Being black sucks (at least for me)

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busmaster11

Platinum Member
Mar 4, 2000
2,875
0
0
Architech,

Congrats on not fitting into any stereotype and being your own man... It's a basic sign of intelligence that Jesse Jackson and those don't quite get. I mean being a member of the clergy and focusing your fights on racial issues that many blacks don't even feel are worth fighting for, and having illigitamate children and such...

Me... Some Asians including my gf think I don't speak enough Chinese or are in tune enough with that side of me. Down in Champaign my ex-coworkers laugh at me if I bring even slightly exotic or non-American food in...

I'm sure you know to be proud of who you are. Don't let narrow-minded people from any social setting get you down.
 

toant103

Lifer
Jul 21, 2001
10,514
1
0
come on now, i'm asian.

People think i'm good at math, i know karate. blah blah. i'm a ricer, i'm rich.


hmmmmmmmmmm,

but it's true.


:)
 

Spyro

Diamond Member
Dec 4, 2001
3,366
0
0
Originally posted by: y2kc
I normally avoid race threads like the plague, but here goes.

I?ve heard this before. I almost felt your pain, once. However the worse thing you can do in this situation is allow other peoples hang-ups be the determining factor in how you live your life. I refuse to allow the ignorance of others (black or white) determine my sense of self, my values and what I like and dislike. I?ve been accused of the same thing (being a sell-out) years ago at my old job because I did not discriminate. I spoke to everyone, in front of everyone, no different than the day before. I never caught hell personally but I did read some graffiti in the bathroom that said I ?kissed the white man?s ass?, just because I would have a conversation with white people, just because I viewed people as people, first. Whoever it was who wrote the graffiti never had the guts to say it to my face and even if they did, I would not have done anything, again, I do not let other peoples hang-ups interfere with me being me.

A couple of my current co-workers have issues with this as well. The guy I work with mostly (white) is always commenting on how he?s ?amazed? when I sing along with classic rock tunes on the radio, and how he doesn?t believe I can?t dance and that I eat pork. Ironically this kid (ten years my junior) listens almost exclusively to rap, wears baggy clothes and drives around with his music blaring. I laugh at him and his hang ups and never defend myself against his stereotypical view of what being black entails. It?s his problem, not mine.

My brother is different than I am. He?s constantly spouting the rhetoric to his children about how everything wrong in our community is the white man?s fault. His children are falling right in line with this mantra and it?s crippling their ability to grow and produce. It is not teaching them to strive to overcome the struggles that are sure to come in life. They are already being taught that it?s somebody else?s fault that [insert failure here]. Somehow his problems have nothing to do with having more children than he could afford, or ruining your credit so you can look like a million dollars on a $60.000 salary, or driving an Acura that you can?t afford whilst living in a row home.

One of my brother?s children calls my daughter ?white girl?. It?s supposed to be an insult because I teach my kids to speak properly, I don?t let them listen to or watch the (sometimes) sexually charged rap and R&B music and videos that his children do, and I don?t allow emulation of popular culture in my home in the form of dress, language etc. My daughter is also ostracized because she has white friends. I?m glad that my kids have the same resilience that I have in this regard. The best part is that my kids don?t resent what I?m trying to instill in them, which makes my job easier.

Racism exists, it?s real. I?ve been called "the n word" to my face by white folks young and old, many times, for no reason other than showing up. I don?t get mad; I pity the young ones because they are going to grow up consumed by hate. I pity the old ones because they spent their entire lives carrying that burden. What a waste?.

Arkitech, be yourself and be happy. Being black doesn?t suck, being treated badly does. I don?t care what color you are.

Amen to that. Well said! :)
 

yellowperil

Diamond Member
Jan 17, 2000
4,598
0
0
I guess I'll throw my $0.02 worth of personal experience in as well -

I went to a high school that was pretty integrated, about 40% minority. It pretty much had the rep of being the ghetto school in my county while about 5 miles away was one of the richest towns in FL (with an 'elite' public high school). Me and my sister were the only Koreans there and I hung out with only a few people. I am thankful that I was never discriminated against by the school or at work (except by this one employer), but I've had enough encounters with prejudiced individuals that to this day whenever somebody says things essentially like if we ignore race then racism will go away, I cannot help but think they are naive. I know I am generalizing, but whenever we had class discussions in high school (U.S. History), college (sociology), and my law school (Constitutional Law), this argument will always come up.

