AMD is worth more than Intel now

BFG10K

Lifer
Aug 14, 2000
22,029
1,144
126
Yeah, I know market cap isn't an end-all, but it's still pretty impressive considering they were staring down the barrel of bankruptcy just a decade ago.

 

moinmoin

Diamond Member
Jun 1, 2017
3,608
5,105
136
Due to the merger being all stocks the market cap increased by a third from one day to another. If that's not embraced by the stock market the share price should fall accordingly, the fact that it's rising atm tell me the valuation is widely being seen as fair.

Annual revenue increased by 3 billion (Xilinx's share) as well with the merger.
 

IntelUser2000

Elite Member
Oct 14, 2003
8,276
3,188
136
Among my missed investments, it started with buying Intel at $21 and selling at $17. With dividends it would have been a consistent and steady growth.

Also I was looking at Netflix when it was $10 and Tesla when they were around that point as well. Tesla was definitely something I could have put in as it had a good basis.

AMD at $4.

It's really, really difficult to buy a share when a company is low as where AMD was though. The news back then was negative every single day, so sticking through all that requires herculean mindset.
 

lightmanek

Senior member
Feb 19, 2017
341
622
136
I bought AMD shares at $2 virtually on my test account ... boy, $10000 investment could have been quite profitable I think o_O
 

moinmoin

Diamond Member
Jun 1, 2017
3,608
5,105
136
It's really, really difficult to buy a share when a company is low as where AMD was though. The news back then was negative every single day, so sticking through all that requires herculean mindset.
Personally I disagree, AMD was never going away for their involvement in consoles with x86 alone. Too bad for me I didn't do stocks back then.
 

ElFenix

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Mar 20, 2000
101,979
6,904
126
I know - back when it was cheap, I kept thinking about what my Grandpa always told me - invest in companies who make products that you use. However, I was worried that they might go under back then.
really should have bought aapl instead of ipods. i didn't even use the ipods all that much. at least i used the geforces and radeons every day. and the geforces and radeons made me a nice chunk of change.
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
15,860
6,925
146
Who would have guessed back during their "hot dumpster fire" days they'd turn it around and be in the position they are in today? Not this guy for sure. Poor performing parts, drowning with their GlobalFoundries contract.

After Intel released their Sandy Bridge CPU lineup back in 2011, I really thought I'd likely never have an AMD build ever again. And on top of that, Nvidia was way ahead of them as well, and they really didn't have anything outside of budget GPUs that were really worth considering.

I'm honestly surprised they didn't go bankrupt / get bought out. I figured buying their stock would be like taking my money and burning it. Oops........
 

moinmoin

Diamond Member
Jun 1, 2017
3,608
5,105
136
I'm honestly surprised they didn't go bankrupt / get bought out.
Bankruptcy wasn't a real danger imo considering both Sony and Microsoft relied on AMD for console chips, Intel relied on AMD for "serious competition" (and was laughing to the bank until rather recently), and DARPA relied on AMD for the exascale supercomputer projects that turned out to be just on time (unlike Intel's).

But day to day business at the time looked really bleak. Most leadership with short term thinking kill companies in such a state. So in hindsight it's nice to see how much AMD actually knew what to do long term from 2012 onward.

Buying out without losing the x86 license isn't possible, that indeed would have killed AMD fast.
 

Doug S

Golden Member
Feb 8, 2020
1,267
1,864
106
Who would have guessed back during their "hot dumpster fire" days they'd turn it around and be in the position they are in today? Not this guy for sure. Poor performing parts, drowning with their GlobalFoundries contract.

After Intel released their Sandy Bridge CPU lineup back in 2011, I really thought I'd likely never have an AMD build ever again. And on top of that, Nvidia was way ahead of them as well, and they really didn't have anything outside of budget GPUs that were really worth considering.

I'm honestly surprised they didn't go bankrupt / get bought out. I figured buying their stock would be like taking my money and burning it. Oops........

They were helped this time around by Intel's process missteps, and the cryptocurrency cult creating a massive shortage of high end GPUs. Not saying they don't deserve their current success but those market forces really helped push AMD products better than they otherwise would have been.

If Intel or Nvidia could have got a buyout past the regulators, I'm sure they would have.
 

GodisanAtheist

Diamond Member
Nov 16, 2006
4,149
2,801
136
I sold my AMD shares low way back in the day and a lot of my investments to put together as large of a down payment as possible for my house. My house has since doubled in value and is worth a truly enormous sum of money by my standards (Bay Area).

From that perspective, its a bit of a salve for me (I have a nice spacious place to live and a big chunk of change in equity) but it does make me wonder what tech company am I not looking at today that is set for a stratospheric rise in valuation.
 
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DisEnchantment

Golden Member
Mar 3, 2017
1,241
3,734
136
I bought a ton of AMD at 11.2 USD, and sold at 26 USD. I live through severe regrets now.
At least I made some money, but my friend whom I influenced to buy AMD at 9.00 USD did not sell and he treats me like a savior (he had a rough marriage and lost his savings during separation, but his investments in AMD are very substantial)
I have been researching heavily in some semi stocks, hopefully I make up my mind soon.

