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Question AMD Ryzen 5000 - AVAILABILITY

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AnitaPeterson

Diamond Member
Apr 24, 2001
5,731
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I was using a 3900x and the difference in performance, especially during gaming, is impressive.
Wow, I'm having a really hard time understanding how a 6-core 12-threads CPU can yield better gaming performance than a 12-cores 24-threads behemoth based on the same lithography. They're running at the same speed, too... Not saying you're wrong, it's just... puzzling. I'm not surprised at the gap between the 5600X and the 3700X, but to find that gap still there even at the top is hard to understand.
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
17,667
6,663
136
Wow, I'm having a really hard time understanding how a 6-core 12-threads CPU can yield better gaming performance than a 12-cores 24-threads behemoth based on the same lithography. They're running at the same speed, too... Not saying you're wrong, it's just... puzzling. I'm not surprised at the gap between the 5600X and the 3700X, but to find that gap still there even at the top is hard to understand.
Most games struggle to use more than 8 cores. And there's a pretty big increase in IPC and clocks between a stock 5600x and 3900x when running games. I've had to lock my 3900x to 4.3 GHz or higher when playing games since it routinely drops to 4.1 GHz or lower during normal gameplay.
 

Puffnstuff

Lifer
Mar 9, 2005
15,395
4,134
136
Wow, I'm having a really hard time understanding how a 6-core 12-threads CPU can yield better gaming performance than a 12-cores 24-threads behemoth based on the same lithography. They're running at the same speed, too... Not saying you're wrong, it's just... puzzling. I'm not surprised at the gap between the 5600X and the 3700X, but to find that gap still there even at the top is hard to understand.
5950X is 16 cores 32 threads so its really not that hard to understand and with the new chiplet design my infinity fabric speed has been raised combined with SAM to my RX 6900 XT black I now run 200 FPS in BF3 at 3440x1440 with freesync enabled. :hearteyes:
 

B-Riz

Golden Member
Feb 15, 2011
1,481
610
136
Honestly, at this point, why bother? If the move to AM5 happens this year, all these CPUs will shortly be platform-obsolete, the way AM3 is today...

*edit*
Downvoted? Really? 40 pages of people complaining about a retail shortage, we're past mid-2021, and a new socket is right around the corner... and now people get downvoted (anonymously!) for speaking their mind? When did this forum become Facebook or Twitter? Who the hell even asked for this feature?

You're really trying to get rid of us old-timers, or what? This exactly the kind of crap that makes us less interested in visiting this place.
AM5 is not happening in 2021; it is *rumored* to be launched in late fall / early winter 2022, BUT, a lot of us are going to wait a few years before jumping on DDR5, due to the historical record of DDR3 - DDR4, and all the other RAM changes of the past.

IF the new stuff at release is slower and more expensive than the old stuff, well, it will be underwhelming; though DDR5 is supposed to launch at high speeds, the price will be the deciding factor of whether a new system can be justified, even for enthusiasts to mess about with.

From a consumer standpoint, I feel like AMD dismissing AM4, even next year, is a bad move. There is a lot of life left in the socket still and B550 / X570 boards give a lot of bang for the buck.

My WAG is that the pandemic and the booming success of the Zen3 X parts (5900X demand is still not met) could justify pushing the DDR5 platform release a few months back with no negative effects to the long term roadmap or sales.
 

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
19,201
1,595
126
I am waiting for the threadripper 5000 series to come out in auguest.
I expect however it will be messy trying to get one, but not as messy as the 5900 / 5950.
I am curious on how they intend to do the numbering on them.
 

Mopetar

Diamond Member
Jan 31, 2011
6,119
2,939
136
From a consumer standpoint, I feel like AMD dismissing AM4, even next year, is a bad move. There is a lot of life left in the socket still and B550 / X570 boards give a lot of bang for the buck.
Sure there are arguments to keep it around and it isn't as though AMD really needs to transition to newer technologies like DDR5 or PCIe 5.0, but if Intel decides to jump on them as soon as they can (and there's some indication they may) then it may be in AMD's interest to follow just for the sake of marketing.

AM4 is has honestly had a much longer lifespan than most sockets get and it's hard to make the argument that it should stick around for the sake of offering an upgrade path when the earliest AM4 motherboards already don't support the latest Zen 3 CPUs. Anyone who gets in at the end of the cycle knows that they're going to be facing a limited upgrade path.

