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Brentx

Senior member
Jun 15, 2005
350
0
0
I will be shooting probably almost all scenarios.

I have a wedding coming up that someone wants me to shoot in black and white. Then this winter I will be doing photos for the one of the local high Schools basketball programs.

Me personally, when I want to relax, I like to go outside and shoot. Whether that means taking a drive to downtown Milwaukee and shooting the city, or going out to Door County or LaCrosse to get some awesome nature shots is up to me.

So pretty much I will be looking at a camera that will do good in all different scnarios. Now that I think of it... I would probably want to go with a Nikon D70 instead of the D50.

So what would your guys recommendation be between the Nikon D70 and the Rebel XT?
 

virtuamike

Diamond Member
Oct 13, 2000
7,845
13
81
Originally posted by: Brentx
I will be shooting probably almost all scenarios.

I have a wedding coming up that someone wants me to shoot in black and white. Then this winter I will be doing photos for the one of the local high Schools basketball programs.

Me personally, when I want to relax, I like to go outside and shoot. Whether that means taking a drive to downtown Milwaukee and shooting the city, or going out to Door County or LaCrosse to get some awesome nature shots is up to me.

So pretty much I will be looking at a camera that will do good in all different scnarios. Now that I think of it... I would probably want to go with a Nikon D70 instead of the D50.

So what would your guys recommendation be between the Nikon D70 and the Rebel XT?
Another option is to wait for the D80. Or get a used S3. Or a used 20D. Or a used D2h. There are plenty of options the higher up you go. Figure out your budget and draw the line.

Though if you're getting into sports and wedding photography, I strongly recommend shooting with at least 2 bodies. Sure, zoom lenses make things easier, but in terms of sheer speed you're better off shooting multiple bodies.

And considering the cost of the latest and greatest, don't overlook renting. I needed a 300/2.8 AF-S for a night baseball shoot. Rather than spend $4200 on a new one, I rent one for $70 whenever a shoot calls for it. Don't go overboard. Being broke is no fun.

Oh and some shots from the 300/2.8. Mmmm yummy.

#1
#2
 

Anubis

No Lifer
Aug 31, 2001
78,716
414
126
Explain the Scheinflug principal so that everyone will understand it



GL
 

randay

Lifer
May 30, 2006
11,019
216
106
I got a question, If I bought a canon digitial rebel, would I be able to do macros with the lens that comes with it or do I have to purchase a special lens for macros?
 

virtuamike

Diamond Member
Oct 13, 2000
7,845
13
81
Originally posted by: randay
I got a question, If I bought a canon digitial rebel, would I be able to do macros with the lens that comes with it or do I have to purchase a special lens for macros?
Linky

Depends on what you consider macro. Closest focusing distance is just under a foot, and at 55mm you get about 1:4 magnification. True macro is done at 1:1 and higher, but it's up to you whether or not you need to go that high.

If you want a true macro lens, Canon makes them. If you want to save money and get a closeup lens, Canon makes them. If you want extension rings, Kenko is cheaper.

My advice, invest in a good tripod. You don't need spectacular optics to shoot macro.
 

Dimmu

Senior member
Jun 24, 2005
890
0
0
Originally posted by: fuzzybabybunny
Originally posted by: yllus
Originally posted by: ElFenix
how is the sigma 10-20 f/4-5.6?

would it be a good pair to a tamron 28-75 f/2.8?
That's my plan. :) Already got the Tamron 28-75mm f2.8, looking actively for a Sigma 10-20mm currently. Then later on, a Canon EF 70-200mm f4 L for the long zoom range.
Good plan :)

The 70-200mm f/4L is a nice lens. Very smooth, excellent construction, and very light weight. The lens hood is a pain to get on though because the hood threads are so thin. The sharpness is definitely better than regular consumer zooms, but can't nearly match the sharpness of a prime.

I would highly recommend getting a cheap prime for low light work, something like the Canon 50mm f/1.8. Excellent sharpness at around $50 used and $70 new, very light, and will save your but when the light starts to get dim.
I own the 70-200 f/4L and I absolutely love it! I haven't had any problems with the lens hood like you mentioned, it's gone on as easy as any other that I've used. I also would say that the sharpness of this lens comes close to the sharpness of a prime. Zoom lens tech. has come a long way and is closing the gap between high end zooms and primes, albeit a prime will still have superior color reproduction, sharpness, and contrast for quite some time. But for my purposes and money limitations this was the best bang-for-the-buck lens on the market for my camera.
 