Right now I wish all of Intel, AMD, NV, and other folks do well. I had not so nice relationship working with NV professionally (as a customer), but it is OK, nothing personal.
I have close friends that work in these companies, former colleagues, university mates, and they are few of many pillars of tech standing in the western world.
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
15,860
6,925
146
They were helped this time around by Intel's process missteps, and the cryptocurrency cult creating a massive shortage of high end GPUs. Not saying they don't deserve their current success but those market forces really helped push AMD products better than they otherwise would have been.
Absolutely.

For AMD to be anywhere near where they are right now, they had to have no missteps. They could not afford another mistake like Bulldozer (although that huge failure and lessons learned is what ultimately led to the creation of Ryzen).

And even with AMD executing their plan/roadmap dang near flawlessly since Ryzen's release, they couldn't have released it during a more perfect period (Intel's disorganization / CEO and management leadership failure to execute during that period with them being stuck on 14nm seemingly FOREVER).
 

Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 16, 2002
23,115
11,874
136
The BS coming out of Intels mouth now is insane. There is no way its true or even close. I don't see any real changes in the mix for at least 2 years.

AMD is still on track and delivering, where Intel is still faltering. Alder lake was a start, but between the high wattage, and the problems with big.little and the OS, they are still behind the ball.
 

JasonLD

Senior member
Aug 22, 2017
476
431
136
The BS coming out of Intels mouth now is insane. There is no way its true or even close. I don't see any real changes in the mix for at least 2 years.
"5 nodes in 4 years" might sound BS but that is basically 2 major node updates in 4 years considering Intel 7, 3, and 18A are all half steps previous referred as pluses.
 

moinmoin

Diamond Member
Jun 1, 2017
3,608
5,105
136
They were helped this time around by Intel's process missteps, and the cryptocurrency cult creating a massive shortage of high end GPUs. Not saying they don't deserve their current success but those market forces really helped push AMD products better than they otherwise would have been.
I think you're underselling AMD's achievement in this. Yes, Intel's increasingly lackluster execution over the past decade helped AMD look better than it actually was (its execution is not as stringent as it likes to make it seem, with fillers like Zen+ etc.) but nobody seriously expected AMD to come back to being competitive again the way it did. For context: Zen was pretty much announced at AMD's absolute low point in public and market perception.
 

Saylick

Golden Member
Sep 10, 2012
1,780
2,497
136
I bought a ton of AMD at 11.2 USD, and sold at 26 USD. I live through severe regrets now.
I'm kind of in the same boat. Had over 900 shares at around $10 USD, but got cute along the way and did not make as much as I could have if I just held the whole way. I still own a large number of shares (not AT OT Millionaire's Club) but at a substantially higher cost basis than $10. I like AMD's roadmap, have a ton of faith in Lisa Su and the team's execution, learned my lesson, so I'm just holding through the ups and downs. I likely won't sell until 2024 or later, assuming AMD keeps executing and Intel stays behind.
 

Roland00Address

Platinum Member
Dec 17, 2008
2,132
225
106
The BS coming out of Intels mouth now is insane. There is no way its true or even close. I don't see any real changes in the mix for at least 2 years.
Intel does have a working Intel 18A wafer, it is just not what we care about for it is SRAM and not fancy SoCs / Desktop / Workstation / Server CPUs. What I am trying to signify is that Intel is in the liminal space where their claims could be sane or could be insane, we do not know and will not know until the 2nd half of 2024 (and actual chips in computers way past that.)

What I am trying to signify is I take any intel roadmap claims with a grain of salt for they been wrong since 2014, that is 8 years of grief. Yet it may be possible and saying the "insane" word I feel is not helpful.
 
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Doug S

Golden Member
Feb 8, 2020
1,267
1,864
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I think you're underselling AMD's achievement in this. Yes, Intel's increasingly lackluster execution over the past decade helped AMD look better than it actually was (its execution is not as stringent as it likes to make it seem, with fillers like Zen+ etc.) but nobody seriously expected AMD to come back to being competitive again the way it did. For context: Zen was pretty much announced at AMD's absolute low point in public and market perception.
Why? This is no different than the Athlon/Opteron days where AMD had clearly better offerings than what Intel did. There were several important differences from that time and this time:

1) Intel was executing perfectly process-wise back then, which made up some of the gap between Athlon/Opteron and Intel's ill fated bet on P4
2) there wasn't a pandemic induced boom in PC spending that allowed everyone to sell all they could make
3) Intel had been marketing so heavily on megahertz/gigahertz for years that a lot of people were fooled into thinking P4 CPUs were better than they were because of their high clock rates
4) most enterprise customers had NEVER purchased a single AMD product, so it took a lot longer for them to be comfortable with AMD products than it was this time around (since if nothing else most of them had some experienced with AMD's GPUs)
5) Intel was still using anticompetitive tactics like their exclusive deal with Dell that gave them a discount in exchange for selling PCs with Intel CPUs only, they can't do that today

Yes, Zen was a low but they had experienced previous lows before Athlon/Opteron (helped by Intel's dumb bet on P4) brought them to a new high.
 

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