Abbott is an idiot. Free market approach to failing electrical grid.

Paratus

Lifer
Jun 4, 2004
15,423
9,953
146

Not only is this a terrible idea at pretty much every level, it's also really shitty from an environmental standpoint.

Republicans are basically living caricatures. It's lunacy.

I see we made the right move investing in a whole home generator. Now we have to lose both electricity and natural gas to be without power.

Probably need to consider adding solar panels and batteries once my roof needs replacing in several years

I’m sure the Bitcoin miners will be exempt from conserving power during the worst of the summertime demand as that won’t be during a “storm”.
 
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SmCaudata

Senior member
Oct 8, 2006
968
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Yeah. I'm in WI and gerrymandering here is scary. Since Walker they seem to be actively seeking the bottom 10 for most quality of life metrics. I'm planning on looking at geothermal and solar with my LP backup. Combined with BEV with house backup function I should be able to get adequately off the grid. I also have a well, and given the city water issues here recently I'm really glad...
 

compcons

Golden Member
Oct 22, 2004
1,986
798
136
I see we made the right move investing in a whole home generator. Now we have to lose both electricity and natural gas to be without power....
Very little chance of that happening.

Again.

Maybe get a portable that can run on gasoline and propane and power at least the furnace blower and a fridge.
 

UNCjigga

Lifer
Dec 12, 2000
23,781
6,787
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This quote from the article is hilarious:
"If the grid starts to go wobbly, as it did when winter storm Uri froze up power plants in February 2021, miners could quickly shut down to conserve energy for homes and businesses. At least two Bitcoin miners have already volunteered to do just that.

Yes, because the FYGM Sovereign Citizen DeFi Libertarians are known to cut their own consumption for "the greater good" when resources are scarce!
 

dank69

Lifer
Oct 6, 2009
31,918
20,162
136
This quote from the article is hilarious:
"If the grid starts to go wobbly, as it did when winter storm Uri froze up power plants in February 2021, miners could quickly shut down to conserve energy for homes and businesses. At least two Bitcoin miners have already volunteered to do just that.

Yes, because the FYGM Sovereign Citizen DeFi Libertarians are known to cut their own consumption for "the greater good" when resources are scarce!
JFC
 

Paratus

Lifer
Jun 4, 2004
15,423
9,953
146
Very little chance of that happening.

Again.

Maybe get a portable that can run on gasoline and propane and power at least the furnace blower and a fridge.
Father-in-law did that. Bought a dual fuel portable with electric start (he's in his 70's) and had an electrician install a manual transfer switch with generator plug. If we are without power for days at a time again he'll run his fridge, freezer, and furnace off the generator and they'll come over to our place until the power comes back since ours can run the entire house AC included.
 

Aikouka

Lifer
Nov 27, 2001
30,187
756
126
I just... don't understand the mental gymnastics required to believe that this is a good approach. To my understanding, Texas has a problem with the rigidity and reliability of their network in extreme situations (high/low temperatures), which are becoming a bit more common now. So, instead of solidifying their infrastructure (e.g. winterizing, energy storage, etc.), which is the most direct solution, they want to bring in more demand (ignoring the wasteful nature of crypto mining) and then hope that demand will willfully shutter itself when asked nicely. 🙄
 

JimKiler

Diamond Member
Oct 10, 2002
3,516
155
106
This quote from the article is hilarious:
"If the grid starts to go wobbly, as it did when winter storm Uri froze up power plants in February 2021, miners could quickly shut down to conserve energy for homes and businesses. At least two Bitcoin miners have already volunteered to do just that.

Yes, because the FYGM Sovereign Citizen DeFi Libertarians are known to cut their own consumption for "the greater good" when resources are scarce!
They will say no and cite they have rights to electricity. And even if they did want to shut down would they know when to power down? I doubt it and then over time they would be less inclined to power down because it will get bungled.
 

JimKiler

Diamond Member
Oct 10, 2002
3,516
155
106
I just... don't understand the mental gymnastics required to believe that this is a good approach. To my understanding, Texas has a problem with the rigidity and reliability of their network in extreme situations (high/low temperatures), which are becoming a bit more common now. So, instead of solidifying their infrastructure (e.g. winterizing, energy storage, etc.), which is the most direct solution, they want to bring in more demand (ignoring the wasteful nature of crypto mining) and then hope that demand will willfully shutter itself when asked nicely. 🙄
There is no electric grid problems in Texas. I look forward to Trump calling it a democrat hoax in the future.
 

Homerboy

Lifer
Mar 1, 2000
30,170
4,056
126
so the idea is to bring in power hungry users, so the free market then builds infrastructure to support those new power hungry users. And if the shit hits the fan again (which it will), you then ask those power hungry users (who rely on the power to produce their "product" (I use that term loosely in this case) to pretty please stop using all that power so there's enough for everyone? And if they don't?....

OR

require those providing power now to invest in upgrading their existing infrastructure by winterizing and securing what's already in place? (A tried and true method in 49 other states)

Man Abbott and DeSantis really are racing to see who is the dumbest mother fucker in state gov't.
 

K1052

Lifer
Aug 21, 2003
39,703
16,921
136
I just... don't understand the mental gymnastics required to believe that this is a good approach. To my understanding, Texas has a problem with the rigidity and reliability of their network in extreme situations (high/low temperatures), which are becoming a bit more common now. So, instead of solidifying their infrastructure (e.g. winterizing, energy storage, etc.), which is the most direct solution, they want to bring in more demand (ignoring the wasteful nature of crypto mining) and then hope that demand will willfully shutter itself when asked nicely. 🙄
Natural gas production freezes out when it gets too cold because none of it is winterized here. Fortunately they have done absolutely nothing to prevent it from happening again and the Republicans want to rely on gas even more because it is "reliable".

Imma take my Austin housing market gain and peace out of this state.
 

nakedfrog

No Lifer
Apr 3, 2001
53,765
6,262
126
I just... don't understand the mental gymnastics required to believe that this is a good approach. To my understanding, Texas has a problem with the rigidity and reliability of their network in extreme situations (high/low temperatures), which are becoming a bit more common now. So, instead of solidifying their infrastructure (e.g. winterizing, energy storage, etc.), which is the most direct solution, they want to bring in more demand (ignoring the wasteful nature of crypto mining) and then hope that demand will willfully shutter itself when asked nicely. 🙄
Well, it sure is a handy thing there's no existing precedent showing Texas choosing protection of corporate profits over human life!
 
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PowerEngineer

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 2001
3,444
540
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Well, I have to say that when it comes to maintaining the minute-to-minute balance between generation and load, there is certainly some benefit to having interruptible loads as an option. This will become increasing true as we move away from dispatchable fossil-fueled generation toward take-what-nature-delivers wind and solar generation. However, this isn't going to do much to address the problems caused by severe weather events (e.g. extreme loads and fragile infrastructure).

And IMHO the Bitcoin transaction process consumes way too much power. No country, state, or city should be looking to attract Bitcoin miners because of the increased costs that other ratepayers will see. Bitcoin needs to transition to a much less energy intensive process.
 
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Ajay

Lifer
Jan 8, 2001
11,218
5,033
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What a freaking bizarre state. How stupid does one have to be too screw up natural gas production? There's the stuff called insulation - been around for a while ;) . Also, thermo-electric pipe wraps. Heh, let’s just just vent a million cubic feet of gas instead and just call it a day. To the rest, let them eat cake. Glad the Mrs and I decide against moving to Austin ~10 years ago.
 
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