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
101,746
6,097
126
Originally posted by: AkumaX
i thought newer mainstream digital cameras nowadays had RAW?!? why only JPEG!?
i've never seen mainstream p&s digicams come with raw. the closest to it is the canon S30-70 lineup, which is sort of in a class by itself. the S80 dropped raw support, for whatever reason.
 

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
101,746
6,097
126
Originally posted by: DurocShark
Originally posted by: ElFenix
the S80 dropped raw support, for whatever reason.
Because it would be competing with the Sony/Minolta DSLR.
and canon wouldn't want that because?


canon has a big hole in the middle of their lineup, imho. they've got the tiny camera market, they've got the pro dslr market, and they've got the entry dslr market. but they don't have full featured pocketable cameras anymore. S80 got discontinued. hopefully S90 will be out soon, but who knows. maybe they intend for the A series to replace it. there is no G6. the pro1 is really hard to find and at prices that it hardly makes sense


granted, they were the only people making them anyway.
 

FM2n

Senior member
Aug 10, 2005
563
0
0
Originally posted by: fuzzybabybunny
OMG what have I done :(

Other camera people feel free to help da' bunny :)
Any photography question huh?

Ok. So I'm shooting with a Cambo 45 Legend and I'm trying to get Tmax 100 tested for proper exposure index. I'm using a Nikkor 210mm 5.6 with bellows focus set to 8 inches. For the testing I'm photographing a white board illuminted with two tungsten modeling lamp (100watts each). I metered the board for even illumination and it gives me a reading of f/5.6 @ 1/125. How do I make an exposure for Zone I for each ISO. I need to shoot two stops under and one stop over the indicated speed on the box in 1/3 increments.

Any help would be greatly appreciated ;)
 

KK

Lifer
Jan 2, 2001
15,902
4
81
I'm looking for the best compact P&S. What would you recommend and why?
 

Gravity

Diamond Member
Mar 21, 2003
5,685
0
0
I fuji cameras. I was considereing the f30 but the f20 is out now at $100+ discount. If I buy the f20, will I be disappointed?

I am planning to use the camera for the motorcycle journey to document the trip. I don't envision getting too technical, just want to take out of the bag, snap what I see and put it back in and ride.

Thanks,

Gravity
 

Eos

Diamond Member
Jun 14, 2000
3,451
2
81
Originally posted by: FM2n
Originally posted by: fuzzybabybunny
OMG what have I done :(

Other camera people feel free to help da' bunny :)
Any photography question huh?

Ok. So I'm shooting with a Cambo 45 Legend and I'm trying to get Tmax 100 tested for proper exposure index. I'm using a Nikkor 210mm 5.6 with bellows focus set to 8 inches. For the testing I'm photographing a white board illuminted with two tungsten modeling lamp (100watts each). I metered the board for even illumination and it gives me a reading of f/5.6 @ 1/125. How do I make an exposure for Zone I for each ISO. I need to shoot two stops under and one stop over the indicated speed on the box in 1/3 increments.

Any help would be greatly appreciated ;)
Bah! Grab some Astia, set ISO at 80, put that Cambo in servo auto focus and Av mode. Set it and shoot it... ;):D
 

PHiuR

Diamond Member
Apr 24, 2001
9,540
2
76
if you are shooting indoors, how do you expose the image so that the background is lit normally and the flash is normal as well...Instead of having bright people and dark backgrounds?
 

spike spiegal

Member
Mar 13, 2006
196
0
0
How do I make an exposure for Zone I for each ISO. I need to shoot two stops under and one stop over the indicated speed on the box in 1/3 increments.
You can start with using a decent, conventional B&W film like FP4 or Plus-X, or even Tri-X -vs-a starved for density range "save the silver" hack like TMX 100. If you can't find the classic films in sheet format, it's because most professionals shooting 4x5 are shooting trannies, scanning, and desaturating. If forced to use film I'd do that anyways given it affords more flexibility.

IMHO - zone system is an excuse not to think, Ansel Adams is WAY over-rated, and you should be processing your film according to contrast range and scene conditions, not faking a linear scale of intensity ranges when B&W film is not linear in the first place.

As for some of the other questions, Walmart is my preferred "online" lab of choice because they will give me my digital pictures in an hour, and they use the exact same machines, chemicals, and papers as Mpix, etc. So, unless you feel the urge to keep Fed-Ex and the UPS guy in business.......

As for zooms vs primes, be aware that the smaller APS sensor in most digital cameras are far pickier than the 24x36mm frame of SLRs of old. My lenses of choice for my Canon dSLR's are all primes because even a cheap 50mm 1.8 will mop the floor with $1,000 L series zooms I've rented or borrowed. Unlike Canon, Nikon is doing something about the issue along with Sigma.