I'm not even sure anyone should be all that angry if Zen 3 did turn out to be the last CPU for AM4 because it's a big upgrade and in most regards the best you can buy right now. Sure there are rumors that Zen 4 could be just as big (or perhaps even bigger if you want to get on that hype train!) of an uplift, but for most people who already have a Zen 3 CPU I'm not sure if it would be worth upgrading. Anyone with a *300 chipset (and possibly even some with a *400 chipset) motherboard would probably need to upgrade anyways.

The other side of your argument is that with the success of Zen 3, AMD could just as easily hold back Zen 4 for a few extra months so that the DDR5 market is a bit more mature. Even if they're still going with AM4 they might want to hold off on the launch just to build up more inventory given that demand is going to be high.
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
17,667
6,663
136
AM4 can stick around as a budget system socket for a bit. AMD is still selling Zen2 chips at high prices and still selling Zen3 at a healthy clip. If v-cache CPUs actually show up that just extends the socket life a little while longer, permitting them to launch AM5 and keep AM4 alive in parallel.
 

A///

Golden Member
Feb 24, 2017
1,018
740
136
AM4 can stick around as a budget system socket for a bit. AMD is still selling Zen2 chips at high prices and still selling Zen3 at a healthy clip. If v-cache CPUs actually show up that just extends the socket life a little while longer, permitting them to launch AM5 and keep AM4 alive in parallel.
Mhmm, if AMD wasn't fudging their numbers and maybe understating their numbers, the v-cache processors should be phenomenal for years to come. Zen 4 and Zen 5, and whatever Intel can scrape together after their engineers are done licking the floor of the employee bathrooms would have to deliver enough performance increases per generation for people to consider upgrading. Frankly, if you're on Zen 2 right now I can't see a reason to upgrade unless you really need to get that prime gaming FPS rate.
 

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
19,201
1,595
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Chagall i heard is delayed.... sigh... there goes my upgrade.
 

A///

Golden Member
Feb 24, 2017
1,018
740
136
Chagall i heard is delayed.... sigh... there goes my upgrade.
I know which video you're referring to. I wouldn't place any confidence into anyone's so-called reports anytime soon. When you have otherwise decent channels getting basic facts wrong or not knowing product specs, you really want to stop putting so much faith in their words.
 

MalVeauX

Senior member
Dec 19, 2008
618
149
116
Anyone spot the 5300G in the wild yet? Any idea if a 4 core 5300x might exist? OEM only type thing maybe?

Very best,
 

MalVeauX

Senior member
Dec 19, 2008
618
149
116
The 5300G is OEM only.

I don't think that the 5300x has been released.
Booooo, thanks. Was thinking of a 3300x for cheap on one of my work machines as it needs good single thread performance (currently has a 3000G in it), but the 3300x are over-priced still, a 5600x is MSRP right now, so was looking at the options below 5600x that may be out there).

Very best,
 

Thunder 57

Golden Member
Aug 19, 2007
1,676
1,724
136
Booooo, thanks. Was thinking of a 3300x for cheap on one of my work machines as it needs good single thread performance (currently has a 3000G in it), but the 3300x are over-priced still, a 5600x is MSRP right now, so was looking at the options below 5600x that may be out there).

Very best,
The G APU's are due out August 5th I believe. The 5300G though is OEM only as Mauidib said. The 5600G might be a decent option for you if it stays at MSRP. Also the 5600X is on sale at Newegg for $270 though that ends today I think.
 

MalVeauX

Senior member
Dec 19, 2008
618
149
116
The G APU's are due out August 5th I believe. The 5300G though is OEM only as Mauidib said. The 5600G might be a decent option for you if it stays at MSRP. Also the 5600X is on sale at Newegg for $270 though that ends today I think.
Thanks; yea, I could just get a 5600x, but again, the application it will mostly use is single threaded mostly (very little use for multi-core in that particular workstation machine). So it's mainly about looking to get the best architecture CPU which is basically the Ryzen 5000 series at this moment (not counting Intel due to the AM4 board for obvious reasons, not rebuilding just to go Intel) with the fastest single core performance for cost ratio. Those 4 core Ryzens are great for this, if they were MSRP. I would have already gotten a 3300x for $100~125, but that's not where it is right now. It's stupid. And if it's closer to $200ish, it's like, well, just get the 5600x. So I started looking at the 5000 series mid-range, like the 5600G or lower, would love a 5300x to come to the market, even if just pulled from OEM systems and bought on Ebay, that's fine. Just would like to see it under $200 for this purpose. The 5600G may be just as costly as a 5600X or more depending on what the market does when its available, since the 3400G is retarded for cost right now (or I would have already gotten one of those too). I have zero use for the APU side, other than the pure convenience of not needing a display card (currently its a 3000G in the system again purely for single core and display output).

