Afghans prepare for free elections

etech

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
10,597
0
0

Afghans prepare for free elections

"Afghanistan's new electoral commission has had its first formal engagement, as the country begins the process of preparing for elections that are due next year.

The six members of the commission met the United Nations special envoy for Afghanistan, Lakhdar Brahimi, and attended a meeting of donor countries' representatives.

The members of this new, interim electoral commission were named only a week ago.

The commission now faces the daunting task of registering millions of potential voters in a land where free elections have never been held.

..."

Think about it, a country that has known war and tribal problems for so many years is now preparing for it's first elections. There will still be problems to overcome and dangers to face, there always are at a birth. But it will be a wonderous thing to see.


(I know, it's good news I posted so I will be called a Bush lover by the resident cave dwellers.

Bring it on.)

I'd actually prefer that the above type of posting () be kept to a minium. I just wanted to show the perps how stupid they looked when they did it.

 

Hayabusa Rider

Admin Emeritus & Elite Member
Jan 26, 2000
50,872
4,216
126
Well, I'll call em as I see em, good or bad.

This is good.

Good luck to them :)
 

etech

Lifer
Oct 9, 1999
10,597
0
0
Originally posted by: Moonbeam
Oh goodie, Osama for president. Who's going to run for Big Oil?


Still talking about oil in Afghanistan moonie? You never did get that right.

You know if you only knew a little bit about the subject you might be able to make a contribution to this forum.

At least two other people recognized it a progress for the people of Afghanistan and were happy for them. Perhaps someday moonie you will be able to let go of the hate you hold on to. I hope you can.
 

JellyBaby

Diamond Member
Apr 21, 2000
9,159
1
81
Unfortunately, having free elections isn't the end-game, not by a long shot. We've seen many examples of countries, even after they were given this gift (think South America for some recent examples) become mired in problems, some of the very same kinds they had before open elections.
 

Tab

Lifer
Sep 15, 2002
12,145
0
71
Originally posted by: JellyBaby
Unfortunately, having free elections isn't the end-game, not by a long shot. We've seen many examples of countries, even after they were given this gift (think South America for some recent examples) become mired in problems, some of the very same kinds they had before open elections.
Yea, lets hope the canadites dont decide to kill each other :p
 

Scrooge2

Senior member
Jul 18, 2000
856
0
0
On an American patriotic emotional level I'm most happy about this.

However I have to agree with JellyBaby that this is could be the beggining of something wonderful or the catalyst of many problems ahead.

There are too many examples of countries that "forced democracy" too quickly. India, the Phillipines, some African countries, and a lot of the South American countries (which JellyBaby mentioned).

I think the focus of the problem lies in the people themselves. The Afghans need to become a more independant people and realize both their power to run their own country, and more importantly the responsibility that that power holds.

The fact that we, Americans, as a people can gather in public areans (such as this forum) shows that we are a capable people that has both interest and knowledge to our governing body. Afghans need that mentality and unfortunately it takes a lot of time and experience being a newly founded republic to build that political awareness.

I hope dearly that this will truely work out and not end up like some of those African rigged elections where "elected" representatives withold power for life.
 

Martin

Lifer
Jan 15, 2000
29,178
1
81
The way things are going currently, I doubt there'll be free elections outside of Kabul. But we'll have to wait and see.

 

MovingTarget

Diamond Member
Jun 22, 2003
8,994
100
106
Yes, many problems are going to occur with the upcoming election. It is the Afghan's first taste of such a thing. However, someone needs to be there to fully educate the public and supervise said elections to be sure they are administered properly and the populace isnt afraid to vote their mind. We also need to be there to insure something else...the afghan's first experience with peaceful transition of power should one party/candidate fall out of power... one of the true tests of a real democracy. anyway, I wish the people of Afghanistan luck. Congratulations...
 

LunarRay

Diamond Member
Mar 2, 2003
9,993
1
76
Originally posted by: Moonbeam
Oh goodie, Osama for president. Who's going to run for Big Oil?
I don't see how tribal loyalties and opposition to each other will unite under one leader but, who knows maybe with a government in control and the US out of the picture Afgani oil, natural gas and coal production may get restarted..

some mineral info

At its peak in the late 1970s, Afghanistan supplied 70%-90% of its natural gas output to the Soviet Union's natural gas grid via a link through Uzbekistan. In 1992, Afghan President Najibullah indicated that a new natural gas sales agreement with Russia was in progress. However, several former Soviet republics raised price and distribution issues and negotiations stalled. In the early 1990s, Afghanistan also discussed possible natural gas supply arrangements with Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and several Western European countries, but these talks never progressed further. Afghan natural gas fields include Djarquduk, Khowaja Gogerdak, and Yatimtaq, all of which are located within 20 miles of the northern town of Sheberghan in Jowzjan province. In 1999, work resumed on the repair of a distribution pipeline to Mazar-i-Sharif. Spur pipelines to a small power plant and fertilizer plant also were repaired and completed. Mazar-i-Sharif is now receiving natural gas from the pipeline. A training center for natural gas workers is being reopened in Mazar-i-Sharif with Russian assistance. The possibility of exporting a small quantity of natural gas through the existing pipeline into Uzbekistan also is reportedly being considered.

Soviet estimates from the late 1970s placed Afghanistan's proven and probable oil and condensate reserves at 95 million barrels. Oil exploration and development work as well as plans to build a 10,000-bbl/d refinery were halted after the 1979 Soviet invasion. A very small amount of crude oil, about 300 barrels per day (bbl/d), is produced at the Angot field in the northern Sar-i-Pol province.

 

ASK THE COMMUNITY