A fatwa against terrorism

neodyn55

Senior member
Oct 16, 2007
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Recently, a fatwa was issued against terrorism in India:

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/t...sia/article4045862.ece

For the lazy:

An ultra-conservative Islamic seminary that has inspired extremist groups including the Taleban has issued a fatwa against terrorism, in what is believed to be the first edict of its kind.

The Darool-Uloom Deoband, a 150 year-old India-based institution that holds influence over thousands of smaller Islamic schools across the subcontinent, many of which have attracted British students in recent years, issued the fatwa at an outdoor peace conference attended by thousands of clerics and students in Delhi

Note that these aren't moderate muslims speaking out. This is actually a seminary that inspired the Taliban.

If you think it's too good to be true, you may not be wrong. The gathering also had this to say:

However, some of the largest cheers came from the all-male crowd when the United States and its policies were criticised.The deputy rector of the Darul-Uloom, Hazrat Maulana Qari Sayed Mohammed Usman, said: ?Whenever Christian and American interests are hurt in any part of the world, they take prompt action to set things right even at the cost of human lives. They maintain silence though when Muslims are the victims.? He went on to criticise the US for its support to Israel.

Another article also mentioned that the seminary considered the actions of the US in Iraq to be "terrorism". However, consider that it's hard switching from being inspiration for the Taliban to being US fanbois.

In addition, India is one of the worst affected countries in terms of various forms of terrorism. Islamic terrorist attacks in India afflict all sections of the community.

Many people make distinctions between "moderate" Muslims and the crazed Jehadis. I believe this is a vindication of their beliefs; that the support and co-operation of the Muslim community is essential for the WoT. Several others, even on this forum, consider the Muslim community by and large not doing enough to suppress the jehadis - will this convince them that things are changing?

Finally, will this mark the beginning of the end of islamic terrorism? If a school as radical as this can change it's positions, won't many others follow? of course, this isn't going to change much of the festering conflicts currently feeding the extremists, but will this persuade "swing voters" out of the path of terrorism?


 

Zebo

Elite Member
Jul 29, 2001
39,398
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Originally posted by: palehorse
:thumbsup: we need more of this.

Don't be so naive this is for totally for Western consumption. They still allow for jihad as the reporter notates. The Deobandis (and other Muslims who speak out) treat concepts of "terrorism" and "jihad" as separate actions, and the equivocation is afforded by adjectives such as "unjust" and "innocent"

http://economictimes.indiatime...rticleshow/3089426.cms
 

palehorse

Lifer
Dec 21, 2005
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Originally posted by: Zebo
Originally posted by: palehorse
:thumbsup: we need more of this.

Don't be so naive this is for totally for Western consumption. They still allow for jihad as the reporter notates. The Deobandis (and other Muslims who speak out) treat concepts of "terrorism" and "jihad" as separate actions, and the equivocation is afforded by adjectives such as "unjust" and "innocent"

http://economictimes.indiatime...rticleshow/3089426.cms

As long as it disparages attacks against civilians (terrorism), it's a small step in the right direction. If they still retain the balls to attack our military forces, then so be it... I have a little more respect for any enemy of mine who sticks to military targets.

But you're probably right... this may not have any effect whatsoever on the behavior of sick groups like the Taliban.

We'll see...