothing wrong with best buy for attempting to maximize their profits. "declare war"? lol.... you guys are funny
 

brucekatz

Senior member
Nov 27, 2003
464
0
0
Guys, don't get mad, you are missing the point. The whole thing is a part of re-structure. First, they are biggest retail electronic store, they may not want to be so bloated; Second, directing away unwanted customer is not unusal. Did you ever NOT want to do any business with certain customer, because not worth the trouble? It is balance between profit and cost. It sounds like they are finally aware that they maybe soon face what ToysRUs are going through, do something before on-line retailers and Walmart take over the whole world.

Read this one, "To lure the high-spenders, it is stocking more merchandise and providing more appealing service. To deter the undesirables, it is cutting back on promotions and sales tactics that tend to draw them, and culling them from marketing lists."
 

WooDaddy

Senior member
Jan 4, 2001
358
0
0
I severly disagree with this method and broadcasting it. As the article said, the stores set the prices and policies, not the consumer. The vast majority of people want a deal. The early adopters who Anderson is trying to cater too is significantly smaller than the current customer base that he gets. If he's will to shave off 50% or more just to get rid of the 20%, then do it. I am an early adopter and upper-income man but I see this as foolish. Best buy is a general electronics retailer.. not a boutique. I also say fruck him. I say so because of this:

Shunning customers can be a delicate business. Two years ago, retailer Filene's Basement was vilified on television and in newspaper columns for asking two Massachusetts customers not to shop at its stores because of what it said were frequent returns and complaints. Earlier this year, Mr. Anderson apologized in writing to students at a Washington, D.C., school after employees at one store barred a group of black students while admitting a group of white students.

I had no idea about this. I hope that employee and manager was fired. But as I am an educated consumer, I will continue to go to his store and buy the loss leaders. I will do the best I can to be the MOST informed consumer and only buy from Best Buy... when, ironically, I can get the Best Buy.. The a-hole needs to change his store name then...

Oh and BTW, wrong forum.
 

LegendKiller

Lifer
Mar 5, 2001
18,256
68
86
You kids are funny, you think you are entitled to some kinda uber-deal every damn time you turn around. Then, you go and buy stuff, apply for rebates then return it after receipt. Returning free Ipods and crap like that only serves to raise prices for the honest customers.

I am sure your oging to come back with "BB can afford to lose, its their fault for not stopping me". Think about what happens when BBY loses cash. Not only does it affect me when I need to buy a higher priced item because of your sorry ass, but it affects their employees. Furthermore, it affects pension funds, mutual funds, teacher retirements, factory workers. EVERYBODY who has anything to do with stock returns is affected by your punk ass ripping companies off.


LK
 

imported_chrisbtx

Senior member
Jun 8, 2004
602
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Originally posted by: LegendKiller
You kids are funny, you think you are entitled to some kinda uber-deal every damn time you turn around. Then, you go and buy stuff, apply for rebates then return it after receipt. Returning free Ipods and crap like that only serves to raise prices for the honest customers.

I am sure your oging to come back with "BB can afford to lose, its their fault for not stopping me". Think about what happens when BBY loses cash. Not only does it affect me when I need to buy a higher priced item because of your sorry ass, but it affects their employees. Furthermore, it affects pension funds, mutual funds, teacher retirements, factory workers. EVERYBODY who has anything to do with stock returns is affected by your punk ass ripping companies off.


LK

I agree whole-heartedly.
 

Valheruxx

Junior Member
Oct 19, 2004
15
0
0
Don't shop at best buy

I worked at BB for about 8 months early this year. After working there, i would NEVER Shop there again. The employees there are trained to con/scam customers into spending money that they do not need. They call this the "complete solution."

I worked in the computer/digital imaging departments, so I saw the worst of it. When someone buys a computer from BB, BB might make 75-250 dollars off of it. The company is really counting on adding accessories, performance service plans, and tech services to the sale to increase profit.

When a customer buys a computer/camera etc, with no accessories or services with it, the employees there literally HATE the customer, usually talking $hit behind their backs. It is the managers who are taught to train the employees like this. We were taught to pick out the customers who looked like they wern't going to add on anything to the sale. Usually when we had a good deal going on, like laptops at 500 dollars after rebates, the managers would lie and state that we did not have any in stock, because nobody (the cheapos) would buy service plans, or accessories with them. Everyday the managers come by the department with charts showing how you are doing for the day, the two main numbers are Performace Service plan percentage, PSP %, and Accessory %. A good PSP number would be 10% in the computer department, meaning for every 1000 dollars out of the department, you should have 100 in PSP, which is pure profit. (forgot to mention that the PSPs suck)

Anyway, throughout the sale with the individual, the employees are taught to lie. "You HAVE to buy this GOLD PLATED USB cable, the aluminum one's suck, you will not get maximum transfer speed on your printer with the aluminum ones, and they also don't last that long." So instead of buying a 20 dollar USB cable that is allready overpriced, they are forced into buying a 34 dollar DYNEX (best buy company) made usb cable which at employee price (store cost + 5%) is only 1.34, look at the profit margin at that. To bad the customers didn't know they could go to walmart and buy one for 6 bucks. The lying continues, stating that batteries on the laptops will completly die out after a year, so they are conned into buying that 299 dollar PSP. That a 128mb flash card will only hold x amount of pictures, when in reality it will hold x*2. Telling customers that printers come with "starter cartridges", which are only half filled.