I've noticed to many in the majority in my classrooms, race is an outdated concept that exists only with white supremacists and blacks like Al Sharpton and Jesee Jackson. They seem to think anyone who thinks race is a significant social factor is trying to justify using it as a crutch. I wonder if it's because they were raised seeing themselves as 'race-less' and do not comprehend seeing race as part of one's identity. For minority individuals, especially those who have personal experience with prejudice, it's a daily reminder of your identity. Every time you're out in a public place (esp. one you're unfamiliar with), there's always the apprehension of how others are going to react to you just because of your skin color. It is not just some kind of irrational feeling, because there are enough racists out there to keep you on your guard. I've heard people accuse blacks of being intimidating and aggressive but if that generalization holds any truth then I sympathize with blacks because that constant apprehension would be enough to drive anybody into a thick shell. Again, to any person who's never had that kind of exposure it seems like paranoia but IMO it is more like adapting to one's environment.
 

0roo0roo

No Lifer
Sep 21, 2002
64,862
84
91
Originally posted by: wyvrn
I understand race relations in this country still need a great deal of improvement. I am speaking from experience because I am white and my wife is Asian, and we get our share of looks. Some of my family (born on southern farms) still get very uncomfortable around my wife, because they are ignorant of her culture and really just don't know what to say. The more time she spends with them, the more they realize she is a wonderful person, but it takes time.

HOWEVER, I get upset when I see famous black people, such as Halle Berry (who is the most fantastically gorgeous woman I have EVER seen, she does it for me) and Samuel Jackson during some AA awards who on TV say "I am just so glad to be receiving this award from my own". It was made clear to me by the show they were referring to people of their own color, because everyone on the show was African American. . I am sorry to say I do not recall the name of the awards show, I caught it in the middle one night and was so disgusted by those comments that I turned it off! When anyone (regardless of color) refers to "their own" and purposefully separates themselves from the general culture BECAUSE of their color, that just ends up furthering the race barriers we deal with in this country. I really hope for a world where color will not matter in people's minds, but I think all sides of the issue tend to promote racial inequality without recognizing that they are doing so.


Originally posted by: Arkitech
I usually try to not let it get to me but its tough sometimes. Just a few weeks ago my wife and I were looking at some new homes in a new subdivision in a suburb of Chicago and the lady who was showing the homes actually told us "would'nt you be more comfortable living in an area with your own kind". I was so mad that I just left without saying a word. It would be so nice if people were treated by their actions instead of appearances.




funny thing is halle berry is half white.


i always find it funny how pc it is to embrace your black side, and discard your white side if your a half black person. theres one camp that always seeks total ownership.


tiger woods catches hell for not choosing a side.
 

BaliBabyDoc

Lifer
Jan 20, 2001
10,737
0
0
Yep, I think popular black culture has done more to harm blacks than any racist group there is. The violence and negativity in Rap music, the sense of entitlement, and the "black leadership's" never ending blame games have led to a culture of irresponsibility and moral poverty. It's also led whites to an even more negative image of blacks.

So let me guess . . . the first black physician and dentist graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill in the 70s but disco and blaxpoitation is the primary reason blacks lack the upward mobility of essentially every other ethnic group in America?!

Almost every state in the nation operated a two-tier system of higher education . . . assuming there were any options available to minorities. The majority even took Dartmouth (or was it Princeton?) back . . . talk about Indian givers.

The foundation of my state's prosperity was agriculture in particular tobacco. The good ol' boy network systematically denied opportunities to minorities . . . grievances which have been acknowledged but still not properly compensated by the federal and state government. Successful farmers could allow their children to complete K-12 and go on to college . . . assuming the college would allow you to matriculate.

Anybody that believes the images of "black culture" and stereotypes as protrayed in the media clearly lacks the intelligence to see beyond such drivel or the moral/cultural fortitude and curiosity to expand their personal knowledge of people from different backgrounds. From my experience, it is typically both. Particularly in the South where ignorance is a way of life for ALL ethnicities raised within the broader cultural context.

Chris Rock's comedy is not the best but he has at least one truism in his typically infantile rants . . ."everything white people don't like about black people . . . black people REALLY don't like about black people."

