75 Watt Light Bulb in a 60 Watt Fixture?!

mad0maxx

Senior member
Feb 3, 2006
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75 Watt Light Bulb in a 60 Watt Fixture?!

We have a ceiling fan with two 60 watt light bulbs and one 75 watt light bulb and the fixture says use 60 watt lamp max... would this setup make the light bulb blow up or would that part of the house be pulling too much electricity to cause it to blow up?

On the side note the fixture I am talking about is not in my room and I did not setup the light bulbs that way.
 

mad0maxx

Senior member
Feb 3, 2006
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So the improper wattage is the cause of the bulb blowing up or is it that part of the house is pulling too much power. Taking in consideration that we have alot of electronics in that part of the house.
 

BigJ

Lifer
Nov 18, 2001
21,335
1
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Worst case scenario, you cause a fire, insurance finds out that a higher rated bulb than maximum was used and you aren't covered. It's an extreme, and rarely if ever happens.

Realistically, you'll be fine but the bulb will blow earlier than it's rated life.

However, if you do it long enough you may wind up destroying the fixture and having to replace the cover, casing, or light socket.
 

doze

Platinum Member
Jul 26, 2005
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The rating is due to the build quality of the fixture, meaning that anything over 60W could be a fire hazard as it puts out more heat.
 

Seekermeister

Golden Member
Oct 3, 2006
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The wattage rating on fixture is based on the wiring with the fixture, and also the heat resistance of the fixture. It has nothing to do with the house wiring. I have seen fixture that got too hot and became scorched. If the bulbs burns out prematurely, it is because they get too hot. I suppose that there is a possibility of a fire hazard, but not a great one.
 

Midlander

Platinum Member
Dec 21, 2002
2,456
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Originally posted by: Seekermeister
The wattage rating on fixture is based on the wiring with the fixture, and also the heat resistance of the fixture. It has nothing to do with the house wiring. I have seen fixture that got too hot and became scorched. If the bulbs burns out prematurely, it is because they get too hot. I suppose that there is a possibility of a fire hazard, but not a great one.

Good answer. This is the way I understand it, too. :beer:
 

LS20

Banned
Jan 22, 2002
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ive always gone over and have never had a problem. if you need more light output, just go for flourescent
 

WhoBeDaPlaya

Diamond Member
Sep 15, 2000
7,414
401
126
Another vote for compact fluorescents.
15W over should be fine. You should see all the ceiling light fixtures in my townhouse when I first moved in. They were using 100W bulbs in 60W rated fixtures - the damn insulation layer was gooey and fscking half melted :|
 

MrWizzard

Platinum Member
Mar 24, 2002
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Originally posted by: BigJ
Worst case scenario, you cause a fire, insurance finds out that a higher rated bulb than maximum was used and you aren't covered. It's an extreme, and rarely if ever happens.

Realistically, you'll be fine but the bulb will blow earlier than it's rated life.

However, if you do it long enough you may wind up destroying the fixture and having to replace the cover, casing, or light socket.

What?! that would never happen, insurance covers stupidity accidents too you know. AHEM look at all the auto accidents they cover, they cover DUI accidents unless the driver was pre-excluded from the policy......

If he put it in to purposely cause a fire that is different. But if he put it in out of ignorance and started a fire the insurance would cover it.

Big difference to insurance companies between purposeful and accidental.

But having post this topic he now knows it's a bad idea.

EDIT: I guess your right if you are assuming he did it purposly to start a fire.


 

BurnItDwn

Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
26,059
1,541
126
I am a pyromaniac and I like fire. Therefore, I suggest you go right ahead and put that 75 watt bulb in the 60 watt max fixture.
After all, there is clearly no reason why they would have a max value suggested.
 

Aimster

Lifer
Jan 5, 2003
16,129
2
0
I had a house fire because of lightbulbs .... insurance covered everything.

but it wasnt the kind of light you are tallking about. It was fluorescent
 

BigJ

Lifer
Nov 18, 2001
21,335
1
81
Originally posted by: MrWizzard
Originally posted by: BigJ
Worst case scenario, you cause a fire, insurance finds out that a higher rated bulb than maximum was used and you aren't covered. It's an extreme, and rarely if ever happens.

Realistically, you'll be fine but the bulb will blow earlier than it's rated life.

However, if you do it long enough you may wind up destroying the fixture and having to replace the cover, casing, or light socket.

What?! that would never happen, insurance covers stupidity accidents too you know. AHEM look at all the auto accidents they cover, they cover DUI accidents unless the driver was pre-excluded from the policy......

If he put it in to purposely cause a fire that is different. But if he put it in out of ignorance and started a fire the insurance would cover it.

Big difference to insurance companies between purposeful and accidental.

But having post this topic he now knows it's a bad idea.

That's why I said it's a worse case scenario. If the insurance company does in fact find out that an electrical fire was caused due to your negligence, they have a basis for denying your claim.
 

Strk

Lifer
Nov 23, 2003
10,198
4
76
Light bulbs are cheap. Quit being stingy and put the proper bulb in the fixture.
 

PowerEngineer

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 2001
3,543
709
136
Originally posted by: Midlander
Originally posted by: Seekermeister
The wattage rating on fixture is based on the wiring with the fixture, and also the heat resistance of the fixture. It has nothing to do with the house wiring. I have seen fixture that got too hot and became scorched. If the bulbs burns out prematurely, it is because they get too hot. I suppose that there is a possibility of a fire hazard, but not a great one.

Good answer. This is the way I understand it, too. :beer:

Yes, this is correct. The limitation is based on the temperature that the fixture must reach in order to dissipate the heat generated by the bulbs. Higher wattage bulbs lead to higher temperatures and greater chance of fire.

 

Amused

Elite Member
Apr 14, 2001
55,791
13,752
146
I always overclock my light fixtures. ;)

It's all about heat. Going one step up has never been a problem for me.
 

Vette73

Lifer
Jul 5, 2000
21,503
8
0
Originally posted by: WhoBeDaPlaya
Another vote for compact fluorescents.
15W over should be fine. You should see all the ceiling light fixtures in my townhouse when I first moved in. They were using 100W bulbs in 60W rated fixtures - the damn insulation layer was gooey and fscking half melted :|

Yep.