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Question ASROCK B450M HDV and GTX 1660 SUPER OC

Oscarruiz15

Junior Member
Jun 12, 2020
9
0
6
Hello, I put together a pc with the following characteristics:
AMD Ryzen 5 3600 processor
RAM 8GB (3000) DDR4
MB ASROCK B450M HDV R.4
GTX 1660 SUPER OC graphics card
COOLER MASTER MWE V2 650W 80 PLUS BRONZE Power Supply

It turns out that I have not been able to release it yet, I had previously purchased a 600W EVGA source but when the assembly was finished, it did not give an image. I took it to guarantee and they told me that the source had been defective, then they gave me the option to change for the COOLER 650, with this source if it gives an image when turning on the PC but it takes between 10-15 seconds, I asked them why this and they told me that it was already because the MB was one of the most basic, at the moment of turning on the board on the card is the problem, how true is this? Thank you.

I am new to this forum, I do not know where you should go this topic and my english is not very good, a thousand apologies
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
50,736
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Honestly, that's fairly decent kit, if a bit low-budget for the mobo.

If your only concern is POST speed on a cold-boot, then that's just kind of the way that the Ryzen platform IS. It does boot slower than Intel, although in my experience, once booted to Windows, it does run faster/smoother than comparably-priced or specced Intel rigs.

(I have a Ryzen R5 3600 CPU in this rig currently, on an Asus B450-F ROG STRIX Gaming ATX mobo, with 32GB of DDR4-3600 Trident RGB RAM.)

Oh, possibly, some of your boot-up time is due to "RAM training", see if maybe you can shut that off in CPU or DRAM options in the ASRock BIOS. (I had that option in my older ASRock AB350M Pro4 boards.) Personally, I leave it on, if it assures better RAM compatibility.

Also, did you remember to set XMP and DRAM voltage properly in BIOS too, to correspond with your RAM?
 

Oscarruiz15

Junior Member
Jun 12, 2020
9
0
6
Oh, possibly, some of your boot-up time is due to "RAM training", see if maybe you can shut that off in CPU or DRAM options in the ASRock BIOS. (I had that option in my older ASRock AB350M Pro4 boards.) Personally, I leave it on, if it assures better RAM compatibility.

Also, did you remember to set XMP and DRAM voltage properly in BIOS too, to correspond with your RAM?
Could you explain how I do this? Thank you
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
50,736
6,251
126
Under the CPU or DRAM settings, there should be a setting for "DRAM Training at Boot", set that to DISABLED. There should be setting under DRAM, called "XMP", enable that to "Profile 1", and then possibly you may have to set the clock speed besides, set the speed to be what is marked on your DIMMs/package. If setting XMP didn't set the DRAM voltage (under Voltages), then set that to 1.35V too.
 

Oscarruiz15

Junior Member
Jun 12, 2020
9
0
6
Under the CPU or DRAM settings, there should be a setting for "DRAM Training at Boot", set that to DISABLED. There should be setting under DRAM, called "XMP", enable that to "Profile 1", and then possibly you may have to set the clock speed besides, set the speed to be what is marked on your DIMMs/package. If setting XMP didn't set the DRAM voltage (under Voltages), then set that to 1.35V too.
And this will not affect the mb? Future damage or something?
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
50,736
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It shouldn't damage the mobo or the CPU or the RAM at all. However, there is no guarantee that your particular rig will run at XMP memory speeds, if it doesn't, it may triple-POST, then reset, then reboot, and then your DRAM clock will be at stock.

You can use CPU-Z (the Memory tab), inside Windows, to check your DRAM clock. If it defaults, then your RAM speed will be 2133, and you physical DRAM clock that CPU-Z reports, will be HALF of that, or 1066. If your RAM is XMP-specified for 3200 operation, and it's working, then it will report a DRAM clock of 1600 (+/- 5%).
 

Oscarruiz15

Junior Member
Jun 12, 2020
9
0
6
It shouldn't damage the mobo or the CPU or the RAM at all. However, there is no guarantee that your particular rig will run at XMP memory speeds, if it doesn't, it may triple-POST, then reset, then reboot, and then your DRAM clock will be at stock.

You can use CPU-Z (the Memory tab), inside Windows, to check your DRAM clock. If it defaults, then your RAM speed will be 2133, and you physical DRAM clock that CPU-Z reports, will be HALF of that, or 1066. If your RAM is XMP-specified for 3200 operation, and it's working, then it will report a DRAM clock of 1600 (+/- 5%).
Well, when my pc arrives I will test it, they just sent the guarantee, thank you.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
50,736
6,251
126
I just built a rig with that mobo (ASRock B450M HDV R4.0), and yes, it does boot slightly slow. Longer if you've cleared CMOS, or if it's not booting correctly. I went through a lot trying to OC an Athlon 3000G in that board. (Thread in Motherboards forum.) Finally was successful, and I have it running at 3900Mhz @ 1.3000V, with DDR4-3200 Team Group Vulcan Z RAM running @ XMP 3200 speed.

(I'm posting this from that rig right now, as a matter of fact.)

Edit: I've got a Gigabyte GTX 1650 4G GDDR5 ITX single-fan GPU in there right now, too, with Win10 Pro 64-bit 2004 installed.
 
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