Bench repair, best type of wood

rsutoratosu

Platinum Member
Feb 18, 2011
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#1

herm0016

Diamond Member
Feb 26, 2005
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#2
cedar or redwood for outdoors. Use a oil based finish or something like cabots oil. A film finish like poly will not last long outside. I would just seal with something like Thompson water seal.
 

rsutoratosu

Platinum Member
Feb 18, 2011
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#4
Ok cool. I did google and find teak but HD doesn't seem to carry ones I can cut to length and bolt on... ill visit the actual store and see.. my other option was to use those synthetic deck wood thingy ? lol

ill see whats at HD or lowes.. thanks..
 
Feb 26, 2006
51,727
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#5
Ok cool. I did google and find teak but HD doesn't seem to carry ones I can cut to length and bolt on... ill visit the actual store and see.. my other option was to use those synthetic deck wood thingy ? lol

ill see whats at HD or lowes.. thanks..
Lowes and HD aren't likely to have teak...

The composite deck material MIGHT work just fine for a bench.
 
Nov 30, 2004
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#6
I like eastern red cedar, and it should be fairly inexpensive.
 

herm0016

Diamond Member
Feb 26, 2005
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#7
The plastic deck boards are pretty flimsy and usually need 12 in center support. The cedar will be less flimsy.
 
Jul 11, 2001
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#8
Back when I shared this house, someone got ahold of a DIY table and put it in our back yard. It was made of lumber and plywood. It deteriorated and I repaired it a few times and it again became a miserable sight and most people would have broken it into pieces and shoved into the trash barrel. But I got a brainstorm and changed my strategies. I rebuilt it again, but this time made it fairly impervious to the weather, which around here is fairly mild. I see ice on it in the winter, but it never snows. The ice melts soon enough later in the morning. I clean it periodically with a wet sponge, squeegee it and wipe with a towel.

The essential thing I did was fiberglass the top, the final two coats being tinted finish coats. It's been 15 years and it's still in great shape. The fiberglass isn't like freshly new but it's solid. I could apply another layer of topcoat but that would just be cosmetic.

Below, see BEFORE and AFTER images.

 
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Jul 11, 2001
21,665
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#9
Or...if you're a real baller...teak.
Teak is a wood of choice in boats due to it's relative resistance to deterioration from moisture. Marine supply would be a source or they'd know where to get it locally. I used to work on the docks, so made a living more than anything maintaining teak, also cleaning boats. If you use teak you'll want to treat periodically. There are kits to clean it, removing surface deterioration layer (wear gloves!), after which you let it dry and sand it. Then use liquid stuff to treat it, special oils. Or you can varnish it, but for a bench, the oils would look nicest. Freshly oiled teak is handsome.
I like eastern red cedar, and it should be fairly inexpensive.
Probably a lot cheaper than teak.
 

mxnerd

Diamond Member
Jul 6, 2007
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#10
I would just seal with something like Thompson water seal.
Yep. I would use Thompson water seal stain too, which will penetrate the wood and seal it. It lasts a long time.
 
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rsutoratosu

Platinum Member
Feb 18, 2011
2,661
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#11
Looks like i was too late, i just saw on my cam, my mother in law had a carpenter prime it in white.. i dont think he even sand it.. theres bolts missing, and its sagging.. oh well..
 

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