Beheading, Rape, Torture, Murder <<-->> Keep the Women in check The job of the "Fedayeen Saddam,"

Discussion in 'Politics and News' started by dahunan, Mar 27, 2003.

  1. dahunan

    dahunan Lifer

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    Fact Sheet
    Office of International Women's Issues
    Washington, DC
    March 20, 2003

    Iraqi Women Under Saddam's Regime: A Population Silenced


    Situation for Women in Saddam's Iraq
    In 1979, immediately upon coming to power, Saddam Hussein silenced all political opposition in Iraq and converted his one-party state into a cult of personality. Since then, his regime has systematically executed, tortured, imprisoned, raped, terrorized, and repressed the Iraqi people. Iraq is a nation rich in culture, with a long history of intellectual and scientific achievement, especially among its women. However, Saddam Hussein's brutal regime has silenced the voices of Iraq's women, along with its men, through violence and intimidation.

    In Iraq under Saddam, if you are a woman, you could face:

    Beheading. Under the pretext of fighting prostitution, units of "Fedayeen Saddam," the paramilitary organization led by Uday Hussein, Saddam's eldest son, have beheaded in public more than 200 women throughout the country, dumping their severed heads at their families' doorsteps. Many families have been required to display the victim's head on their outside fences for several days. These barbaric acts were carried out in the total absence of any proper judicial procedures and many of the victims were not engaged in prostitution, but were targeted for political reasons. For example, Najat Mohammad Haydar, an obstetrician in Baghdad, was beheaded after criticizing the corruption within health services. (Amnesty International Report, Iraq: Systematic Torture of Political Prisoners, August 2001; Iraqi Women's League in Damascus, Syria)

    Rape. The Iraqi Government uses rape and sexual assault of women to achieve the following goals: to extract information and forced confessions from detained family members; to intimidate Iraqi oppositionists by sending videotapes showing the rape of female family members; and to blackmail Iraqi men into future cooperation with the regime. Some Iraqi authorities even carry personnel cards identifying their official "activity" as the "violation of women's honor." (U.S. Department of State, Country Reports on Human Rights Practices-2001, March 2002; Iraq Research and Documentation Project, Harvard University)


    Torture. The Iraqi Government routinely tortures and kills female dissidents and the female relatives of Iraqi oppositionists and defectors. Victims include Safiyah Hassan, the mother of two Iraqi defectors, who was killed after publicly criticizing the Iraqi Government for killing her sons after their return to Iraq. Women in Saddam's jails are subjected to the following forms of torture: brutal beatings, systematic rape, electrical shocks, and branding. (U.S. Department of State, Country Reports on Human Rights Practices-2001, March 2002; U.S. Department of State, Iraq: A Population Silenced, December 2002)



    Murder. In 1990, Saddam Hussein introduced Article 111 into the Iraqi Penal Code in a calculated effort to strengthen tribal support for his regime. This law exempts men who kill their female relatives in defense of their family's honor from prosecution and punishment. The UN Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women reported that more than 4,000 women have been victims of so-called "honor killings" since Article 111 went into effect. (UN Commission on Human Rights, Report of the Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women, January 2002)

    U.S. Support for Iraqi Women
    All people deserve to live in freedom, including the men and women of Iraq. On March 6, 2003, a group of free Iraqi women met with Vice President Dick Cheney, National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice, Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz, Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs Paula Dobriansky, and Ambassador at Large for a Free Iraq Zalmay Khalilzad. The women shared their experiences under Saddam's reign of terror. As this group made clear, Iraqi women are eager to participate in the process of building a peaceful, democratic post-Saddam society. They want their society to once again be based on progressive Iraqi traditions and values. They believe in the universal principles of human rights.
    As in Afghanistan, the United States Government is prepared to help Iraqis with the priorities and projects that they identify as the best way to achieve their goals. We will continue to meet with Iraqi women and exchange ideas about their path forward. As Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs Paula Dobriansky stated after her recent meeting with a group of free Iraqi women: "It is clear that the women of Iraq have a critical role to play in the future revival of their society. They bring skills and knowledge that will be vital to restoring Iraq to its rightful place in the region and in the world."
    [End]





    http://www.state.gov/g/wi/rls/18877.htm
     
  2. dahunan

    dahunan Lifer

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    Interesting nobody wanted to comment on this... Honestly, should I post this in the anti-war threads? :)
     
  3. rickn

    rickn Diamond Member

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    here they are in action

    that link is not for the squeemish. first link at the top shows a movie of his henchmen in action, although it is older footage. this reguarly goes on in Iraq. Must be quite a terrified population.
     
  4. AmerDoux

    AmerDoux Senior member

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    Barbara Walters had those four Iraqi ladies on the other night and they have done previous interviews too.

    I dont think there are any doubts about how reprehensible Saddam and his regime are.

    I think that what they have talked about is so overwhelmingly horrible that our first reaction is to shy away from it.
     
  5. Morph

    Morph Banned

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    Women are repressed throughout the Middle East, not just Iraq. No doubt, these are horrible things if they are in fact as widespread as this article implies. Not really an objective source though. It's in the best interest of the State Dept and these expatriot Iraqi women to make Saddam's regime out to be as horrible as possible. I'm not saying that this stuff isn't true, just that it may be exaggerated somewhat.

    Here's another viewpoint:

    Iraq's Little Secret

     
  6. Judgement

    Judgement Diamond Member

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    Yea, but this doesn't contribute to the reasons for taking Saddam out of power.... we should keep protesting so the women can keep suffering needlessly :disgust:[​IMG]:frown:
     
  7. Chadder007

    Chadder007 Diamond Member

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    This is what really makes me mad at the AntiWar people. By wanting to keep "peace" by stopping us from stopping them. They are the people who allow this to happen, the ones who truely DO NOT CARE.
     
  8. Nitemare

    Nitemare Lifer

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    Maybe they would like for us to ship them over there, so they can demonstrate in front of a more favorable crowd
     
  9. conjur

    conjur No Lifer

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    No they care, but they just don't like the way Bush has gone about the removal of Saddam and that makes them appear apathetic toward the Iraqi populace. Now, if he'd gotten UN approval (highly doubtful given the economic ties of France with Iraq and a guaranteed veto) or at least waited longer and garnered more international support, leaving France wavering in the wind as the sole objector, then there would be more support for the forced removal of Saddam.

    I understand Bush's push to move quickly as it prevented Saddam from readying his troops at places like Umm Qasr and Basra. Saddam is now pretty much trapped in and around Baghdad while the coalition forces will control the rest of Iraq. This allows greater flexibility to take out the Republican Guard with a much lower loss of life. I think the whole UN Resolution 1441 was a joke and should never have been considered. This should have been enough.