You know, it's amazing, but "white flight" is virtually non-existent in the South (GA, SC and NC). When I lived there, I noticed more intergreted neighborhoods than I ever saw up here in the Midwest.
Where exactly do you live? If you know anything about demographics in the South you would be aware the majority of school districts had dramatic re-distributions of students by race AFTER busing. Essentially whites either moved away from integrated schools or removed their children in favor of private schools. Most of the integration is exactly the same as twenty years ago . . . black people on one side of the tracks and white people on the other.

That commercial is so true... Your parents are the ones who spread racism. A child has no discretion either way, it is the culture, parents, and peers which shape them.
My neurosurgery team was two Caucasians, one Puerto Rican, one Iranian, and a mutt (moi). It was the most non-PC environment I've ever experienced . . . and it was great. While much of the REAL world is NOT a meritocracy our little troupe cared about nothing else. The least knowledgeable of the group was white but it didn't matter b/c everybody got their share of good natured ribbing ie. exaggerate with the stereotypes but focus on the REAL people you know.

When the PR left a patient with a huge pneumocephalus (air in the head) or a white resident never knew the answer to an attending's questions no one questioned their aptitude based on BS generalizations . . . we could focus on the particular . . . and just call them the tool they've proven themselves to be.

 

Amused

Elite Member
Apr 14, 2001
55,961
14,380
146
Originally posted by: BaliBabyDoc
Yep, I think popular black culture has done more to harm blacks than any racist group there is. The violence and negativity in Rap music, the sense of entitlement, and the "black leadership's" never ending blame games have led to a culture of irresponsibility and moral poverty. It's also led whites to an even more negative image of blacks.

So let me guess . . . the first black physician and dentist graduated from UNC-Chapel Hill in the 70s but disco and blaxpoitation is the primary reason blacks lack the upward mobility of essentially every other ethnic group in America?!

Almost every state in the nation operated a two-tier system of higher education . . . assuming there were any options available to minorities. The majority even took Dartmouth (or was it Princeton?) back . . . talk about Indian givers.

The foundation of my state's prosperity was agriculture in particular tobacco. The good ol' boy network systematically denied opportunities to minorities . . . grievances which have been acknowledged but still not properly compensated by the federal and state government. Successful farmers could allow their children to complete K-12 and go on to college . . . assuming the college would allow you to matriculate.

Anybody that believes the images of "black culture" and stereotypes as protrayed in the media clearly lacks the intelligence to see beyond such drivel or the moral/cultural fortitude and curiosity to expand their personal knowledge of people from different backgrounds. From my experience, it is typically both. Particularly in the South where ignorance is a way of life for ALL ethnicities raised within the broader cultural context.

Chris Rock's comedy is not the best but he has at least one truism in his typically infantile rants . . ."everything white people don't like about black people . . . black people REALLY don't like about black people."

What racist group caused the historical racism you speak of? I thought that was caused by a society wide social form of racism. I stated that negative elements of popular black culture has done more harm than any racist group. You have said nothing that disputes that. I never said that they caused more harm than white racism.

Please, if you're going to try and prove me wrong, don't throw up straw men to do it

You know, it's amazing, but "white flight" is virtually non-existent in the South (GA, SC and NC). When I lived there, I noticed more intergreted neighborhoods than I ever saw up here in the Midwest.
Where exactly do you live? If you know anything about demographics in the South you would be aware the majority of school districts had dramatic re-distributions of students by race AFTER busing. Essentially whites either moved away from integrated schools or removed their children in favor of private schools. Most of the integration is exactly the same as twenty years ago . . . black people on one side of the tracks and white people on the other.

Where DO I live, or where DID I live?

I now live in Chamapign, IL. I DID live in Augusta and Atlanta GA, Columbia and Hilton Head Island, SC, and Charlotte, NC. I grew up in the San Fernando Valley, CA. I never experienced "white flight" while living in the South. If a black family moved into an upper middle class neighborhood, the whites did not start selling their homes in droves like they do here in the Midwest. If hispanics moved into the neighborhood, whites did not start selling their homes as if they were cursed like they did when I was growing up in SoCal. Nearly every middle and upper middle class subdivision I lived in in the South was moderately, to heavily intergrated.

To be sure, blacks still lag behind whites in the income department, but even in this area, I noticed the lower income areas in these cities were more intergrated than those in CA and the Midwest.

In fact, you want to know the most segregated city I lived in in the South? Hilton Head Island. Yes, that bastion of transplanted white liberalism from the North East.