Very best,
 
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AnitaPeterson

Diamond Member
Apr 24, 2001
5,731
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The last few posts raise another good question... Was AM4 sufficiently taken advantage of? With so many CPUs not being available at all (not just the 5xxx series, but also the entire 4xxx group, plus all the various APUs) over the past year or so, moving to another incompatible socket would kill the goodwill and popular momentum AMD enjoyed since Zen 2.

Not to mention, it would also drag down the price for the 5xxx series CPUs, which would suddenly see themselves EOL-ed.
 

Ajay

Diamond Member
Jan 8, 2001
9,234
3,787
136
The last few posts raise another good question... Was AM4 sufficiently taken advantage of? With so many CPUs not being available at all (not just the 5xxx series, but also the entire 4xxx group, plus all the various APUs) over the past year or so, moving to another incompatible socket would kill the goodwill and popular momentum AMD enjoyed since Zen 2.

Not to mention, it would also drag down the price for the 5xxx series CPUs, which would suddenly see themselves EOL-ed.
Every socket eventually comes up short when it comes to adding new features (DRAM types, PCIe specs, etc.). So, they are inevitable in order for the technology to move forward. 4 years on the same socket is pretty dang good for a CPU, IMHO.
 

Thunder 57

Golden Member
Aug 19, 2007
1,676
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Every socket eventually comes up short when it comes to adding new features (DRAM types, PCIe specs, etc.). So, they are inevitable in order for the technology to move forward. 4 years on the same socket is pretty dang good for a CPU, IMHO.
Very good. The only one I can think of that comes close is AM2. I went from a single core A64, two dual cores, and finally a Phenom II X4 all on the same board. Sure got my money's worth out of that board.
 

DrMrLordX

Lifer
Apr 27, 2000
17,667
6,663
136
Not to mention, it would also drag down the price for the 5xxx series CPUs, which would suddenly see themselves EOL-ed.
Vermeer will be replaced by . . . Vermeer-X or whatever it is that AMD launches with v-cache to send AM4 out the door on a high note. Assuming AMD actually releases any v-cache CPUs at all. It's still just a rumour at this point, officially. Regardless, expect Vermeer to be EOLed irrespective of AM5. AMD could easily allow AM4 and AM5 to co-exist on the market, especially if Raphael on AM5 has a short list of SKUs available at launch.
 
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AnitaPeterson

Diamond Member
Apr 24, 2001
5,731
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Very good. The only one I can think of that comes close is AM2. I went from a single core A64, two dual cores, and finally a Phenom II X4 all on the same board. Sure got my money's worth out of that board.
Socket 775 on the Intel side wasn't bad, either. It went from Pentium D and DDR2 all the way to the Q9600 and DDR3...
Wikipedia says it had an unusually long life span, lasting 7 years...

Hopefully, AMD won't retire the goose that lays golden eggs.
 

Thunder 57

Golden Member
Aug 19, 2007
1,676
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Socket 775 on the Intel side wasn't bad, either. It went from Pentium D and DDR2 all the way to the Q9600 and DDR3...
Wikipedia says it had an unusually long life span, lasting 7 years...

Hopefully, AMD won't retire the goose that lays golden eggs.
Nice try, but because of chipset reasons it never allowed the same flexibility as AM2(+) / AM4. Intel has largely changed compatibility after two generations. Show me when Intel has done the same. Even with LGA 775, you can't just say well they changed the memory standard so lets call it it a day.
 

Sick Willie

Member
Apr 8, 2010
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Nice try, but because of chipset reasons it never allowed the same flexibility as AM2(+) / AM4. Intel has largely changed compatibility after two generations. Show me when Intel has done the same. Even with LGA 775, you can't just say well they changed the memory standard so lets call it it a day.
For sure. There was no guarantees that just because you had a s775 board and processor that they would work together unless you bought them both new at roughly the same time. Socket 775 was always a crap shoot.
 

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