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fuzzybabybunny

Moderator<br>Digital & Video Cameras
Moderator
Jan 2, 2006
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Originally posted by: Anubis
you still didnt andswr my question there mr photo know it all
I never said I would (or could) answer all photo questions ;)

And to tell you the truth I haven't even read through the whole thread.

Scheimpflug principle

I have no idea. It probably never applied to me so I never learned it :(
 

keeleysam

Diamond Member
Feb 8, 2005
8,131
0
0
Originally posted by: fuzzybabybunny
Originally posted by: keeleysam
I have a Rebel XT. I have a prospective buyer at a price point where it'd only cost me about $100 to upgrade to the XTi.

Why do you consider it a downgrade and should I do it?
Ehh.... the new sensor is nice and all, and so is the ultrasonic anti-dust thing and larger buffer, but IMO some of the "improvements" have gone kinda backwards.

Getting rid of the small status LCD panel IMO was a big mistake :(

Keeping the small and dim viewfinder instead of replacing it with a higher quality pentaprism (like every other DSLR has) was also a mistake.

The above two really irk me for some reason, but I admit that I'm in the minority. Getting an upgrade for only $100 seems like a good deal, so I would go with it, as long as you can live with the loss of the small status LCD and the same stupid viewfinder.
I almost never use the second LCD on the back (only to change between shooting modes, like multiple, one, and timer), so I guess I'll do it.
 

foghorn67

Lifer
Jan 3, 2006
11,883
50
91
You know the lcd dims when your eye is on the viewfinder. At first this was an issue, but I don't think it will be an issue for me.
But I am getting out of the Rebel kick, I love my XT, but I must go 20-30d for the next step.
The XTi has the 30d AF system. Pretty quick and precise for a little rebel at 700 bucks. That will make it the fastest AF system in any entry level camera.
 

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
101,739
6,077
126
Originally posted by: spike spiegal

As for the Rebel XT, it's a great camera, but for entry level you might want to take a look at Pentax's new digital K-1000 when it hits the street. Pentax has been using much better viewfinders than Nikon or Canon, with the 20D and 30D not being nearly as easy to use. I'd have no problem trading in my 10D for the new Pentax, and it's not about megapixels.
the k100D does not use that same excellent pentaprism. rather it uses a pentamirror with some 'natural brite matte II' screen. not sure how it compares.

saving $300 on the camera and spending that on glass might be a better choice than the rebel xti. i'm debating it in my head.
 

DeafeningSilence

Golden Member
Jul 2, 2002
1,874
1
0
Originally posted by: fuzzybabybunny
Originally posted by: keeleysam
I have a Rebel XT. I have a prospective buyer at a price point where it'd only cost me about $100 to upgrade to the XTi.

Why do you consider it a downgrade and should I do it?
Ehh.... the new sensor is nice and all, and so is the ultrasonic anti-dust thing and larger buffer, but IMO some of the "improvements" have gone kinda backwards.

Getting rid of the small status LCD panel IMO was a big mistake :(

Keeping the small and dim viewfinder instead of replacing it with a higher quality pentaprism (like every other DSLR has) was also a mistake.

The above two really irk me for some reason, but I admit that I'm in the minority. Getting an upgrade for only $100 seems like a good deal, so I would go with it, as long as you can live with the loss of the small status LCD and the same stupid viewfinder.
I've agreed with most of what you've said in this thread, until now. Of your two complaints which result in your "downgrade" rating, one of them (the viewfinder) is actually a constant, so that can be thrown out. And the combination of two LCDs into one is an interesting idea, and it may be nice or it may not. It shouldn't be too much of a nuisance, since it turns off when you put the camera to your face and turns back on when you take it away. But other than that, everything is an upgrade. The dust removal system is quite slick. The improved autofocus system is quite a boost. The LCD is approximately twice the size of the old main LCD, and is 40% brighter than on ANY OTHER Canon camera. Increased megapixels and burst depth are just bonus. There are other minor improvements as well, that are nice touches... supposedly the back-button menus have been streamlined, and the file folders on the memory card now hold 10,000 pictures each, instead of 100. So personally, I don't consider it a downgrade. Anything but!
 

kami333

Diamond Member
Dec 12, 2001
5,110
2
76
Originally posted by: fuzzybabybunny
Originally posted by: DeafeningSilence
Originally posted by: fuzzybabybunny

DurocShark also had a good point with Pentax and Sony's DSLRs having built-in IS, so every lens has IS. Sigma, Tamron, and Tokina make mounts for these also, so the lens lineups are still extensive.