You can pull statistics out of your ass until it bleeds. It wont change what I experienced in my more than ten years of living in the South East, my more than 18 years of living in SoCal, and the five+ years I've lived in the Midwest. Granted, my experience in the South did not start until the late eighties. But by then I noticed that it was more intergrated than SoCal.
 

BarMan

Banned
Jan 4, 2001
1,204
0
0
Originally posted by: Arkitech


and before anyone asks, no I do not:

wear braided hair
drive a vehicle with flashy rims and tinted windows
listen to Nelly, 50 Cents, Ja Rule and whoever the latest thug rapper currently is
use ebonics
smoke weed/grass
blast music while driving
wear extremely baggy pants that fall off of my waist
wear shirts with the designers name imprinted on the front or back
sell drugs
have a parole officer


very stereotypical there
one, what's the matter with these things to begin with? I'm not saying I do all of the above, but who even cares if they do.
the point is be yourself, that's all you can be.

I'm a black male, I wear baggy pants, I listen to ALL music, I've smoked weed, I don't like blasting in cars, I shave my head, I like rims, WTF is ebonics?, I like designer clothing and non-designer clothing, don't sell drugs, and I don't have a parole officer

I do know what you mean yet to be the BETTER man it shouldn't bother you at all. The less emotion you show towards those little things the better you will feel! I can truely say in my lifetime if nothing else that I have no enemies. People are people, let that be your guide.
 

BarMan

Banned
Jan 4, 2001
1,204
0
0
Originally posted by: Arkitech
Originally posted by: chasem
sorry you feel that way,
if i were you, i wouldn't

but dont forget, no matter who you are, life gennerally sucks. good rules to live by :)

heh, life indeed can be sucky at times

thank god for video games :D

Damn straight!

out of work ex-student that only has his computer and a xbox to life by

:frown: :( :eek: :brokenheart:

I need a job... *sigh*
 

tcsenter

Lifer
Sep 7, 2001
18,412
288
126
One of my co-workers (who is black) labeled me a sell-out because I did'nt use slang and I listened to rock music every now and then. Another co-worker of mine (who is white) once told me that some of the other people in the office were intimidated by me. That really floored me because 98% of the time I'm always in a good mood. I always go out of my way to hold a door for someone or just try to greet people in my work area. But yet some people still refuse to talk me if I say good afternoon, certain women hold their purses tighter when I get on the elevator. Its maddening, I just wish people would see me for a human being instead of a black guy.
So two idiots have been able to influence your view of the world?

There is a saying: you can please some people all of the time, all people some of the time, but you can't please all of the people all of the time. Well, that may actually be somewhat ambitious or optimistic, because some people will never be pleased about anything.

The world is full of all kinds of people with all kinds of opinions. Its really an unworkable notion to think that you can 'bend' yourself to the whims and fancies of all, so they will like you. Further, why is the emphasis on them liking you? Shouldn't they be equally if not more concerned about you liking them?

There are people whose views are like yours, who will accept who you are. Don't try to find acceptance where it isn't, look for it where it is.
 

bolsen

Senior member
Jul 31, 2002
288
0
0
IMO, people are who they want to be.

If you want to feel bad about things you can't control, that's your fault.

 

yellowperil

Diamond Member
Jan 17, 2000
4,598
0
0
The problem is not with overt racists. Those kind of people are easy to spot and decried by (almost) all.

I cannot count how many times I have been in the presence (or more accurately, absence) of a certain group of people and the group begins to "talk". People who say they are not prejudiced, in the absence of social pressure and strangers, show their true colors. These are individuals who have accepted tolerance (as in putting up with) of other races but do not appreciate diversity. In other words they've superficially accepted the notion that racism is bad and people shouldn't be discriminated against based on skin color but when they're by themselves they make some of the most vile generalizations I ever heard. I think it happens a lot more common than people think. I've heard it in every place I've worked among employees, and general social settings. One person will make a comment, then another will support him/her, and then all the sudden it becomes a bitch-fest. As soon as someone objects that person will be criticized for being PC. Overhearing stuff like that makes me self-conscious as hell. Call me over-sensitive and thin-skinned but it's hard to look at strangers the same way once you've heard the things they're thinking.
 

StageLeft

No Lifer
Sep 29, 2000
70,150
5
0
One of my co-workers (who is black) labeled me a sell-out because I did'nt use slang and I listened to rock music every now and then. Another co-worker of mine (who is white) once told me that some of the other people in the office were intimidated by me.
Sounds to me like the first guy is a flaming jackass, and the second guy is flaming assjack!
 

