7700K: My shortest lived CPU upgrade ever (Feb 6, 2019 update)

Page 2 - Seeking answers? Join the AnandTech community: where nearly half-a-million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.
Mar 10, 2004
28,443
201
126
#26
AFAIK, BIOS is full clock speed but very little load, so you get higher temps than desktop idle.
 

UsandThem

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
10,575
429
136
#27
You're going to be on that 6700K for quite a while if you're worried about temps higher than what you have now.

My 9900K (and previous 8700K and 8086K) would idle higher in the BIOS. Once in Windows they idle in the 20s.
It's not about being worried about the temps, as they are well within the safe range, but it does suck that my Noctua cooler spins around 200 RPM higher at the desktop compared to the 6700k. I definitely can hear the fan when it's spinning that high.

Anyways, after mulling over my options, I think what I will do is mail my 7700k to Silicon Lottery, and have them delid it. They only charge $39 for the 7700k, so by the time I would have to buy everything to do it myself, it should be cheaper just to let them do it. Hopefully the temps are much better when it comes back, and if so, I will throw it in and sell the 6700k.
 

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
17,194
56
126
#28
so by the time I would have to buy everything to do it myself, it should be cheaper
but you would have the tools to delid that thing again, and any other 115x cpu you run into be it for family or friends.

You get enough gallaium to delid about 10+ times on top.

You really cant mess up when you delid using a tool vs a razor.
I have delided several 4790k's and 6700k's.

They were not difficult at all.
Net reduction in temps were anywhere from 10C - 22C on the 4790k which had a poor IHS.
 

UsandThem

Super Moderator
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
10,575
429
136
#29
So I kind of sat the CPU to the side until I ordered a delidding kit.........and I forgot to do it.

When cleaning out my component closet I came across the 7700k again, and decided to reinstall it and see if I could figure out why it was running so hot. After installing it this time, I went line-by-line in my UEFI CPU area, and noticed the Taichi automatically overclocks the CPU by using "multicore enhancement". So basically instead of one core at 4.5 Ghz, and the rest at 4.4 GHz, it was making them all boost to the higher multiplier, and using extra voltage in the process. With this setting enabled, I was idling pretty much around 50c, load temps well into the mid 70s, and my Noctua cooler was really having to ramp up the RPMs (and noise) to keep up with the higher temps.

So I manually set it to Intel specs, and viola, the temps are only slightly warmer than my 6700k. Even when I played around by manually overclocking it a bit, the temps still stayed much better than the "multicore enhancement" junk (idle around 33c, load in the low-to-mid 60s). Honestly, the motherboard manufacturers should not do that a stock settings, and let users decide if they want to do it. So hopefully this will help someone else in the future with similar issues.

So in the end, I did a small overclock at 4.7 Ghz and left it in. Now I can throw the 6700k in my youngest son's PC, and sell his Kaby Lake i5 as he could use the extra threads now that he is really getting into game programming and such.
 
Feb 23, 2017
458
344
106
#30
Default mobo settings seem to have become a joke in recent times. They're fine if you know what to expect, but do not in any way adhere to the stock configuration recommended by Intel. The 9900K was a prime example of this, though it clearly had been happening for generations, with the only apparent difference being that the 9900K far exceeded listed TDP at stock, whereas the 7700K was barely exceeding it, if at all, hence less critique of this area with the 7700K...and likely 8700K too.
 
Feb 25, 2004
21,017
28
106
#31
Default mobo settings seem to have become a joke in recent times. They're fine if you know what to expect, but do not in any way adhere to the stock configuration recommended by Intel. The 9900K was a prime example of this, though it clearly had been happening for generations, with the only apparent difference being that the 9900K far exceeded listed TDP at stock, whereas the 7700K was barely exceeding it, if at all, hence less critique of this area with the 7700K...and likely 8700K too.
IIRC Intel stopped making their own branded motherboards making comparing motherboards to a true stock configuration more difficult.
 

Topweasel

Diamond Member
Oct 19, 2000
4,742
345
136
#32
IIRC Intel stopped making their own branded motherboards making comparing motherboards to a true stock configuration more difficult.
Also people seem to differ on what stock means. There is the CPU settings and Intel's recommended settings on the motherboard. These two are not in agreement with each other. Take the 9900K Intel CPU specs and the settings intel has motherboard manufacturers follow through on their enthusiast retail boards. This means that on one hand Intel says hey the CPU is a 90w CPU that will go above that temporarily. Then on the other Intel has the CPU running at max frequency in theory all the way up to 210w, but lets say between 140-160w, and if you don't have enough cooling will basically always be running against it's thermal limit (always hot). Both these are Intel's are both Intel Stock settings and turning off ME and lowering PL2 are meant for OEM's to control thermal limits to match their cooling.
 


ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS