Anyone going to try Linksys WRT300n?

JackMDS

Elite Member
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Oct 25, 1999
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Wow I am going to try it in the near future.

Why?

1. Look at the picture, would you imagine what my neighbor would say when he sees it?

The thing looks like a Goa'uld contraption that was left behind by the Ancients.:thumbsup:

2. Up to 12 times faster than Wireless-G, but also works great with Wireless-G and -B devices .

So I get about 23Mb/sec from my 802.11g, so under similar circumstances I should get 276Mb/sec. :shocked::beer::music:

All I can say is WOW!!!

On the other end, it is probably expensive and if it does not do what it claims I might sitting at the cleaner.:brokenheart:

:sun:
 

Madwand1

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Jan 23, 2006
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It is expensive. The fact that they tout 12x faster than 802.11g a lot, but never come out and give a bps figure makes me suspect that they might mean 12x faster 500m way from the router or something. Also, if they were really serious about the "faster than ethernet" part, shouldn't they have put on gigabit LAN ports? At this price? C'mon.

That said, I guess that the need to support these transfer rates with encryption will also imply better processing power / internal electronics, so they might be better than the cheap stuff for higher speed WAN use as well.

/agree on the antennae. But the Netgear still looks nicer to me.
 

JackMDS

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There is partial fair in the Data papers if you look deep into them.

It states that distance would be x4. Which under certain limited situation it is true.

However if you get 40' - 50' coverage while using it in your "Mansion" do not expect 160' - 200'. :shocked:

Street price around $130 Router + $110 Card.

If History prevails, once all the Entry Level Brand name would sell this type of devices. Expect toward the latter part of 2006, about $80 for the Router + $60 for the card

:sun:
 

elkinm

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Jun 9, 2001
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Has there been any good reviews or comparos between any of the draft N routers yet. How about the older MIMO generations. I have not seen any good comparos but so so many different MIMO standards.

It does look cool, may be not quite goa'uld but pretty close. Remember as we learned from Star Trek Voyager that the computer revolution should not have happened as it was from a crashed ship from the 29'th century so this is just the next step.

The antenna should spin around if it doesn't already.
 

Madwand1

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Jan 23, 2006
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I guess $130 is not that expensive for a bleeding edge router for early adopters. I see $150 on the Linksys linked Best Buy, and thought I'd seen even higher prices elsewhere -- possibly an news article / press release; possibly a complete kit price.

I think I've figured out why it only comes with 10/100 ports. It's so they can continue to market it as "faster than wired".
 

Madwand1

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Netgear Rangemax Next with gigabit "300 Mb/s" - $200
http://www.buy.com/retail/product.asp?sku=202578111&loc=101&sp=1
Without gigabit "270 Mb/s" - $143
http://www.buy.com/retail/product.asp?sku=202558491&loc=101&sp=1

Note also that Netgear is already giving some indications of lack of interoperability -- the above two routers have different wireless chipsets and associated adapters. The lesser product uses the same chipset at Linksys (Broadcom). Linksys has said that they'll change chipsets for other products in order to handle volumes.

Moreover, there seem to be major issues with impact with 802.11g gear -- (1) Interference with 802.11g connectivity (2) Downgraded performance in presence of 802.11g signals. There were two tests published, with problems encountered in both, and there's lots of commentary on those tests. At best, the devices seem to just exceed 100 Mb/s.

Wi-Fi consumers cautioned to wait on new gear
http://news.com.com/2100-7351_3-6064605.html?part=rss&tag=6064605&subj=news

First 802.11n Products Show Standard's Promise
http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,1952659,00.asp

802.11n wireless gear falls short in testing
http://www.eetimes.com/news/semi/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=186700327

On the other hand, the fact that Linksys has released GPL source code for the WRT300n is good news for those who want functionality that might not be present in the box (such as bridging).

http://www.linksysinfo.org/

The following article mentions the upcoming dual band WRT600n from Linksys ($200):

http://www.crn.com/sections/custom/custom.jhtml?articleId=186500513

Based on the interference observed, sticking it out for the dual band / 5 GHz band stuff seems like a good idea to me.
 

elkinm

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Jun 9, 2001
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Originally posted by: Madwand1
Netgear Rangemax Next with gigabit "300 Mb/s" - $200
http://www.buy.com/retail/product.asp?sku=202578111&loc=101&sp=1
Without gigabit "270 Mb/s" - $143
http://www.buy.com/retail/product.asp?sku=202558491&loc=101&sp=1

Note also that Netgear is already giving some indications of lack of interoperability -- the above two routers have different wireless chipsets and associated adapters. The lesser product uses the same chipset at Linksys (Broadcom). Linksys has said that they'll change chipsets for other products in order to handle volumes.

Moreover, there seem to be major issues with impact with 802.11g gear -- (1) Interference with 802.11g connectivity (2) Downgraded performance in presence of 802.11g signals. There were two tests published, with problems encountered in both, and there's lots of commentary on those tests. At best, the devices seem to just exceed 100 Mb/s.

Wi-Fi consumers cautioned to wait on new gear
http://news.com.com/2100-7351_3-6064605.html?part=rss&tag=6064605&subj=news

First 802.11n Products Show Standard's Promise
http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1895,1952659,00.asp

802.11n wireless gear falls short in testing
http://www.eetimes.com/news/semi/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=186700327

On the other hand, the fact that Linksys has released GPL source code for the WRT300n is good news for those who want functionality that might not be present in the box (such as bridging).

http://www.linksysinfo.org/

The following article mentions the upcoming dual band WRT600n from Linksys ($200):

http://www.crn.com/sections/custom/custom.jhtml?articleId=186500513

Based on the interference observed, sticking it out for the dual band / 5 GHz band stuff seems like a good idea to me.

Thanks for the reviews. It looks like Draft-N is a downgrade over the gen-3 products, even the slow gen-3 router when range increases.

Have anyone seen any reviews of Buffalo High Power routers or other long range G to compare to these at long range?
 

JackMDS

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Super Moderator
Oct 25, 1999
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Originally posted by: elkinmHave anyone seen any reviews of Buffalo High Power routers or other long range G to compare to these at long range?
Quote from, http://www.practicallynetworked.com/review.asp?pid=628

"All in all, the WHR-HP-G54 certainly seems to provide better performance than standard 802.11g devices at a similar price, and may even offer advantages over MIMO hardware for certain situations".

One issue the 802.11n is the Antenna. The MIMOs Antenna structure does not lend itself to be fit with replaceable Antenna.

So as an example the new Linksys WRT300n has a 2dbi Antenna and you are stuck with it.

The Buffalo High power 802.11h has a replicable Antenna.

However lets face it a year from now most of us would use the 801.11n. The issue right now is to ?Hold the Horses? until the dust settles.

:sun: