Apple Genius Bar repair ripoff.

mxnerd

Diamond Member
Jul 6, 2007
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#1
Apple wants to charge you $1200 ,

but 3rd party repair shop probably will repair it for free.


 
Aug 25, 2001
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#2
And Apple is in the process, or has already, implemented a "security lock-out chip" on (all?) the new MacBooks, such that 3rd-party tech can NO LONGER repair laptops, unless they somehow have access to Apple's proprietary tech tools.
 

cannotchanger

Junior Member
Oct 18, 2018
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#3
been there... had macs since 2007 to the newest MBP with touch bar and never ever buying them again.
 
Feb 25, 2011
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#4
It's less disturbing if you think of it as a $50-100/month computer subscription model. The hardware is disposable.

Some people - including Me-20-Years-Ago - probably think that's more disturbing, but I don't get sentimental about hardware anymore.
 

paperfist

Diamond Member
Nov 30, 2000
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#5
I dunno, my cousin dropped and cracked his Macbook Air screen. Went down to the Apple store said look this is what happened, I'm a big supporter of your product and have been for years and he asked what they could do. So what they did was replace it for free. I'm sure not every Apple store is the same.
 
Oct 9, 1999
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#6
Man, Rossmann's repair videos are so great. It's like NPR's All Things Considered with soldering and intermittent rants. :D
 

Zaap

Diamond Member
Jun 12, 2008
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#7
A friend once had a MacBook that wouldn't boot... I open it for him and it's a faulty SATA connector. I took the SATA connector out of mine, put it in his, and all was well. So no big deal, order the part and everything is golden.

You would think except my friend takes it to the 'genius bar' thing, tells them exactly what's wrong with it, and asks to buy the needed SATA connector. Nope. They insisted it'd be $100 just to have a tech look at it. My friend told them he didn't need anyone to look at it, just sell him the SATA cable. Nope. Impossible.

So he calls Apple, goes through the run around with several levels of support- same answers $100 min repair. He declares he'll give up on the Mac and go PC if they're going to hold his MacBook hostage like this.

Finally, some tech guy said "fine". Charged him $8. A few days later his SATA connector arrived.

I'd say it sums up Apple except I've had exactly the opposite experience several times. Had some problems with my 2012 Retina MacBook Pro back in 2012 when I got it... Apple just handed me a brand new one, no hassle. That one I gave away not long ago but its still going strong for a friend.

My guess is its a combination of luck of the draw as well as attitude, either courteous or 'I'm not taking your crap'. My approach is always courteous unless given direct reason to be the later.
 
Sep 11, 2017
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#8
The name Apple translates directly to 'rip off'. I thought everyone knew this. :)
 

gsethi

Diamond Member
Feb 28, 2002
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#9
I have a mid-2014 Macbook Pro Retina. I have been using Dual-boot with windows and MacOS. Earlier this year, laptop would not boot into MacOS (black screen). It would boot into Windows but the screen would show vertical lines. I tried external monitors using hdmi but still would not be able to boot into macOS. Even did the resets and nothing. I took it to Apple store for a quote to fix it and they quoted me min. of $600 to replace the Logic board (or ~800+ to replace the screen). As per tech, it was either bad logic board or bad screen and they were not sure.

I came back home, thinking of getting a new macbook next week. During a free evening couple of days later, I decided to open up the macbook (since it was going to be thrown away) and noticed a loose display cable going to the screen. I unplugged the cable and plugged it back properly and the laptop has been working properly ever since. It booted right back to macOS without any issue this time. It was pretty shocking that the tech did not notice the loose cable when diagnosing it at the Apple store.

Yes, it did leave me a sour taste, however, we still keep on purchasing Apple products. Family is an apple Household (except for 1 windows desktop).
 

Harry_Wild

Senior member
Dec 14, 2012
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#10
For their mobile devices like iPhones, iPads and others, if they are older then 3 years old, repairs like battery replacement, they will just swap your device for a refurbished one!
 

sonitt

Junior Member
Dec 19, 2018
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#11
Goes to show that some computer technicians do not know what they are doing. I've been lucky. I still have an old 2011 Macbook Pro that I use occasionally.
 