We had a guy come into the store with a BB.com order for a laptop. He went to the service desk to pick it up, and they would not give it to come right away, because he didn't buy anything with it. They delayed the poor man over 45 minutes, having at least 5 differant employees including tecs, sales manager, and me, talk to him and try to con him into buying a psp with it. He should have been in and out in 5 minutes, instead he was hassled forever, and ended up getting pissed. Fun experience!

God forgid you are foriegn. My department manager's #1 pet peeve were them. If one came in with their family looking at a laptop, he would tell us not to help them out, and if they asked questions either push them aside, or tell them to go to walmart because they have better deals. BB only wants the custome who is going to buy service plans and other profit generating items with the product. We are told to force battery backups, optical mice, speakers, antiviral installation, windows update installations etc, anything you can think of. If a customer allready has a surge protector what do we tell them? "Oh sir, that surge protector is a year old? Well they act just like an oil filter, after getting slammed with surges over a short period of time they will no longer protect your computer (investment as we tell them). Here, buy this 134 dollar dynex battery backup with AVR." I was once evil...I laughed at the customers conned into buying 199 dollar ACP backups with a laptop. That's what you get when you sell stuff to little old ladies who don't know what they need.

Oh sir, that KODAK camera can ONLY transfer the pictures if you buy the docking station, that's the only way!!!! Sir, you NEED antivirus proteciton, we can install it today for 59 dollars (even though you can buy it for 29 and install it yourself, which a 5 year old could do).

I'm not sure where i'm going with this, but BB preys on the rich people who will buy anything. They do not like poor or middle class people at all. I would litterally get yelled at/written up if I missed too many PSPs on computers. God forbid the person didn't have the money to buy it! Oh and that's where the BB card comes into play, "if you can force them into signing up, they will buy anything". That's the usual mentality at the store.

My managers would allways get vacations and gifts from the company because their departments/stores did well. They were so obsessed with winning this or that, beating this store or the one down the block, that they would do ANYTHING to increase their numbers. Someone would come into the store to get their laptop checked up because it was running a little slow, and by the time they went out the tecs would have nailed with them spyware removal, RAM installation, hard drive upgrades etc.

Go to BB, buy their new release CDs, buy the movies, they are priced fairly well. But if you're going to buy a TV or a computer, go in there and be stern. Tell them you want THAT computer, you don't want ANYTHING with it (even if you do need anything, it's 50% more at BB, their accessories are marked up BIG TIME), and tell them you want it NOW. That is the only way, or else they will try to boss you around.

AGain, not sure where I went with this. I did not plan this out at all, it's not written that well, with random thoughts off the top of my head. But if you have any questions at all, feel free to ask in the forum or PM me, I won't mind answering at all.

Oh yeh, forgot to mention I'm wearnig a 100 dollar Keneth Cole watch complements of a BB contest my dpeartment won for scamming more people into signing up for WONDERFUL AOL then any other store in the region ;)
 

shinson

Senior member
Mar 17, 2000
241
0
0
I agree that undesirables are people who buy items, apply for rebates and such and return items. That is lame. People should be ashamed of being such losers.

I agree that undesirables are people who buy items, apply for rebates and such, and then turn around and sell the items on ceratin un-named web sites (like Egay). It is legal but still lame.

I disagree that undesirables are people who are just looking for a bargain. I buy items for as little as possible for my own personal use. I fill out and track rebates like the rest of you. I do not try to "beat" the system, just "work with" the system.

Best Buy sets the price and the rebate amounts. If they can't live with that then change the system.
Unfortunately, you will still get the "undesirables" who return items, which is almost stealing and the profit hunters who sell stuff on un-named web sites.

Just my $0.02

No Flames please!

 

Bacinator

Senior member
Feb 6, 2003
837
0
0
Wow. I hardly shop at Best Buy lately anyway. The man doesn't want my business? Hah! He'll get more of it.

And I love how they say we're after their 'Loss leaders'. We're after the deals. How many people REALLY lurk Anandtech and Fatpocket simple to get back at Best Buy?

And even the few that do, are following sales/deals which Best Buy has put forth.

How retarded.
 

osiris3mc

Golden Member
Oct 23, 2001
1,514
0
71
Every experience I've had at Best Buy has been sour. I used to work there (in high school) and must say it was horribly run. Not a single member on the entire staff was knowledgeable about the products they were selling. The computer department would and still does sell items to people that they don't need. I've seen it first hand and I'm sure many of you already know this. I'm not selling they have a duty to any customer, but Best Buy is quite good a ripping off the unknowledgeable person, er, make that their "best customer."
 

kwo

Golden Member
Mar 18, 2002
1,318
0
0
Originally posted by: ElFenix
i'm glad you felt free to pirate the article. WSJ wants $750 to post this on a website. are you paying that?

i would direct you to the Wall Street Journal online website where they clearly state that this week is OPEN HOUSE (free reading)