Don't mock point -n- shoot digicams. Some of the newer ones I've used like the Fuji F30 are shockingly good at ISO 800.
 

DurocShark

Lifer
Apr 18, 2001
15,708
5
56
Originally posted by: PHiuR
if you are shooting indoors, how do you expose the image so that the background is lit normally and the flash is normal as well...Instead of having bright people and dark backgrounds?
Depends on the camera. Some have a "fill" mode, or the pictograph of a person standing in front of the sun.

In a manual camera I meter the room and set my exposure to 1-2 stops darker than "proper" exposure. Then I use flash to just fill the person I'm shooting. Usually comes out pretty good, but if the room is really dark you'll still get lots of blurring. In which case I generally bounce off a wall or ceiling to brightening the surroundings as well as the subject. You really need a good flash though. A GN of 80 won't cut it.
 

DurocShark

Lifer
Apr 18, 2001
15,708
5
56
Originally posted by: spike spiegal

IMHO - zone system is an excuse not to think, Ansel Adams is WAY over-rated, and you should be processing your film according to contrast range and scene conditions, not faking a linear scale of intensity ranges when B&W film is not linear in the first place.
The Zone system was AA's attempt and putting the way his mind works onto paper so others can understand it.

I don't like it myself.

In fact, AA's magic was in the darkroom, not in the camera. If you saw how much time he spent processing each image you'd be floored. I have a video biography of him from the 80's that shows how he works.
 

spike spiegal

Member
Mar 13, 2006
196
0
0
As far as actual optical quality goes, Nikon's lenses don't slouch (
Nikon's wide zooms are getting far more respect than Canon right now because Nikon engineered their newer ones specifically for the APS sensor format.

Canon ahs full frame dSLRs - Nikon doesn't, so Nikon doesn't have to build lenses for different size digital sensors.

As for the Rebel XT, it's a great camera, but for entry level you might want to take a look at Pentax's new digital K-1000 when it hits the street. Pentax has been using much better viewfinders than Nikon or Canon, with the 20D and 30D not being nearly as easy to use. I'd have no problem trading in my 10D for the new Pentax, and it's not about megapixels.
 

DeafeningSilence

Golden Member
Jul 2, 2002
1,874
1
0
Originally posted by: FM2n
Originally posted by: fuzzybabybunny
OMG what have I done :(

Other camera people feel free to help da' bunny :)
Any photography question huh?

Ok. So I'm shooting with a Cambo 45 Legend and I'm trying to get Tmax 100 tested for proper exposure index. I'm using a Nikkor 210mm 5.6 with bellows focus set to 8 inches. For the testing I'm photographing a white board illuminted with two tungsten modeling lamp (100watts each). I metered the board for even illumination and it gives me a reading of f/5.6 @ 1/125. How do I make an exposure for Zone I for each ISO. I need to shoot two stops under and one stop over the indicated speed on the box in 1/3 increments.

Any help would be greatly appreciated ;)

f/8 and be there... hahaha
 

DeafeningSilence

Golden Member
Jul 2, 2002
1,874
1
0
Originally posted by: Brentx
Now, I am a beginning phottgrapher, and I want to get into the world of DSLR's. I have had my mind set on the Nikon D50 for a while, but now that I look at it, the Rebel XT is looking like a better choice for the extra money.

The reason I am starting to take Canon's side is because of their lenses. They have that neat USM branding, which I hear can beat Nikon's Nikkor lenses. Also, if I start to take my hobby a bit more serious, I would want to have upgradability available to me, and Canon looks like that is the best route.

Which would you recommend?
IMO: There is more support in the online community for Canon stuff. And overall, I think the sentiment is that Canon is more innovative and more of a technological leader than Nikon. Nikon's hallmark is the quality of their glass, but Canon has some incredibly high-quality lenses as well. Obviously other manufacturers have innovations that beat out Canon here and there. But Canon has the only full-frame DSLRs in the world. Canon is known for having the cleanest (lowest noise) images at high ISOs.

And Canon did exactly what I was expecting them to do last week: introduce an entry-level camera (the Rebel XTi) at an even lower price than the last Rebel, which is going to absolutely destroy the competition. At a time when the DSLR market is growing like never before, Canon has the perfect "gateway drug" to get newbies into the market and locked into the Canon system for life. Ok, I'll get off my fanboy soapbox now. :) But seriously, I'm excited enough about this that I had to buy some Canon stock last week. :D
 

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