AMD RYZEN 2000 Builders Thread

B-Riz

Senior member
Feb 15, 2011
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#1
Trying out the 2700X, a Gigabyte or AsRock x470 board, 32GB 2x16 3200 kit, maybe a Vega card if I can find a deal.
 

B-Riz

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Feb 15, 2011
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#3

ElFenix

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Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
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#4
Changed title on this one to be a bit more accurate/less confusing and locked the other one for repost.

AT Moderator ElFenix
 

Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 16, 2002
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#5
The memory already shipped. The CPU is due to ship on 4/19, and the motherboard on 4/26. I hate waiting a week, but I wanted to let the chip have its full potential on the new series motherboard and the fastest memory that motherboard/CPU can handle. Its rated 3600 cas15 and I am going to try 3466 cas 14. 3466 is the best the motherboard is advertised to handle in the specs.
 

B-Riz

Senior member
Feb 15, 2011
870
0
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#6
The memory already shipped. The CPU is due to ship on 4/19, and the motherboard on 4/26. I hate waiting a week, but I wanted to let the chip have its full potential on the new series motherboard and the fastest memory that motherboard/CPU can handle. Its rated 3600 cas15 and I am going to try 3466 cas 14. 3466 is the best the motherboard is advertised to handle in the specs.
Very nice! I will be at the mercy of what Micro Center has for boards, hopefully no shortage like last year. I did order some RAM from Newegg, hoping it is here by the 19th and I can tweak it. Am trying some 3200 2x16GB sticks, not sure if Hynix or Samsung chips, but the price was right.
 
Apr 14, 2015
55
0
51
#7
2600x, Asus ROG Strix X470-I (mini itx), and 2x8 3200 C14.
 

inf64

Platinum Member
Mar 11, 2011
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crazyworldofchips.blogspot.com
#8
I will also join the club :). I'm planning to get 2700X, some compatible Gskill 16GB kit that can do at least 3200Mhz and MSI 470 board. ETA sometime in May. It should be fun, cannot wait :D
 
Apr 14, 2015
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0
51
#9
Edited, possibly not relevant to thread, moving to General
 
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Feb 14, 2017
84
0
51
#10
I pre-ordered the 2700X -- and intend to use it with my existing MB and the other parts in my sig -- except for the H7 cpu cooler which will be swapped out for the Wraith Prism.

I'll probably do a mild pstate OC after testing a stock setup.

If I can't get a proper showing out of the existing Asrock AB350M Pro4 MB, I'll wait for MB reviews to make a final decision, but I'm likely to choose a non-ultimate Taichi.
 
Dec 12, 2001
26,360
4
106
#11
I want to but I want to do a whole new build including GPU but they are just unreasonably priced. I don't want to pair a 2700x with 970s. Kind of sucks for me lol
 

Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 16, 2002
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#12
So I just ordered a big heatsink. The CM Hyper 612 v2. It cools most of my E5-2683v3's (14 cores). So first I will test stock, then OC'ed on the stock HSF, then OC'ed on the 612. I had to spend $10 just to have the adapter shipped from CM, it used to be 7. They need to include it in the cooler !
 

whm1974

Diamond Member
Jul 24, 2016
6,053
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#13
By the time I build another rig, I might end up with the 3000 or 4000 series Ryzen.
 
Dec 12, 2001
26,360
4
106
#14
By the time I build another rig, I might end up with the 3000 or 4000 series Ryzen.
I may end up in the same camp if for no other reason than I don't think it's worth the upgrade if I don't also include a new GPU. A 1080ti alone is more than a Mobo/Memory/CPU combo/PSU lol
 
Feb 19, 2017
61
1
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#15
I will be swapping my 1700 to 2700X in few weeks time. It will go to into Asus X370 Prime, so I hope for good BIOS support.
 
Jan 11, 2018
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#16
So can anyone list all of the advantages, of the 2000 series over the first gen chips?
 

rainy

Senior member
Jul 17, 2013
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#17
So can anyone list all of the advantages, of the 2000 series over the first gen chips?
Higher CPU clocks, lower latencies of cache and memory controller, improved turbo, better compatibility of RAM and also support of faster/higher clocked RAM.
 
Last edited:

guskline

Diamond Member
Apr 17, 2006
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#19
Pre-ordered the 2700x to replace my 1800x below.
 

B-Riz

Senior member
Feb 15, 2011
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#20
So I just ordered a big heatsink. The CM Hyper 612 v2. It cools most of my E5-2683v3's (14 cores). So first I will test stock, then OC'ed on the stock HSF, then OC'ed on the 612. I had to spend $10 just to have the adapter shipped from CM, it used to be 7. They need to include it in the cooler !
That is kinda lame. I paid $5 for a CM bracket for the 212 plus at Micro Center last year when I picked up the 1700, just in case the included cooler was meh. Later on it became free with a purchase of a Ryzen cpu, lol.

CM does have good customer service, could try sending a nice e-mail, maybe get a refund or some l00t.
 
Feb 2, 2017
290
0
96
#21
Going 2700X (sweet, sweet Prism RGB) and pre-ordered the ASrock ITX X470 board coming May 1 (unfortunately).

Cramming it with more RGB fans into my existing H200i build temporarily running a R5 2400G that'll migrate to HTPC when I get my other stuff in.