The choice is up to you. There are a lot of good options out there. I personally don't think Canon will come out with a body with built-in IS anytime soon, as this would cut into their own market for Canon IS lenses.
Canon addressed this recently (in their full-frame sensor whitepaper, I think). In-camera Image Stabilization requires physical movement of the sensor. For short (wide) focal lengths, a little movment does the trick. But that's not where IS is needed. For long focal lengths, the sensor may need to move several millimeters, which isn't practical. So their view is that in-camera IS will never be as effective as IS that's built into the telephoto lenses.
See, that's what I thought too! But apparently someone said that in real life, in-camera IS works quite well for telephoto lenses too. Apparently there are some people on dpreview who had a discussion about this, with their own personal experiences.

Regardless, I'd still rather have in-camera IS, even with a relatively shorter lens, than no IS at all. Sometimes I wish I could solidly handhold my 50mm at 1/10s and longer, without having to resort to using a wider aperture or upping the ISO.
Here's a test someone did with their K100D, not very useful but it's funny.
 

fuzzybabybunny

Moderator<br>Digital & Video Cameras
Moderator
Jan 2, 2006
10,455
33
91
Originally posted by: DeafeningSilence
So personally, I don't consider it a downgrade. Anything but!
Right. Like I stated, it's a personal opinion. I admit that I'm in the minority, without question.

Even though the viewfinder is a constant, I personally consider it a downgrade because a larger viewfinder should be expected, a no-brainer addition, a required addition, and yet they didn't put it in...

I find the quality of the viewfinder absolutely paramount to a camera. I mean, it's the thing that you look through... if it's too small or dim it's hard to judge focus, and it's not fun to look though. I often want to ditch my XT and go full frame for this reason alone. I'll even go so far as to say that having a full frame viewfinder will bring more joy to my shooting, which is really what photography is about for me.

As for the small status LCD, not having it would be a pain for me because I use it a lot, especially in situations like concerts or plays where the main LCD lighting up would be a distraction to others. I mean, all DSLRs have this small status LCD. To not have it is making the Rebel more P&S-like, IMO.

Is the XTi an upgrade? Heck yes for most people. Does it have a lot of nifty features? Definitely. Is it worth the upgrade price? That's individual opinion. Is it a better upgrade than Canon's 20D to 30D? IMO definitely.

The anti-dust and larger RAW buffer would be the greatest selling points for me. I often run out of buffer when shooting RAW, which is annoying, and having the anti-dust sensor would save me space in my camera bag because I wouldn't have to carry around a blower.

10MP - awesome!
anti-dust - great!
larger buffer - sweet!
larger LCD - cool!
no more status LCD - doh!
same stupid viewfinder - NOOOOOOOO!!!!

Basically, for me, I'd rather spend the money I would spend towards the XTi upgrade towards a camera with a larger viewfinder, like the 5D or a 1D series camera.
 

fire400

Diamond Member
Nov 21, 2005
5,204
21
81
what grahpics card is best suitable for entry level photoshoppers who just want to experiment before they think about making digital imaging photography on the computer a hobby?

as most of us just want the cheapest route before we cash in our pay checks?
 

fuzzybabybunny

Moderator<br>Digital & Video Cameras
Moderator
Jan 2, 2006
10,455
33
91
Originally posted by: fire400
what grahpics card is best suitable for entry level photoshoppers who just want to experiment before they think about making digital imaging photography on the computer a hobby?

