Alien Earth 13 light years away

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JTsyo

Lifer
Nov 18, 2007
11,677
850
126
No need to go faster than light.

13 light years away would only take a ship a little over 5 years travel time with 1g constant acceleration half the way there and 1g deceleration for the latter half.

Although on earth it would appear to take almost 14 years to get there due to relativity.

You would think we wouldn't be too far from being able to launch a unmanned probe capable of such a trip.

If you travel for 5 years at 1g, you would be 5 time the speed of light.
 

meob

Member
Dec 19, 2011
43
0
0
No need to go faster than light.

13 light years away would only take a ship a little over 5 years travel time with 1g constant acceleration half the way there and 1g deceleration for the latter half.

Although on earth it would appear to take almost 14 years to get there due to relativity.

You would think we wouldn't be too far from being able to launch a unmanned probe capable of such a trip.

no, we aren't remotely close to sending an unmanned probe anywhere near the speed of light.
 

Agent11

Diamond Member
Jan 22, 2006
3,535
1
0
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randomrogue

Diamond Member
Jan 15, 2011
5,462
0
0
The space shuttle not an option any longer (17,500 mph @ 498,000 years) but we could send a Soyuz capsule lol,
 

Red Squirrel

No Lifer
May 24, 2003
66,976
11,931
126
www.anyf.ca
Maybe we're actually seeing our own planet, but the transformation of the area around it and physical movement happened faster than light so we are seeing a "lagged" version of it. :biggrin:
 

meob

Member
Dec 19, 2011
43
0
0
Compared to manned exploration using constant acceleration a probe would be easy. Half of the problem is building everything on earth and wasting so much effort getting it into space. We need a colony in the moon already.



http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/Relativity/SR/rocket.html

You are confusing the experienced time of the rocket and the observed time of people on earth.

how would we accelerate a probe any more than a manned vehicle to even a fraction of the speed of light?
 

silverpig

Lifer
Jul 29, 2001
27,709
11
81
No need to go faster than light.

13 light years away would only take a ship a little over 5 years travel time with 1g constant acceleration half the way there and 1g deceleration for the latter half.

Although on earth it would appear to take almost 14 years to get there due to relativity.

You would think we wouldn't be too far from being able to launch a unmanned probe capable of such a trip.

The fuel required for 1g acceleration for 5 years is enormous.
 

silverpig

Lifer
Jul 29, 2001
27,709
11
81
Compared to manned exploration using constant acceleration a probe would be easy. Half of the problem is building everything on earth and wasting so much effort getting it into space. We need a colony in the moon already.



http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/Relativity/SR/rocket.html

You are confusing the experienced time of the rocket and the observed time of people on earth.

At the end of the day he's not entirely wrong though. After all, he did make a 13ly trip in ~5 years.
 

John Connor

Lifer
Nov 30, 2012
22,840
617
121
If the planet did have intelligent life SETI sure as hell would have heard a broadcast from the planet by now.
 

Agent11

Diamond Member
Jan 22, 2006
3,535
1
0
how would we accelerate a probe any more than a manned vehicle to even a fraction of the speed of light?

All you need is a light enough probe, and an efficient enough means of propulsion.

Would need some sort of powerful magnetic shielding though, I wonder if you could design the shield to funnel charged particles to feed the engines? That would be a neat trick.
 

gevorg

Diamond Member
Nov 3, 2004
5,075
1
0
13 light years away? we can't even get to Mars which is just 0.00000076051 light years away from us!! (as in establish a base and have permanent human presence there)
 

Agent11

Diamond Member
Jan 22, 2006
3,535
1
0
Thats just a lack of will though, we could easily be doing so already if we wanted to.
 

phucheneh

Diamond Member
Jun 30, 2012
7,306
5
0
This news is notsomuch news. We've suspected the existence of nearby habitable worlds for a while. It's just a probability thing.

The search has been on via the method they describe in the article, which it admits is a method that will only detect planets that are in the proper orbit.

...but they're still looking. Basically, it sounds like someone said 'well, we've been looking, and we've now deemed it more probable to be probable.'

Hooray? :hmm:
 

Fritzo

Lifer
Jan 3, 2001
41,873
2,114
126
no, we aren't remotely close to sending an unmanned probe anywhere near the speed of light.

The fastest man-made object so far was the Helios spacecraft from the 70's, which they discovered was orbiting at like 150,000mph (I remember this because the designers had no idea it would end up going that fast :D )

I think the fastest propelled object is the New Horizons spacecraft heading to Pluto right now, which is travelling in the 60000mph range.

We have designs for nuclear rockets and solar sails that could theoretically reach .06c to .10c, but the materials and technology to construct them aren't available yet. Craft travelling this fast would probably have to be unmanned, as anything colliding with it would shoot through the craft like a shotgun blast.