Question Alder Lake - Official Thread

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psolord

Golden Member
Sep 16, 2009
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@psolord

I would think it's more of a personal preference. However, W11 would save you the hassle later of upgrading. You might even see better performance out of your 3060 with W11 vs W10. I'm running a laptop with 12700H / 3060 / W11 and it's running smooth other than some self induced issues / gremlins I'm dealing with. There are some reg hacks you can do to make W11 more appealing like functions that W10 has natively.

If you are up for it then maybe install both on separate partitions and compare the performance and then you can go back and delete whichever doesn't work well to reclaim the space using a livecd / gparted.
You know what? You are right. I already have an SSD that will be cloned onto the new nvme, so I will upgrade the nvme to 11 and do some benchmarks and I will see how it goes. Thanks.
 
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igor_kavinski

Diamond Member
Jul 27, 2020
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Wow. Only two P-cores. Even with a discrete low end GPU, these U laptops won't be great for gaming, unlike the AMD 6000U-series. At least 3 P-cores would have catered to the minimum 6 thread decent performance requirement for 3D game engines.
 

gdansk

Golden Member
Feb 8, 2011
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Of course it isn't good at gaming it's for thin and light devices. It only has 4 PCIe lanes to spare for a GPU. They shouldn't ever be equipped with discrete graphics. That's for the "28W" P or maybe the "15W" U series with a really low end GPU.

I don't think it is a bad configuration in theory but it's "9W" with a 29W PL2. Rembrandt with cTDP of 15W would probably be better performance, easier thermal design and better battery life. But it's Dell.
 
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jpiniero

Lifer
Oct 1, 2010
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Wow. Only two P-cores. Even with a discrete low end GPU, these U laptops won't be great for gaming, unlike the AMD 6000U-series. At least 3 P-cores would have catered to the minimum 6 thread decent performance requirement for 3D game engines.
As far as I can tell at Dell, all of their Alder U laptops come with IGP only. Even P only had two mx* models and that's it. If you want discrete you have to buy H pretty much.
 

igor_kavinski

Diamond Member
Jul 27, 2020
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I'm just saying that Intel's screwed. Those E-cores won't do any favors for gaming but a Ryzen 6000U laptop won't be hampered like that. First servers and now thin and light laptops. Intel's screwed. Well, at least on paper. AMD doesn't have enough supply so Intel still cashes in on the demand with an inferior product.
 

jpiniero

Lifer
Oct 1, 2010
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I'm just saying that Intel's screwed. Those E-cores won't do any favors for gaming but a Ryzen 6000U laptop won't be hampered like that. First servers and now thin and light laptops. Intel's screwed. Well, at least on paper. AMD doesn't have enough supply so Intel still cashes in on the demand with an inferior product.
Seems most of the Ryzen laptops with discrete are also H too.
 

hemedans

Member
Jan 31, 2015
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Wow. Only two P-cores. Even with a discrete low end GPU, these U laptops won't be great for gaming, unlike the AMD 6000U-series. At least 3 P-cores would have catered to the minimum 6 thread decent performance requirement for 3D game engines.
I know you guys only look at high end, but low end Alderlake Killed it.

Those low power cpu like pentium 8505 or i3 1215u made whole used market obsolete.

Like Pentium 8505 can match i7 10610u

i3 1215U is more powerfull than top of the line Tigerlake i7 1195G7
 
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lobz

Platinum Member
Feb 10, 2017
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I know you guys only look at high end, but low end Alderlake Killed it.

Those low power cpu like pentium 8505 or i3 1215u made whole used market obsolete.

Like Pentium 8505 can match i7 10610u

i3 1215U is more powerfull than top of the line Tigerlake i7 1195G7
I'm not sure how many people in the second hand market were out to buy a 10610u specifically, but... yes, you're right there! ADL low-end is just freaking dandy. Kinda sad, that in the end, this phenomenon only hurts Intel's bottom line in a sense and doesn't even scratch AMD's bottom line at all, because we're probably not gonna see really aggressively competitive AMD products on the lower end for the foreseeable future 😑😑😑
 
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dullard

Elite Member
May 21, 2001
24,036
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Since there aren't many Alder Lake T benchmarks, I ran a few on the 12600T. Do note though that most applications of the T chips are probably highly system dependent. Many go into tiny desktop computers which have either a miniscule fan or sometimes no fan at all. These benchmarks are run on:
  • An HP Elite Mini 600 G9
  • 12600T CPU (6 P cores, no E cores)
  • 16 GB (2x8 GB) DDR5-4800
  • iGPU (Intel UHD Graphics 770)
  • Windows 11 Home (updated everything as of June 23, 2022)
  • Stock everything, other than I uninstalled most junk software but added in Avira
  • HP standard power management.
  • Nothing here is expected to be a record breaking
Geekbench 5.4.5: 1798 Single Core, 8021 Multi Core https://browser.geekbench.com/v5/cpu/15660360
Geekbench 5.4.5 OpenCL: Compute 8619 https://browser.geekbench.com/v5/compute/5032865
Passmark 10.2.1006: Passmark Rating 3570, CPU 16525, 2D Graphics 387: 3D Graphics 1843, Memory 2909, Disk 24143
UserBenchmark: Gaming 20%, Desktop 99%, Workstation 19% https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/53477266
RapydMark 32 bit (note the 64-bit version in RapydMark doesn't come with all needed DLL files and I haven't yet downloaded them) High: 633.808 seconds.
 