Oct 18, 1999
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#12
I still rock my mid-2009 MBP. Why? Because I can still open it up and pretty much replace everything. Over the years I have replaced the HD to SSD, added more RAM, replaced the battery twice and even the trackpad. This MBP has never seen a "genius". They are a joke. At least at Micro-center the tech call it the "knowledge center".
 
Jan 11, 2006
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#13
My experience has been nothing but but great with Apple and at the Apple Store:

You're not going to believe this, but Apple really rocks (again)!

Also, I just went in last week with two identical 2010 MacBook Pros. One was dead and the other was a used one I had bought to replace the first one. The one I just bought worked great, but was missing a key. I asked if they could take the key from the dead one and put it on the working one. Instead, they took the working one in the back and put a new key on it. It's a little thing, but still more than I asked for.

MotionMan
 

Zaap

Diamond Member
Jun 12, 2008
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#14
^The problem is, your "dead" MacBook Pro may not be. It might just need a .02cent fix that someone like Rossmann (see the OP video) could fix in five minutes, but the 'genius' wouldn't have a clue about or simply would never tell you about.
 
Jan 11, 2006
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#15
^The problem is, your "dead" MacBook Pro may not be. It might just need a .02cent fix that someone like Rossmann (see the OP video) could fix in five minutes, but the 'genius' wouldn't have a clue about or simply would never tell you about.
I always get a second opinion; the guys at uBreakIFix confirmed that it is "dead."

I suppose someone like Rossman could fix it, but I don't know anyone like him in my area.

MotionMan
 

Zaap

Diamond Member
Jun 12, 2008
7,121
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#16
I suppose someone like Rossman could fix it, but I don't know anyone like him in my area.

MotionMan
You shouldn't have to. Apple should be able to do *ACTUAL* repairs of their products, not just push new stuff.
 

fire400

Diamond Member
Nov 21, 2005
5,131
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#17
friend bought $1500 apple macbook from best buy.
he refused to pay for the apple care insurance on the laptop.

the mobo hardware failed within a few months and apple "fixed it."
on second failure, apple refused to touch it, saying it cost more than what they are allowed for standard warranty.
when he asked apple and best buy to help him out within that first year, they both refused without hesitation.

his experience.
 
Oct 18, 1999
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#18
You shouldn't have to. Apple should be able to do *ACTUAL* repairs of their products, not just push new stuff.
They cant as all their crap is just glued/sealed tight. They WANT you to buy either new HW or pay for applecare and they will just swap it with another one.
 
Aug 25, 2001
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#19
he refused to pay for the apple care insurance on the laptop.
when he asked apple and best buy to help him out within that first year, they both refused without hesitation.
That's the problem. With Apple, you's gotta pay dat "protection money" when they ask...
 
Jul 1, 2001
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#20
^The problem is, your "dead" MacBook Pro may not be. It might just need a .02cent fix that someone like Rossmann (see the OP video) could fix in five minutes, but the 'genius' wouldn't have a clue about or simply would never tell you about.
I'd imagine that if you went to a Verizon store or Microsoft store, they would probably deny repair on any device you gave them that had a tripped water damage sensor as well. That doesn't make it right, but it seems to be corporate policy everywhere.

Hell, I once got negative feedback after selling a broken cell phone for parts on eBay because it had a tripped water damage sensor on the logic board. Mind you that this was a broken cell phone that I was selling "as is" for parts.... I guess that the seller was annoyed because his $50 investment on a broken $250 cell phone didn't work out for them :rolleyes:
 

Zaap

Diamond Member
Jun 12, 2008
7,121
38
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#21
I'd imagine that if you went to a Verizon store or Microsoft store, they would probably deny repair on any device you gave them that had a tripped water damage sensor as well. That doesn't make it right, but it seems to be corporate policy everywhere.
Verizon isn't a hardware OEM, so that's not a good example. Microsoft makes the Surface line- I don't know if they run repair operations out of MS stores, but I think they'd refer a customer to an authorized repair center.