That one is going into a InWin Chopin case that is all the rage these days with the kids.
 
Oct 10, 1999
64,855
98
126
#22
Debating a 2600 or getting a 1700 on huge discount, but probably will go 2600. Put off an upgrade for a year due to RAM prices, but have given up on waiting. One highlight for me will be getting a new Power Supply. My 500watt Seasonic is over 10 years old and still works great, but I figure it's time to semi retire it before it blinks out of existence.
 

EXCellR8

Platinum Member
Sep 1, 2010
2,705
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#23
I will be swapping my 1700 to 2700X in few weeks time. It will go to into Asus X370 Prime, so I hope for good BIOS support.
2700X calling my name too due to the easy peasy swap upgrade nature, but I'm stubborn and wont do it, at least not right now.

stupid flare x memory still obscenely priced I see. heresy... maybe by the time Threadripper 2 launches I'll be able to grab more DDR4 for cheaper. (yea okay)
 
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eek2121

Senior member
Aug 2, 2005
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#24
I might build a 2700x as well as an 8700k system just so I can review them. I'm finding that reviewers are doing very poor jobs these days. I have a laundry list of things I'd like to see reviewers do, one of the least is disclosing any scripts they used, GPU control panel settings, etc. Anandtech (they are an excellent site, not bashing them at all btw, but every site has it's own fault) for example has a rocket league script that they have not disclosed. They claim Threadripper only gets a 99th percentile of 163.12 fps (Note they also originally only used a 1060, but now the bench says 1080...they should be using a 1080ti to eliminate bottlenecks). I've played several games (hundreds of hours) of rocket league, it's up there with one of my favorite games, and I do not even come close to going this low. Different GPUs, memory, speeds, SSDs, etc. all influence framerate. NUMA vs UMA, and much more. Testing should be transparent. A good benchmark is user reproducible. While this can make it hard to come up with good benchmarks, it's not impossible. I've set my eyes on a hardware site for a while, and I have a budget to buy the products, I just would rather spend that money on other, more fun things, but perhaps it's time to jump into the game. Many reviewers think that having custom 'private' workloads give them an edge, but all it does is create the illusion of bias. Companies like Nvidia also can't optimize their drivers for the shear number of games that exist today, so being more extensive by testing more games can make it impossible for manufacturers to 'rig' tests.

Absolute IPC (normalized MHz/GHz) is important as well as chip performance at stock speeds (within the manufacturers recommended specs) as well as overclocking potential. All this stuff can be automated, with an 8 hour work day I could put out all kinds of reviews.

I think purch has to do with a lot of this, I suspect these folks aren't getting the dollars they need for proper reviews. I'm going to set up a budget for this pretty soon and will likely order a 2700x after I recover from my surgery on May 7th. After that, we'll see. I've already degraded my threadripper, but I still may do limited testing with it to compare. I also have a 2600k in my posession. The domain name has been registered and, being a developer and technology guru, it won't take me long to set up a site. If this interests you, Stay tuned. You'll see my post on reddit and elsewhere when I'm ready to go.
 

Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 16, 2002
16,947
359
136
#25
I might build a 2700x as well as an 8700k system just so I can review them. I'm finding that reviewers are doing very poor jobs these days. I have a laundry list of things I'd like to see reviewers do, one of the least is disclosing any scripts they used, GPU control panel settings, etc. Anandtech (they are an excellent site, not bashing them at all btw, but every site has it's own fault) for example has a rocket league script that they have not disclosed. They claim Threadripper only gets a 99th percentile of 163.12 fps (Note they also originally only used a 1060, but now the bench says 1080...they should be using a 1080ti to eliminate bottlenecks). I've played several games (hundreds of hours) of rocket league, it's up there with one of my favorite games, and I do not even come close to going this low. Different GPUs, memory, speeds, SSDs, etc. all influence framerate. NUMA vs UMA, and much more. Testing should be transparent. A good benchmark is user reproducible. While this can make it hard to come up with good benchmarks, it's not impossible. I've set my eyes on a hardware site for a while, and I have a budget to buy the products, I just would rather spend that money on other, more fun things, but perhaps it's time to jump into the game. Many reviewers think that having custom 'private' workloads give them an edge, but all it does is create the illusion of bias. Companies like Nvidia also can't optimize their drivers for the shear number of games that exist today, so being more extensive by testing more games can make it impossible for manufacturers to 'rig' tests.

Absolute IPC (normalized MHz/GHz) is important as well as chip performance at stock speeds (within the manufacturers recommended specs) as well as overclocking potential. All this stuff can be automated, with an 8 hour work day I could put out all kinds of reviews.

I think purch has to do with a lot of this, I suspect these folks aren't getting the dollars they need for proper reviews. I'm going to set up a budget for this pretty soon and will likely order a 2700x after I recover from my surgery on May 7th. After that, we'll see. I've already degraded my threadripper, but I still may do limited testing with it to compare. I also have a 2600k in my posession. The domain name has been registered and, being a developer and technology guru, it won't take me long to set up a site. If this interests you, Stay tuned. You'll see my post on reddit and elsewhere when I'm ready to go.
Just put the results here, you can even do pics.
 

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