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Roland00Address

Platinum Member
Dec 17, 2008
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Since there aren't many Alder Lake T benchmarks, I ran a few on the 12600T. Do note though that most applications of the T chips are probably highly system dependent. Many go into tiny desktop computers which have either a miniscule fan or sometimes no fan at all. These benchmarks are run on:
  • An HP Elite Mini 600 G9
  • 12600T CPU (6 P cores, no E cores)
  • 16 GB (2x8 GB) DDR5-4800
  • iGPU (Intel UHD Graphics 770)
  • Windows 11 Home (updated everything as of June 23, 2022)
  • Stock everything, other than I uninstalled most junk software but added in Avira
  • HP standard power management.
  • Nothing here is expected to be a record breaking
Geekbench 5.4.5: 1798 Single Core, 8021 Multi Core https://browser.geekbench.com/v5/cpu/15660360
Geekbench 5.4.5 OpenCL: Compute 8619 https://browser.geekbench.com/v5/compute/5032865
Passmark 10.2.1006: Passmark Rating 3570, CPU 16525, 2D Graphics 387: 3D Graphics 1843, Memory 2909, Disk 24143
UserBenchmark: Gaming 20%, Desktop 99%, Workstation 19% https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/53477266
RapydMark 32 bit (note the 64-bit version in RapydMark doesn't come with all needed DLL files and I haven't yet downloaded them) High: 633.808 seconds.
Apples and Oranges but that is like 8 to 10 times faster than the quad core atoms from 10 years ago? I am thinking the z3770 but most devices sold were the slower z3740. Look how far we come!
 

dullard

Elite Member
May 21, 2001
24,036
2,252
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1798 ST is freakin' good for a T series CPU. Try turning off HT if you can. You should be able to boost the ST score above 1800 with slight decrease in MT score. With an i5-12400, I got 1735 without HT but in the 1600s with HT.
Probably would get into the low 1800s. The 12600T should turbo 4.5% more than your 12400. So, 1735*1.045 = 1813 give or take a few points. I'll have to look into turning off HT for a test. As a side note: getting into the BIOS is a pain for me as my main keyboard for it doesn't have function keys (Lenovo N5902).
 

dullard

Elite Member
May 21, 2001
24,036
2,252
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Apples and Oranges but that is like 8 to 10 times faster than the quad core atoms from 10 years ago? I am thinking the z3770 but most devices sold were the slower z3740. Look how far we come!
I still want to do more to benchmark the old computer that it replaced (9 years old). It was an i3-2365M. And do note that the older mobile chip was only 17 W. But, this 12600T is roughly 7x to 14x faster on the benchmarks that I have run so far. The old computer (Lenovo Q190) had a fan failure, which mostly killed its hard drive and its GPU when it overheated. It ran, but it was limping along. But even when it did run before the fan failure, it couldn't do a slideshow of a random set of 50,000+ family photos while playing Pandora. Or it took hours to create an MKV file from a DVD/blu-ray. It also had some noticeable lag when upscaling/downscaling a few movies. So, I think this new computer is overkill but should solve all those problems, especially when I go to a 4K TV.

This is the entertainment hub for my family. It just barely fits into the slot under the TV.
1656302482381.png
 
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coercitiv

Diamond Member
Jan 24, 2014
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As a side note: getting into the BIOS is a pain for me as my main keyboard for it doesn't have function keys (Lenovo N5902).
Use Windows to go to UEFI: Settings > Update & Security > Recovery > Advanced startup. You can get there in a few seconds by pressing Win button and typing first letters of "uefi", since it will show a search result with "Advanced startup" on top.

You'll have to maneuver through a few options when the system restarts, but after the first time it gets a lot faster.
 

dullard

Elite Member
May 21, 2001
24,036
2,252
126
Use Windows to go to UEFI: Settings > Update & Security > Recovery > Advanced startup. You can get there in a few seconds by pressing Win button and typing first letters of "uefi", since it will show a search result with "Advanced startup" on top.

You'll have to maneuver through a few options when the system restarts, but after the first time it gets a lot faster.
Thanks for the tip.
 

igor_kavinski

Diamond Member
Jul 27, 2020
3,757
2,222
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I'll have to look into turning off HT for a test.
One other thing you may want to test. With HT off, the CPU should run cooler than with HT on. Depending on your needs, keeping HT off might seem more appealing due to the limited cooling capacity of that form factor and also the location of the PC in the cabinet.
 

dark zero

Platinum Member
Jun 2, 2015
2,593
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I know you guys only look at high end, but low end Alderlake Killed it.

Those low power cpu like pentium 8505 or i3 1215u made whole used market obsolete.

Like Pentium 8505 can match i7 10610u

i3 1215U is more powerfull than top of the line Tigerlake i7 1195G7
The lowest market is a Celeron (7305 and 7300) that can't go more than 1 Ghz Clock speed in their performance core. And has only 1 P core and 4 E Cores.
I don't see how the low end Alderlake killed it.

Even Alder Lake -N has more chance that said processor.
 

hemedans

Member
Jan 31, 2015
48
6
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The lowest market is a Celeron (7305 and 7300) that can't go more than 1 Ghz Clock speed in their performance core. And has only 1 P core and 4 E Cores.
I don't see how the low end Alderlake killed it.

Even Alder Lake -N has more chance that said processor.
I specifically mentioned pentium 8505, which can be found in devices under $300.
 

nicalandia

Golden Member
Jan 10, 2019
1,618
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I tried searching for it. Didn't find a single laptop using it so far. Mind sharing a link?
Lenovo IdeaPad Flex 5i,

Samsung Galaxy Book 2
 

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