SagaLore

Elite Member
Dec 18, 2001
24,037
21
81
Blame it on the other "black" guys. Some of the coolest people I know are black, but, they are also like you - courteous, a gentlemen, educated, classy... but I would be lying if I said I don't feel intimidated when there is someone I don't know near me, out in public - because there are so many people out there that totally follow the stereotype, they mush up the language and always put on a persona of being too cool for anyone else. And then there's the fact I've had first hand experiences that have altered my perception..

1. Halloween, I was 12 - a slightly older black kid walked passed me, grabbed by bag of candy, ripped my costume in the process and ran down a dark street while leaving his younger friends/brothers just standing there by themselves.

2. First day in a new city middle school where black/white was 50/50 - had my coat stolen from my locker. Later that week there was a search with metal detectors, several knives found, I think there might even have been a gun...

3. Later that month in that school, walking home and big guy gets up behind me with a cigarette and says he's going to burn my ear if I don't give him whatever money I have. Luckily for me I recognized him from a science class I was in so I just kept walking assuming he was joking... but my little brother didn't know that and he was freaking out...

And then you have all the movies and tv and news that amplify this stereotype, but it seems to be such an overwhelming behaivor in the black community... it's a self defeating, self destructing cycle...

Some advice, you just stay who you are, raise your kids the same, and slowly but surely you with everyone else on the same track will overwrite this stereotype. Oh, and also - vote Republican. ;) (Although I say that half-jokingly, there is a lot of truth to that, as long as the democratic party has "control" over the majority of the black population, they will never rise to more than their current condition as that would potentially hurt the democrat's voter base)
 

tcsenter

Lifer
Sep 7, 2001
18,412
288
126
The problem is not with overt racists. Those kind of people are easy to spot and decried by (almost) all.

I cannot count how many times I have been in the presence (or more accurately, absence) of a certain group of people and the group begins to "talk". People who say they are not prejudiced, in the absence of social pressure and strangers, show their true colors. These are individuals who have accepted tolerance (as in putting up with) of other races but do not appreciate diversity.
That's really what it is all about. I have to tolerate you, as in you have as many rights as I, but I sure as hell don't have to like you. Similarly, you don't have to like me, and I don't really give a damn whether you do or don't, but you must tolerate me because I have as many right as you.

Its not the best we can hope for, but its the most we can ask. Its called civility. I'll take it over overt racism every day of the week.

 

SagaLore

Elite Member
Dec 18, 2001
24,037
21
81
Originally posted by: Arkitech
I usually try to not let it get to me but its tough sometimes. Just a few weeks ago my wife and I were looking at some new homes in a new subdivision in a suburb of Chicago and the lady who was showing the homes actually told us "would'nt you be more comfortable living in an area with your own kind". I was so mad that I just left without saying a word. It would be so nice if people were treated by their actions instead of appearances.

Instead of leaving, you should have started a debate with her. Ask her where her family originally came from, and then ask her if she'd be happier living there.
 

SagaLore

Elite Member
Dec 18, 2001
24,037
21
81
Originally posted by: Mallow
Are you a large man? 220lbs+ 6'2"+? If you are that might explain the intimidation. Most people would be intimidated even if you were white with those statistics. Do you have tatoos?

Do black people get tatoos? :confused:
 

LeeTJ

Diamond Member
Jan 21, 2003
4,899
0
0
The foundation of my state's prosperity was agriculture in particular tobacco. The good ol' boy network systematically denied opportunities to minorities . . . grievances which have been acknowledged but still not properly compensated by the federal and state government. Successful farmers could allow their children to complete K-12 and go on to college . . . assuming the college would allow you to matriculate.

babybalidoc

when you say "minorites" do you mean "blacks" or all minorities??
 

CChaos

Golden Member
Mar 4, 2003
1,586
0
0
I say **** 'em. ***holes abound. It's not just racial differences. People will see any difference as a reason to feel superior. Ignore them and their tiny little minds and live your life for yourself. You summed it up best in your first post, you can't make everyone happy so just worry about making yourself happy. That ***** in the elevator is gonna get mugged by a white guy.
 

Arkitech

Diamond Member
Apr 13, 2000
8,356
3
76
Wow, its a lot of interesting comments and experiences here. I appreciate the postive remarks but now I kinda feel like a chump for even bringing this up. I really don't do a lot of complaining, I'm the kind of guy who usually tries to change things before I complain about them.