as most of us just want the cheapest route before we cash in our pay checks?
You actually don't really need all that crazy of a graphics card. A $50 AGP card would do. Most of the computing requirements are a fast CPU, LOTS of RAM (1GB minimum, 2GB recommended IMO), and a quick hard drive for the swap file.
 

fuzzybabybunny

Moderator<br>Digital & Video Cameras
Moderator
Jan 2, 2006
10,455
33
91
Originally posted by: PELarson
why do I only get pictures of eyeballs?
Use your camera's macro mode or a macro lens. If you're doing your own eyeball, it's all trial and error. Look into the lens and just start taking pictures.
 

fuzzybabybunny

Moderator<br>Digital & Video Cameras
Moderator
Jan 2, 2006
10,455
33
91
Originally posted by: KK
Originally posted by: KK
I'm looking for the best compact P&S. What would you recommend and why?
digital of course
It's a personal choice. Look on camera review sites and compile a list of the features you want most in a camera, then get the camera that most closely matches that list in capabilities.

For example, if low noise high ISO is paramount, the Fuji F10 would be a good (actually only) choice.
 

lozina

Lifer
Sep 10, 2001
11,707
5
0
Originally posted by: fuzzybabybunny


2. OMG strawberries are sooooooooo good! So are blackberries and raspberries! I like to mix the latter into my cereal in the mornings, and I like to nibble on strawberries, the small and sweet ones, not the big big ones. I once ate so many strawberries that I got really really sick and I had to pass out :(
Strawberries are among the most sprayed fruits in commercial agriculture- they have to be in order to get decent yield. If you ate a sufficient amount it's probably all those concentrated pesticides that went to your head and caused you to pass out ;)
 

Tom

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
13,293
1
76
What are some affordable studio lights ? Preferably not too big.

I think i read that 3 light sources are good for indoor still-life type shots. For taking photos of stuff for a catalog for example.




 

fuzzybabybunny

Moderator<br>Digital & Video Cameras
Moderator
Jan 2, 2006
10,455
33
91
Originally posted by: lozina
Originally posted by: fuzzybabybunny


2. OMG strawberries are sooooooooo good! So are blackberries and raspberries! I like to mix the latter into my cereal in the mornings, and I like to nibble on strawberries, the small and sweet ones, not the big big ones. I once ate so many strawberries that I got really really sick and I had to pass out :(
Strawberries are among the most sprayed fruits in commercial agriculture- they have to be in order to get decent yield. If you ate a sufficient amount it's probably all those concentrated pesticides that went to your head and caused you to pass out ;)
OMG I must've ate like 60 strawberries!


Weeee!!!
 

GrantMeThePower

Platinum Member
Jun 10, 2005
2,940
2
0
Wow! Killer thread! Well done and thank you to fuzzybabybunny and everyone else.

I'm still shooting on the original Digital Rebel. (no XT). I'm starting to think about upgrading. What do you think i should do? 20D or new XTi? I know there is also the 30D, isn't there?

Anyway i'll keep reading this thread. Good info here.
 

virtuamike

Diamond Member
Oct 13, 2000
7,845
13
81
Originally posted by: Tom
What are some affordable studio lights ? Preferably not too big.

I think i read that 3 light sources are good for indoor still-life type shots. For taking photos of stuff for a catalog for example.
Oh oh I'll take this one.

The smaller your set, the smaller the coverage you'll need. Consequently, you won't need the biggest and best in terms of lights. For still-life product shots, just plain flashes like Nikon SB-24/28 will be good enough. Your lights will be much closer to your subjects than shooting portraits, so it'll be plenty of output. And they're cheap enough that going with 3-5 light setups won't cost you too much.

I do recommend playing with light modifiers and reflectors. The drawback of flashes is that there aren't as many available modifiers to be bought, but you can get creative. Make your own snoots, softboxes, and diffuser panels.

Good read

Now if you're shooting people, that's totally different. Get ready to spend . . .
 

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