About Corsair Power Supply

Jan 31, 2017
65
3
6
Hello! :) I have a question regarding my PSU which is a 'Corsair VS650'. Please have a look at the Power specifications of both the PSUs below:

Corsair VS650: [http://www.corsair.com/en-in/vs-seriestm-vs650-650-watt-power-supply]
Corsair VS650 ATX Power Supply
AC Input Rating DC Output Rating
AC Input: 200V - 240V DC Output +3.3V +5V +12V -12V +5Vsb
Current: 5A Max Load 20A 20A 50A 0.3A 2.5A

Frequency: 47Hz - 63Hz Maximum Combined Wattage 120W 600W 3.6W 12.5W
Total Power: 650W

EVGA 500W: [http://www.evga.com/products/Specs/PSU.aspx?pn=81e4cda4-e770-4372-91a9-55ab4bb5b12b]
Rail +3.3V +5V +12V +5Vsb -12V
Max output 24A 20A 40A 3A 0.3A
40A

120W 480W 15W 3.6W
Total 500W @ +40C

Why do the Corsair VS650 has 20A in +3.3V and 2.5A in +5Vsb (which has a bit less Amperes) when compared to EVGA 500W PSU which has 24A in +3.3V and 3A in +5Vsb? Will that cause any problems to my PC components not supplying enough power? Or is that normal (enough)?

Thanks in advance!






 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
15,841
6,885
146
Will that cause any problems to my PC components not supplying enough power? Or is that normal (enough)?
System specs are always nice to know, but you would likely be fine. They are both within ATX spec on those rails.

The 12v rail amperage is what truly matters depending on your graphics card (generally the bigger the unit, the more amperage provided).
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Balakrishna Prasad

lehtv

Elite Member
Dec 8, 2010
11,900
74
91
Why do the Corsair VS650 has 20A in +3.3V and 2.5A in +5Vsb (which has a bit less Amperes) when compared to EVGA 500W PSU which has 24A in +3.3V and 3A in +5Vsb? Will that cause any problems to my PC components not supplying enough power? Or is that normal (enough)?
Only +12V amperes really matters for modern computers. You should be looking at the +12V spec, and the available connectors so you know you can connect all your parts to the PSU without using adapters. But even more than that, you should be looking at whether the PSU is reliable or not.

Specs don't really say anything about reliability, apart from the overall temperature rating. EVGA's 40C rating is okay and probably higher than that of VS650, while 50C would be ideal. But to really determine reliability, you have to look at power supply reviews and find out whether the unit actually keeps its voltages stable, and whether it uses long-lasting components. Ideally, it should use Japanese (e.g. Nippon Chemi-Con, Rubycon etc.) or Teapo capacitors rated at 105C. Anything rated at 85C or anything by lesser capacitors brands is likely to last a shorter amount of time.

At minimum, I suggest buying Seasonic S12II series units. If you can't find those, then EVGA's B-series (500B, for instance) are fine, and if you can't find those, then the even more basic EVGA units are fine.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Balakrishna Prasad
Jan 31, 2017
65
3
6
Thank you all for the information. :) I just wanted to know about my PSU and always wanted to give my PC a good Power Supply.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY