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Question Anyone have experience or advice on overclocking a Q6600?

TubeTote

Senior member
May 11, 2006
410
19
81
Hello all, and thank you for reading. I am in the process of a computer overhaul, but currently stuck waiting for a back ordered GPU to do the build. If anyone is interested here is the thread:


In the meantime, I am thinking that I will try to max out my current machine and keep it for a back up. I have a Q6600 at my disposal and would like to replace the current e5200, then overclock. I'm not looking to be too aggressive and would like to avoid messing with voltages if possible. Motherboard is an Asus P5Q-EM micro ATX. Hoping for an overclock to maybe around 2.75 - 3 GHz (and I know that the Q6600 can go much higher). I have done some research on what settings to use in the BIOS but I only seem to be finding hugely big overclocks with a lot of tweaks. Would rather keep it simple since I don't place much demand on this machine.

Also considering putting an additional 4 GB of RAM in the machine, but have never used four sticks on a motherboard...could this create any problems? I would just do 2 4 GB sticks but in DDR2 they are very hard to come by for a reasonable price. I know to use the same sized sticks, same manufacturer, same timings. Any recommendations as far as speed since I am changing processors?

I greatly appreciate any advice!
 
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rommelrommel

Diamond Member
Dec 7, 2002
3,061
658
146
If you don't want to stretch anything, don't. Just turn up the clock on stock voltages until you induce some instability, and then back down a bit. I had a P5Q something, maybe a deluxe. It overclocked well but I think I had a Q9450 at the end. 4 sticks of ram can be harder to overclock than 2.
 

maddogmcgee

Senior member
Apr 20, 2015
313
179
116
I would strongly suggest not spending any more money or time on that platform. Even postage makes it not worth it, assuming free items.

If you already have all the parts and just want to tinker then go all out and follow one of the guides, the worst than can happen is you destroy your obsolete computer you are replacing.
 

TubeTote

Senior member
May 11, 2006
410
19
81
I would strongly suggest not spending any more money or time on that platform. Even postage makes it not worth it, assuming free items.

If you already have all the parts and just want to tinker then go all out and follow one of the guides, the worst than can happen is you destroy your obsolete computer you are replacing.
LOLOL...now that is one of the best answers I have yet heard in the forums. I am definitely overthinking this (I am often told that). I do just want to tinker and learn some things, and this is just that opportunity...if I f#$k it up, it is no real loss! Thanks for the attitude check.
 

TheELF

Diamond Member
Dec 22, 2012
3,317
408
126
LOLOL...now that is one of the best answers I have yet heard in the forums. I am definitely overthinking this (I am often told that). I do just want to tinker and learn some things, and this is just that opportunity...if I f#$k it up, it is no real loss! Thanks for the attitude check.
There really isn't anything you could do wrong, put the multiplier to 30 and don't change anything else, if you have enough cooling it will go up to 3Ghz when pushed and if you don't have enough cooling it will just go as high as it can.
If your mobo has speedstep it will run at lower clocks when not pushed anyway, so you don't have to worry about high temps either.
 

eek2121

Golden Member
Aug 2, 2005
1,291
1,370
136
Don’t forget that the Core 2 platform has it’s share of security vulnerabilities that will never be patched. It is a great chip, but it’s time is over.
 

Shmee

Memory and Storage, Graphics Cards
Super Moderator
Sep 13, 2008
5,347
995
126
The Q6600 is a decent chip. But if you are going to do this, make sure you have adequate cooling, and you will need to adjust voltages, best not to leave at auto. You will need to test different values at different settings for stability.
 

SPBHM

Diamond Member
Sep 12, 2012
4,998
356
126
3GHz, bumping the FSB to 333, was considered common, in many occasions with stock voltage, that's if it's a g0 and not a b3,
I think going to that point should be safe on most boards, and run with an average cooler, going over that can get tricky,

so try that, fsb to 333, check the ram settings, and maybe you are good to go.

but you probably can get a 45nm quad core for not much, and these are significantly less power hungry at high clocks,
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
17,842
6,816
136
but you probably can get a 45nm quad core for not much, and these are significantly less power hungry at high clocks,
I would like to echo @eek2121 's sentiment that these old chips do have some serious security problems that should not be overlooked. No, there are no patches/microcode updates to fix the problem, either. If @TubeTote is going to have this machine on the Internet, he should be aware that sooner or later he may get Spectred or Meltdowned.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
51,968
6,904
126
I would like to echo @eek2121 's sentiment that these old chips do have some serious security problems that should not be overlooked. No, there are no patches/microcode updates to fix the problem, either. If @TubeTote is going to have this machine on the Internet, he should be aware that sooner or later he may get Spectred or Meltdowned.
That's not even the most serious exploit possible on these platforms (Core2, Intel chipset). You can mess with the APIC and memory registers, to gain Ring0 access from untrusted code. (IIRC)
 

TubeTote

Senior member
May 11, 2006
410
19
81
Hey all, I haven't heard about the security issues before this thread, had no idea. Firewalls, VPN and the like won't help? Yikes. Thank you for the heads up!

What about my current dual core e5200?

Wish that GPU would show up so I can build!
 
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Iron Woode

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 10, 1999
29,099
9,542
136
Hello all, and thank you for reading. I am in the process of a computer overhaul, but currently stuck waiting for a back ordered GPU to do the build. If anyone is interested here is the thread:


In the meantime, I am thinking that I will try to max out my current machine and keep it for a back up. I have a Q6600 at my disposal and would like to replace the current e5200, then overclock. I'm not looking to be too aggressive and would like to avoid messing with voltages if possible. Motherboard is an Asus P5Q-EM micro ATX. Hoping for an overclock to maybe around 2.75 - 3 GHz (and I know that the Q6600 can go much higher). I have done some research on what settings to use in the BIOS but I only seem to be finding hugely big overclocks with a lot of tweaks. Would rather keep it simple since I don't place much demand on this machine.

Also considering putting an additional 4 GB of RAM in the machine, but have never used four sticks on a motherboard...could this create any problems? I would just do 2 4 GB sticks but in DDR2 they are very hard to come by for a reasonable price. I know to use the same sized sticks, same manufacturer, same timings. Any recommendations as far as speed since I am changing processors?

I greatly appreciate any advice!
here is a simple solution for OC'ing the Q6600:

 
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DigDog

Lifer
Jun 3, 2011
12,082
1,295
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i had a E6600, and pushed it to 3.2Ghz. The Q- chips were better fabricated, so your should have no problem reaching at least the same speed, however: 2007-era motherboards were not great, and if yours has been running since then, by now it's probably leaking voltage from all over the place.
S775 motherboards, and DDR2 ram sticks, are prohibitively expensive these days.

Frankly i recommend a cheap ryzen, because you can get a A520 board for $40, ram for $80 and a CPU for under $200 and they will humiliate any Conroe-era chip regardless of the overclock you do.
 
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eek2121

Golden Member
Aug 2, 2005
1,291
1,370
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Hey all, I haven't heard about the security issues before this thread, had no idea. Firewalls, VPN and the like won't help? Yikes. Thank you for the heads up!

What about my current dual core e5200?

Wish that GPU would show up so I can build!
None of that will help. I always recommend users get an modern Athlon or cheap Ryzen rather than continuing to attempt to use these old platforms.
 

TubeTote

Senior member
May 11, 2006
410
19
81
here is a simple solution for OC'ing the Q6600:
Now that is interesting...hard to believe it works without messing anything up! I just might do it that way.

Frankly i recommend a cheap ryzen, because you can get a A520 board for $40, ram for $80 and a CPU for under $200 and they will humiliate any Conroe-era chip regardless of the overclock you do.
None of that will help. I always recommend users get an modern Athlon or cheap Ryzen rather than continuing to attempt to use these old platforms.
Actually, my new build will have a Ryzen 5 3600 (pretty much all new parts other than the case and HDDs). This is really more about putzing around with my current machine while waiting endlessly for my GPUs to arrive (ordered 2 of them) so that I can build the new machine.

I wasn't aware of the security issues with these old processors, so I really appreciate the notice, thanks!
 
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DigDog

Lifer
Jun 3, 2011
12,082
1,295
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security issue??

spectre and meltdown?

As i understand it, those are security issues ONLY for high value targets. if anything, i would advise you to try to avoid the patches, as they will cause a steep drop in performance without any practical benefit, your home PC just isn't going to be the target of a spectre attack.
 
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DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
17,842
6,816
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As i understand it, those are security issues ONLY for high value targets.
That was the assumption when the vulnerabilities first leaked; however, there's at least one pen test toolkit out there with Spectre/Meltdown exploits in it now, which means fully-fledged exploits in the wild are not far behind.


And that was back in March.
 

Iron Woode

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 10, 1999
29,099
9,542
136
Now that is interesting...hard to believe it works without messing anything up! I just might do it that way.





Actually, my new build will have a Ryzen 5 3600 (pretty much all new parts other than the case and HDDs). This is really more about putzing around with my current machine while waiting endlessly for my GPUs to arrive (ordered 2 of them) so that I can build the new machine.

I wasn't aware of the security issues with these old processors, so I really appreciate the notice, thanks!
nothing wrong with putzing around.

I built a win98SE machine with my old socket A parts.

You can still get socket 775 systems for cheap. They are mostly office systems. I have an old Vostro that was given to me for free and it has a Q6600. The board supports 8GB of DDR2 and PCIe video cards.

This kind of tinkering is fun.
 
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bigboxes

Lifer
Apr 6, 2002
33,219
11,409
146
If it's your only working machine, I wouldn't do anything. Wait until you have your new box up and running before you play around with this old build. You can overclock it and it will still be 2021 slow. I wouldn't put any money into it, regardless.
 

Insert_Nickname

Diamond Member
May 6, 2012
4,227
787
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Actually, my new build will have a Ryzen 5 3600 (pretty much all new parts other than the case and HDDs). This is really more about putzing around with my current machine while waiting endlessly for my GPUs to arrive (ordered 2 of them) so that I can build the new machine.
If you have -any- kind of PCIe GPU around, I'd suggest using it. There is probably a long wait ahead yet for those GPUs.

A cheap interim ebay card is also an option.
 
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Hi-Fi Man

Senior member
Oct 19, 2013
601
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It's really disappointing seeing all these nay-sayers. The Q6600 was and is a great chip to OC.

As mentioned earlier, you'll need to bump the FSB up to OC. Default FSB clock is 266MHz (1066MT/s) and the easiest OC is to just bump that to 333MHz (1333MT/s) while leaving the multiplier alone. That will get you 3GHz which most G0 stepping Q6600s can do at stock voltage with some even capable of below stock volts at that frequency. If you have a B3 stepping you may have to overvolt slightly or you can choose to lower the multiplier. The G45 chipset on your board supports 1333MT/s FSB speeds officially so that isn't considered an overclock for the northbridge.
 

graysky

Senior member
Mar 8, 2007
796
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In the future, please tell a bit about the links that are posted.
Itis required as per the CPU forums rules.


esquared
Anandtech Forum Director
 
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