None of us have any idea what was wrong with the MacBook in question- that's the whole point. "Geniuses" are useless at diagnosing actual problems and just have "script" solutions that involve spending insane amounts of money.

Rossman explains in the video that common humidity often trips the water sensors in Apple's products. They don't deny servicing the MacBook in the OP video- they try to rip off the customer (the costs listed off are out-freakin'-rageous), when the real problem was a free fix- bending a connector pin back into position.

Apple isn't a mom and pop backroom business- they're one of the largest companies on earth. They could do proper repair solutions for their hardware easily. It's just that's often clearly not their priority- selling people new stuff is.

Also, and even worse, Apple often tosses its weight around throwing lawsuits in the way of third party services that can fix their products. I hope there is soon legislation to make that type of practice illegal. Imagine if car companies did that- put legal roadblocks in the way of your local mechanic from diagnosing and fixing your car, and sued all his part suppliers out of business.Most people would cry bloody murder at that sort of crap, but they put up with it from companies like Apple.
 
Oct 18, 1999
20,775
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#22
Verizon isn't a hardware OEM, so that's not a good example. Microsoft makes the Surface line- I don't know if they run repair operations out of MS stores, but I think they'd refer a customer to an authorized repair center.

None of us have any idea what was wrong with the MacBook in question- that's the whole point. "Geniuses" are useless at diagnosing actual problems and just have "script" solutions that involve spending insane amounts of money.

Rossman explains in the video that common humidity often trips the water sensors in Apple's products. They don't deny servicing the MacBook in the OP video- they try to rip off the customer (the costs listed off are out-freakin'-rageous), when the real problem was a free fix- bending a connector pin back into position.

Apple isn't a mom and pop backroom business- they're one of the largest companies on earth. They could do proper repair solutions for their hardware easily. It's just that's often clearly not their priority- selling people new stuff is.

Also, and even worse, Apple often tosses its weight around throwing lawsuits in the way of third party services that can fix their products. I hope there is soon legislation to make that type of practice illegal. Imagine if car companies did that- put legal roadblocks in the way of your local mechanic from diagnosing and fixing your car, and sued all his part suppliers out of business.Most people would cry bloody murder at that sort of crap, but they put up with it from companies like Apple.
One of the reasons I don't buy their products and even talk people out of it.
 
Jul 1, 2001
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#23
Imagine if car companies did that- put legal roadblocks in the way of your local mechanic from diagnosing and fixing your car, and sued all his part suppliers out of business.Most people would cry bloody murder at that sort of crap, but they put up with it from companies like Apple.
You don't really need to imagine that... it's already happening. Tesla has been making it difficult as hell for "non Tesla certified" garages and body shops to fix their cars for years now.
 

TheStu

Moderator<br>Mobile Devices & Gadgets
Moderator
Sep 15, 2004
11,971
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#24
You don't really need to imagine that... it's already happening. Tesla has been making it difficult as hell for "non Tesla certified" garages and body shops to fix their cars for years now.
Not just cars, John Deere does similar things with their tractors. They are making them ever more complicated and computer dependent and going after farmers that try to fix the equipment themselves.
 

killster1

Diamond Member
Mar 15, 2007
4,387
105
91
#25
My experience has been nothing but but great with Apple and at the Apple Store:

You're not going to believe this, but Apple really rocks (again)!

Also, I just went in last week with two identical 2010 MacBook Pros. One was dead and the other was a used one I had bought to replace the first one. The one I just bought worked great, but was missing a key. I asked if they could take the key from the dead one and put it on the working one. Instead, they took the working one in the back and put a new key on it. It's a little thing, but still more than I asked for.

MotionMan

i went to the apple store with a broken glass iphone 7 plus, they changed the glass for free after all the repair stores quoted me over 200 to do the same with a non oem lcd replacement even tho the LCD was fine and only had cracked teh glass. phone works great almost no wait and very pleased. (phone was even reported lost by the person i purchased from and no problem!*)
 


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