A Guy at my University is suing N*Sync for song theft!!!

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Kanalua, Jan 23, 2002.

  1. Kanalua

    Kanalua Diamond Member

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    Here's the University Newspaper link.

    Brigham Young University student and songwriter Clinton Poulsen is accusing Justin Timberlake of N'SYNC of stealing parts of one of his songs and putting it in the group's "Celebrity" album.

    "You have to understand that it's not the same exact song," said Poulsen, 20, a freshman from Damascus, Md. "It's not like he took it straight the way it was. A lot of the lyrics, melody, and production are the same and we had some experts analyze the song and there's no doubt in their minds that he definitely took parts of my song and put it in his."

    Poulsen alleges that while under contract with Wright Entertainment, the song "See Right Through You," which he wrote last March, was placed into Timberlake's hands and put onto the "Celebrity" album under Timberlake's name.

    "Justin had at least five different ways of access to my song, including my manager Doug Brown," said Poulsen. "There were also two secretaries in the office who are pretty young and are really good friends with Justin and members of his group and they had copies of my song."

    Brown, vice president and artist developer of Wright Entertainment, also manages N'SYNC. Poulsen said Brown originally denied Timberlake ever heard the song but hinted that it was a possibility and said he would sit down and confront Timberlake about it.

    "But we never heard back from him," Poulsen said. "I kind of had to cut ties with him because there was no trust there at all."

    Poulsen said N'SYNC producer Max Martin encouraged him to enter a contest on the Internet site Tonos.com. "See Right Through You" is the song that he wrote for that contest.

    In legal papers sent to Jive Records and several other record companies, Poulsen's attorney, Wayne Rooks, is ordering immediate ceasing "from any further manufacture, sale, copying reproduction, public performance or other exploitation" of "See Right Through You."

    "They have come back to us denying having used any portion of this material," Rooks said. "The ball is sort of in our court now."

    Senior director of business affairs for Zomba Music Publishing, Leslie Greene, who represents Timberlake, refused to comment.

    N'SYNC's "Celebrity" CD hit stores July 24 last year, and in its first week alone, it sold more than 1.8 million copies. Since then it has gone platinum five times.

    Poulsen said that although he has come in contact with Timberlake several times, he wouldn't consider them friends.
     
  2. pulse8

    pulse8 Lifer

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    I would say it depends on the similarities.

    Just because they go from G to A in two different songs doesn't mean one stole it from another. :)
     
  3. rahvin

    rahvin Elite Member

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    My condolances on attending BYU. Poor kid....
     
  4. Kanalua

    Kanalua Diamond Member

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    << My condolances on attending BYU. Poor kid.... >>



    Thanks, it's not that bad...helps to be Mormon...
     
  5. Logix

    Logix Diamond Member

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    Justin Timberlake writes N*Sync's songs?

    Do those five guys have anything to do with the song writing at all? :confused:
     
  6. chibchakan

    chibchakan Platinum Member

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    << My condolances on attending BYU. Poor kid.... >>



    LMAO :D
     
  7. Skyclad1uhm1

    Skyclad1uhm1 Lifer

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    Uhm.... Who in his sane mind would admit to writing songs like that?
     
  8. perry

    perry Diamond Member

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    << Uhm.... Who in his sane mind would admit to writing songs like that? >>


    It's all about the Benajmins..
     
  9. PeeluckyDuckee

    PeeluckyDuckee Diamond Member

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    Believe it or not, this kind of practice is considered the norm in the music industry. I've heard many songs, heck, even some of the song writers themselves admit to such practice. Change a few notes here and there, change the lyrics a bit, and you've got yourself a whole new song :) When you steal, normally you don't steal from music in the same language, usually its in some other language so that its not as easily recognizeable.

    If you're going to steal, be smart about it. Its obvious they've got their balls caught between the doorway :p
     
  10. Kev

    Kev Lifer

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    you mean there are people out there who are able to distinguish one pop song from another?
     
  11. Kanalua

    Kanalua Diamond Member

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    Was the talk of some of my classes today...how embarassing...
     
  12. SuperTool

    SuperTool Lifer

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    My school is suing HP for patent infringement on instruction scheduling scheme in CPU. :)
    Link
    100M please :D
     
  13. xirtam

    xirtam Diamond Member

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    << "You have to understand that it's not the same exact song," said Poulsen, 20, a freshman from Damascus, Md. "It's not like he took it straight the way it was. A lot of the lyrics, melody, and production are the same and we had some experts analyze the song and there's no doubt in their minds that he definitely took parts of my song and put it in his." >>



    Seriously. Who made up the idea of ownership of these styles of music anyway. I hate the idea of intellectual property -- you can't really prove anything. "Mommy! I thought of it first!"

    When is a song considered "stolen?" Now if you plagiarize the words, I can see a reason for the argument. But what if the idea of the song is to produce the same feeling? Or get across the same message another way? Or use the same genre? Perhaps all country songs are the rightful property of whoever came up with the idea of singing country. We're taking this whole thing way too far. I'm all for piracy, as long as it's grown-up piracy. All too often, these legal battles take on strongly childish undertones. "Let's see how much of this we can steal before we get caught!" "Mommy! He took my eraser... I mean... song lyrics!"



    << "We had some experts analyze the song" >>



    That's what gets me. What are they analyzing? Anyone know what makes a song stolen? Should we throw out "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" because it has the same melody as the alphabet song?

    Now, don't get me wrong. I hate N*Sync just as much as the next guy. But over their poor quality music -- not over their alleged song-stealing. What's worse is that the song went platinum. It's a sad, sad day for America.