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Area President Says Pasta is a Vegetable and Potatoes are Fruit

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whm1974

Diamond Member
Jul 24, 2016
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What about serving tasty fruits and vegetables that kids will actually eat? And have them grow the garden out back to provide them?
 

SMOGZINN

Lifer
Jun 17, 2005
13,144
2,722
136
What about serving tasty fruits and vegetables that kids will actually eat? And have them grow the garden out back to provide them?
Nice idea, but I doubt most schools would have the land area to grow enough fruits and vegetables to feed their students.
 

pcgeek11

Lifer
Jun 12, 2005
17,774
1,868
126
Why wouldn't spiralised courgettes count as vegetables under any regulations? Why would you need new ones for that?

I know right. That is what I'm saying.

Never heard of a courgette, I had to look it up. Cucumber.
 

Bitek

Diamond Member
Aug 2, 2001
9,174
3,167
136
Would like to see a credible scientific explanation of the nutritional value of 'vegetable based flour' (and whether it's actually any better than normal flour).

The only issue that occurs to me about spiralised 'zucchinni' (apart from the fact they are courgettes, dammit!) is that once you chop things up finely like that, do they not rapidly lose nutrients if not consumed fairly soon after? I don't really know, mind.
You can ride your courgettes and aubergines straight to hell!!



I don't see how they would lose their nutrition if you spiralized them on your way down tho.
 

pmv

Diamond Member
May 30, 2008
7,612
2,763
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I don't see how they would lose their nutrition if you spiralized them on your way down tho.
Not at all sure, but I vaguely thought many of the nutrients and vitamins are supposed to disipate if too much of the surface is exposed to air for too long, i.e. once chopped up. That might be one of those myths that's a bit true but hugely exaggerated, though.
 

sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
83,125
8,537
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Not at all sure, but I vaguely thought many of the nutrients and vitamins are supposed to disipate if too much of the surface is exposed to air for too long, i.e. once chopped up. That might be one of those myths that's a bit true but hugely exaggerated, though.
Oxidizing does destroy nutrients and cutting exposes more surface areas that were previously sealed.
 

Bitek

Diamond Member
Aug 2, 2001
9,174
3,167
136
Not at all sure, but I vaguely thought many of the nutrients and vitamins are supposed to disipate if too much of the surface is exposed to air for too long, i.e. once chopped up. That might be one of those myths that's a bit true but hugely exaggerated, though.
Yeah I wonder. Fresh served i wouldn't worry, but cut up in a factory, frozen, then served in a school months later. Bleh
 

pcgeek11

Lifer
Jun 12, 2005
17,774
1,868
126
Well. https://www.britannica.com/story/is-a-tomato-a-fruit-or-a-vegetable

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The age-old question actually has an answer—it's both! Tomatoes are fruits that are considered vegetables by nutritionists. Botanically, a fruit is a ripened flower ovary and contains seeds. Tomatoes, plums, zucchinis, and melons are all edible fruits, but things like maple “helicopters” and floating dandelion puffs are fruits too. For some reason, people got hung up on tomatoes, but the “fruit or vegetable” question could also work for any vegetable with seeds.

Now, nutritionally, the term “fruit” is used to describe sweet and fleshy botanical fruits, and “vegetable” is used to indicate a wide variety of plant parts that are not so high in fructose. In many cultures, vegetables tend to be served as part of the main dish or side, whereas sweet fruits are typically snacks or desserts. Thus, roots, tubers, stems, flower buds, leaves, and certain botanical fruits, including green beans, pumpkins, and of course tomatoes, are all considered vegetables by nutritionists. There is no hard-and-fast rule that clearly designates a botanical fruit as a vegetable, but, given that tomatoes are generally not used in desserts and are closely related to other fruit-vegetables (e.g., eggplants and peppers), it is not too counterintuitive for tomatoes to be classified as vegetables.
 

tcG

Golden Member
Jul 31, 2006
1,202
18
81
If the government wants people to be healthier, maybe they could start by withdrawing subsidies to the commercial seed oil industry and repealing import duties on natural products from abroad.
 
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