But anyway I was kinda thinking about stereotypes and racial attitudes and it forced me to face some harsh truths. First off what exactly is a stereotype, I know this is probably a long shot from a technical definition but a stereotype is usually a description or grouping of a person or people based on their race, status or background. With that definition in mind I realized that in some cases certain stereotypes may actually have some elements of truth. I won't go into any details but in some cases people may actually be creating stereotypes about themselves by behaving in a particular manner. Of course a stereotype obviously can't define each and every person within a particular group or race, so you always have some people within that group who get burned or identified as something they're not. Its human nature to automatically assume things about individuals we don't know based on their appearance, it takes a really enlightened person to go beyond merely whats on the surface. I've been guilty as well when it comes to making judgements purely based on surface observations. Its rarely any easy answers in life, I guess all I can do is just be myself and try to help make improvements where I can.
 

LeeTJ

Diamond Member
Jan 21, 2003
4,899
0
0
Originally posted by: Arkitech
Wow, its a lot of interesting comments and experiences here. I appreciate the postive remarks but now I kinda feel like a chump for even bringing this up. I really don't do a lot of complaining, I'm the kind of guy who usually tries to change things before I complain about them.

But anyway I was kinda thinking about stereotypes and racial attitudes and it forced me to face some harsh truths. First off what exactly is a stereotype, I know this is probably a long shot from a technical definition but a stereotype is usually a description or grouping of a person or people based on their race, status or background. With that definition in mind I realized that in some cases certain stereotypes may actually have some elements of truth. I won't go into any details but in some cases people may actually be creating stereotypes about themselves by behaving in a particular manner. Of course a stereotype obviously can't define each and every person within a particular group or race, so you always have some people within that group who get burned or identified as something they're not. Its human nature to automatically assume things about individuals we don't know based on their appearance, it takes a really enlightened person to go beyond merely whats on the surface. I've been guilty as well when it comes to making judgements purely based on surface observations. Its rarely any easy answers in life, I guess all I can do is just be myself and try to help make improvements where I can.

or a person with no life.

we deal in stereotypes because it is easier for us to do so. You can't tell me i'm not enlightened because i don't take the time to know every street corner bum that tries to wash my window even if i'm waving him off. you can't tell me i'm not enlightened because i don't try to see thru the stereotype everytime a new rap star or basketball star hits the news.

do i apply stereotypes to people that i meet and deal with one to one?? NO, but do i allow my stereotypes to simplify my daily life with people i don't deal with one on one? yes.

that's life. it's not racist, it's convenience.
 

Arkitech

Diamond Member
Apr 13, 2000
8,356
3
76
Originally posted by: LeeTJ
Originally posted by: Arkitech
Wow, its a lot of interesting comments and experiences here. I appreciate the postive remarks but now I kinda feel like a chump for even bringing this up. I really don't do a lot of complaining, I'm the kind of guy who usually tries to change things before I complain about them.

But anyway I was kinda thinking about stereotypes and racial attitudes and it forced me to face some harsh truths. First off what exactly is a stereotype, I know this is probably a long shot from a technical definition but a stereotype is usually a description or grouping of a person or people based on their race, status or background. With that definition in mind I realized that in some cases certain stereotypes may actually have some elements of truth. I won't go into any details but in some cases people may actually be creating stereotypes about themselves by behaving in a particular manner. Of course a stereotype obviously can't define each and every person within a particular group or race, so you always have some people within that group who get burned or identified as something they're not. Its human nature to automatically assume things about individuals we don't know based on their appearance, it takes a really enlightened person to go beyond merely whats on the surface. I've been guilty as well when it comes to making judgements purely based on surface observations. Its rarely any easy answers in life, I guess all I can do is just be myself and try to help make improvements where I can.

or a person with no life.

we deal in stereotypes because it is easier for us to do so. You can't tell me i'm not enlightened because i don't take the time to know every street corner bum that tries to wash my window even if i'm waving him off. you can't tell me i'm not enlightened because i don't try to see thru the stereotype everytime a new rap star or basketball star hits the news.

do i apply stereotypes to people that i meet and deal with one to one?? NO, but do i allow my stereotypes to simplify my daily life with people i don't deal with one on one? yes.

that's life. it's not racist, it's convenience.


you're getting the wrong message, sure we use stereotypes but the whole point of this thread is to not negatively bias people based on stereotypes