Any way to get 2 dsl lines to my house on two phone lines, and tie them together to form 1?

Discussion in 'Networking' started by MikeMike, Mar 6, 2003.

  1. MikeMike

    MikeMike Lifer

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    My mom's company pays for out second phone line, and when DSL becomes available, they will pay for that. I was wondering if i were to get DSL subscribed on both phone lines, with only one having ISP support (or both if i had to) is there any way to use a router or sumtin to effectively tie them together for double bandwidth? as in 768*2/128*2?

    and what would i need to do that?
     
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  3. JackMDS

    JackMDS Super Moderator<BR>Elite Member
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  4. MikeMike

    MikeMike Lifer

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    i didnt think so, but y not what would keep it from happening?
     
  5. Garion

    Garion Platinum Member

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    When you send a request out to the Internet, you have a source IP for that request. All replies are sent back to that single source IP. Each of your routers has a unique ID - Hence, what goes out that way comes back that way. Most P2P apps only will use one address, too. So, unless you do a lot of web downloads or multiple different P2P's, you're not going to see a huge benefit. A lot of these solutions are best for failover - When one circuit dies, the other might remain.

    The best option is to call your telco and bump the speed on your DSL, unless that's not possible for you.

    - G
     
  6. Fuzznuts

    Fuzznuts Senior member

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    goto www.midcore.co.uk and check out midpoint it willl do what you need i have used it with mulitple isdn and dsl lines at them same time and it works great for things like kazaa where different request are sent out to different ips. not so good for ftp seems to only allow one ftp connection at a time????? great for browsing and dling via http. bascially it works :)
     
  7. her209

    her209 No Lifer

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    ISDN... ummm.
     
  8. bsobel

    bsobel Moderator Emeritus<br>Elite Member

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  9. Dasterdly

    Dasterdly Member

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    I have a Intel Pro/100+ Dual Port Server Adapter and have been thinking about bridging my current DSL line with a cable connection if they ever get around to offering it in my area(TCI then AT&T, and now Comcast all promised to upgrade thier systems for internet connections for the past 5 years.)
    This adapter has a built in 64 bit pci bus to bridge the 2 together. I currently have both hooked up to 1 dsl connection from a router. I am not exactly sure how the load balancing works between the 2 nic's.
    I am not interested in faster web page downloads, just in gaming performance and would like to have faster upload speeds than my current 110/128 upload speeds.
    The nics run in different modes, bridged or separate for server routing or whatever.
    Does anyone know if this would work?
     
  10. addragyn

    addragyn Golden Member

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    nourdmrolNMT1, if you just need a little more bandwidth maybe you can get a faster line?

    I think they're junk. I bought two(200r) to test and they both ended up on eBay. Damn things couldn't even hold a connection. Maybe there has been a FW update. Nope. I did some research on Nexland and they didn't seem like a company I would place any sort of trust in. *This is just my experience.* Just to nitpick but it's not really doing load balancing. I wanted to like these things - they're so damn cheap.

    Unless you want to throwm down for a Cisco 2600 series for the house I'd say go with a Linux box. To buy HW that does this is still pricey for home use.
     
  11. sep

    sep Platinum Member

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    Garion is correct.

    Her209 - ISDN is 2 56k lines binded together and does get supported at the ISP.

    Dasterdly - Will not work for any internet game I know of. These work on a single routable IP address.

    -JC
     
  12. alrox

    alrox Member

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    OpenBSD 3.3 with pf has basic load balancing techniques available, as well as a lot of other good stuff. You'll only see a speed improvement in http transfers mostly, but that's all most people seem to care about anyway.
     
  13. chilehead

    chilehead Junior Member

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    Regarding DSL, the max speed that you are given is mostly decided by the quality and length of the phone line you have. If you have a regular connection they will give you 768, and if they have trouble making that work because of line condition or radio frequency interference or bridge taps, they will drop the speed to 384. If they cannot keep a connection working at that speed they will just deny you service - the FCC will not let them offer you DSL service slower than that because of the way it was initially offered, even if you say it's ok and you'll make due with 380. Some providers will even go up to 1536 if the connection will support it, but that is rare. DSL works only out to a distance of 14,000 ft from the local telephone company Central Office (CO), and the closer you get to the limit the more interference the lines will pick up... the phone lines act like antennas and pick up all kinds of RFI interference. If you live within a mile of a radio station broadcast tower you will not be getting DSL. Period.

    Some of the providers will offer DSL up to 6 meg speed, but the cost is usually out of the range of what most users are willing to put up with, and the other bottlenecks in the Internet usually cancel out the benefits. And again, it all depends on your distance from their central office.

    One other thing you can look into if you live in an area with SBC phone service is to inquire about "project Pronto". This is where they run fiber optic lines out to a 'neighborhood substation' called a CEV, and the copper runs from there to your house. The 14,000 foot limit is measured from the CEV instead of the CO, basically expanding the coverage for DSL. It costs them a bundle to put one in (million plus), but if there are enough customers in an area that want the service, they will do it.

    Based on what I learned working for one of the DSL companies, I would look into cable first... you can be installed within 24 hours, while DSL is about a 2 week miniumum - and I have seen delays as long as 6 months for some DSL customers.

    -Chilehead
     
  14. skyking

    skyking Lifer

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    Your best solution is to put every other computer( using a regular router) on the line that has the worst pings to your favorite gameserver, and put your gaming machine on the line with the best pings.
    That solution is free, and will get you the most performance possible.