Question Asus Prime H670-Plus D4

CyclicUser

Junior Member
Feb 16, 2021
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Just to expand on this. I am not a gamer and I am not an overclocker. My goal in building this computer is to build a reasonably powerful computer that is dependable, and most importantly, has long term endurance. I want to use components that are well within their design parameters. I have had good luck with Asus boards and this board is reported to have 8 way power to the VRM. I am assuming this is sufficient to run an I7 12700, but this is an assumption.
In all likelihood, this will be the last computer I build.
 

Why_Me

Member
Mar 31, 2022
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Just to expand on this. I am not a gamer and I am not an overclocker. My goal in building this computer is to build a reasonably powerful computer that is dependable, and most importantly, has long term endurance. I want to use components that are well within their design parameters. I have had good luck with Asus boards and this board is reported to have 8 way power to the VRM. I am assuming this is sufficient to run an I7 12700, but this is an assumption.
In all likelihood, this will be the last computer I build.
That board has weak VRM's.
 

Tech Junky

Senior member
Jan 27, 2022
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I tend to stick with MSI or ASRock. For my 12700k I used ASRock Steel legend z690 and it's humming along nicely.
 

CyclicUser

Junior Member
Feb 16, 2021
16
5
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"Asus boards come in all shape and sizes. Some good, some not so good. That particular board has poor VRM's"

How so?
 

Why_Me

Member
Mar 31, 2022
69
40
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"Asus boards come in all shape and sizes. Some good, some not so good. That particular board has poor VRM's"

How so?
That board has a 8 power phase design with no DrMOS and you expect it to handle an i7 that hits 210 watts when in turbo boost mode. What's going to happen is that cheap board with cheap VRM's is going to throttle down once it warms up. Look for a LGA1700 board with better VRM's ... there's plenty out there.
 

CyclicUser

Junior Member
Feb 16, 2021
16
5
41
"That board has a 8 power phase design with no DrMOS and you expect it to handle an i7 that hits 210 watts when in turbo boost mode. What's going to happen is that cheap board with cheap VRM's is going to throttle down once it warms up. Look for a LGA1700 board with better VRM's ... there's plenty out there."

So the 8 power phase VRM is not rated to handle an I7?
How much power is this 8 power phase VRM rated to handle?
Does a higher number of power phases automatically make a higher rated VRM?
 

Why_Me

Member
Mar 31, 2022
69
40
46
"That board has a 8 power phase design with no DrMOS and you expect it to handle an i7 that hits 210 watts when in turbo boost mode. What's going to happen is that cheap board with cheap VRM's is going to throttle down once it warms up. Look for a LGA1700 board with better VRM's ... there's plenty out there."

So the 8 power phase VRM is not rated to handle an I7?
How much power is this 8 power phase VRM rated to handle?
Does a higher number of power phases automatically make a higher rated VRM?
You want a board with no less than a 10+1 power phase design and make sure it doesn't have weak VRM's. Look at the MSI Pro series boards, MSI Mortars, MSI Tomahawks, Asus Tuff series, etc ...
 

CyclicUser

Junior Member
Feb 16, 2021
16
5
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The I7 12700 is rated at 65W processor base power and 180W Maximum turbo power.
Does anyone else think that the 8 phase VRM on this board is overtaxed powering this chip?
 

Tech Junky

Senior member
Jan 27, 2022
782
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powering this chip?
OEM's design their products based on the specs provided by Intel as a minimum to power their products.

The chipset i.e. Z / H / etc. determine the capabilities the CPU can use.

Power / VRM design is up to the OEM


Stuff like this sways me away from Asus

In my book it's a good idea to go to at least the next level up from the bare minimum when it comes to system design. So, if the board you're looking at has 8 power phases the next up would be 10...

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I think more info is needed on what you're specifically looking for. You have 3 brands in the H670 format / 1 mATX option / 3 of them have a 2.5GE port / Asus has a WIFI card

From a power stand point you would need to dig into them:
H670M Pro RS - 7 phase
H670 Steel Legend - 9 phase
TUF GAMING H670-PRO WIFI D4 - 14+1

I would stick with my ASRock pick with the SL in this series as the middle ground for price/perf. It depends ultimately what else is going in the case and how they stack upon each other.

For the prices you're looking at in the H series you could step into the Z and have all of the options and potentially better power options. Certainly more options overall at this point as well. 6 under $200 vs 4 overall.
 

OlyAR15

Senior member
Oct 23, 2014
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The I7 12700 is rated at 65W processor base power and 180W Maximum turbo power.
Does anyone else think that the 8 phase VRM on this board is overtaxed powering this chip?
It'll be fine. You are overthinking things. You aren't going to be OC'ing that chip. Assuming it will be just a general purpose or gaming pc, it should work fine.
 

CyclicUser

Junior Member
Feb 16, 2021
16
5
41
"It'll be fine. You are overthinking things. You aren't going to be OC'ing that chip. Assuming it will be just a general purpose or gaming pc, it should work fine."

NOW you tell me!
I sent the board back and spent $2,000. on the Opus Magnus Biggus Dickus Z690 board with 32 phase VRM. I'm hoping this will be able to run my Celeron processor.

Seriously though, I was hoping for more than "10 is better than 8 because 10 is bigger than 8".
If every VRM was built exactly the same, with the same controllers and the exact same parts, then we could rely on counting the number of phases, but I don't believe that is the case.
 

Tech Junky

Senior member
Jan 27, 2022
782
246
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@CyclicUser

It's a matter of preference at this point. These boards have been out now for ~6 months and sussing out the issues has happened and reported in purchased reviews, reddit, etc.

H is the middle ground for VRM/Phases
Z will give more options due to higher performance requirements

Weigh the importance of each factor and make the decision based on the evidence to make the decision.

Based on the experience I've seen when looking for different MOBO's I stay away from Asus / Gigabyte and have worked with several MSI / ASRock boards w/o any issues. The money for the features with them is higher when you get into the details of the boards. What might cost $250 with ASRock with the same features on Gigabyte could run $400+. There's also some differences in approach between OEM's as I've only spotted a native Gen5 M2 port on a ASRock Velocita whereas all others are planning on users using M2 converters and taking up the coveted PCI slot.

Digging deep into the specs of these board options will reveal things that might be of interest now and in the future.
 

CyclicUser

Junior Member
Feb 16, 2021
16
5
41
As an aside to this, you might find it amusing to know that I am using a computer that I built in 2010. It uses an Asus M4A77TD motherboard with an AMD Phenom II x4 955 black edition chip. This is my every day computer. I have basically run this computer every day since 2010. I have other workstations that I use for specific purposes, but this has been my every day computer for the last 12 years. This new computer will be its replacement.
If I remember correctly, the Phenom II six core chip was the chip that was frying boards back then. This brought on further awareness of the importance of VRM's.
 

BonzaiDuck

Lifer
Jun 30, 2004
15,308
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8-phase power design is about average for some boards between low tier and mid-tier. Look for 10+1 as someone mentioned, or 12-phase power design.
 

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