7-Year-Old Migrant Girl Dies Of Dehydration In Border Patrol Custody

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Jun 12, 2005
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Wow, you even know the choices he had to make. I guess since you say it was such a straightforward choice, then I should take you word for it, you know, since you've known him so long. Does he know you dont like him?

You should be a reporter, since you have all the facts.
Do YOU think taking a child into the desert with no food or water is a good idea?
 
Jun 12, 2005
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Do you agree that authorities have a duty of care for minors they have detained?
Of course. But at this point we do not know the sequence of events after they were placed into custody or what was done or not done.

All we do know is that the father took his young daughter into the desert with no food or water.
 
Jun 12, 2005
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I think most "normal" parents would do whatever they thought they had to, to ensure a better future for their children.



It's painfully obvious you've never been a parent.
Go into the desert with no food or water or stay with the caravan in TJ where there is food and water.


Never been a parent? LOL My son is 35 years old.
 

outriding

Golden Member
Feb 20, 2002
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Well. You detained someone who just crossed the desert and notice they have no food or water.

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure they might be at some risk and maybe a maybe a check by some moderately competent medical personnal should be performed

But sweet baby Jeebus. If you combined the intelligence between pcgeek and killwhoever you could not even get the smarts to figure it out
 
Nov 4, 2004
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Do YOU think taking a child into the desert with no food or water is a good idea?
Why does it matter what I think if you've already stated the facts? Tell me, what's his personal life like, you seem so sure and just in the judgement you laid out. I mean, all i have to go on is the news article, so the inside scoop is all you.
 
Sep 5, 2000
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No, I don't.

Are you saying that the Border Patrol should be manned by doctors?
obviously they need proper medical staff to deal with the people crossing. Unless you think its their fault and god will sort it out.
 

Lanyap

Elite Member
Dec 23, 2000
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Latest article from WaPo with more details. Looks like CBP did everything they could under the circumstances. For those who keep saying she died from dehydration, you need to read the original article posted by the op. The hospital where she was treated indicated that septic shock was another factor so she had a serious infection that played a major role in her death.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/worl...6a6f3ce8199_story.html?utm_term=.2a4bda2e0c9a

Twenty-seven hours before she died at an El Paso children’s hospital, 7-year-old Jakelin Caal walked across the U.S. border with her father and 161 other migrants outside Antelope Wells, N.M.

It was 9:15 p.m. on Dec. 6, and the small, remote U.S. border crossing was closed for the night. There were four Border Patrol agents on duty, and no medical staff.

The migrants skirted barriers and crossed into the United States. Like most Central American asylum seekers who have been arriving at the border in record numbers, they were not seeking to evade capture but to turn themselves in.

That night, as elsewhere when large groups of parents with children appear at remote border outposts, U.S. agents strained to accommodate the needs of those in their custody. The agents radioed the nearest Border Patrol station in Lordsburg, 90 minutes away, to request a bus, the only one available along that barren desert span of the New Mexico boot heel.

What unfolded over the next eight hours, as Jakelin’s condition deteriorated but went unnoticed by agents and perhaps her father, is now the subject of an internal investigation at the Department of Homeland Security, and congressional Democrats are demanding a full accounting and meetings with Customs and Border Protection officials

On Tuesday, three days after the child’s death, CBP Commissioner Kevin McAleenan told the Senate Judiciary Committee that his agency’s Border Patrol stations and their rudimentary holding cells were ill-suited to handle so many families and children. More medical staff and social workers were needed to handle the demographic change, he said.

McAleenan did not mention the girl’s death, which was disclosed by CBP only after The Washington Post inquired about it Thursday evening. A DHS official said Friday the agency will review its policy on reporting deaths of migrants in U.S. custody.

Homeland Security officials have urged lawmakers to pass legislation addressing what they say are gaps in U.S. immigration and asylum laws that have induced more migrants to bring children in hopes of avoiding detention and deportation. Last month, more than 25,000 members of family groups crossed the border this way, the highest one-month total ever recorded.

Yet Jakelin’s death last week has put scrutiny on the surge — and the care of migrant families in U.S. custody — like no other recent event.

The girl’s father, Nery Caal, 29, remains in the El Paso area but has not spoken publicly. According to Guatemalan consular officials, the family is from the Alta Verapaz department, one of the country’s poorest, and the family’s primary language is Q’eqchi’, a pre-Columbian Mayan tongue.

Nery Caal has been granted a provisional release from CBP custody, according to consular officials, who said they are assisting with the repatriation of his daughter’s body.

This account of the events leading up to Jakelin’s death on Dec. 8 from dehydration, shock and liver failure is based on reports and interviews with consular officers as well as Homeland Security and Customs and Border Protection officials, who deny the agency is responsible for what happened.

White House and DHS officials Friday blamed the tragedy on the girl’s father and the smuggling organizations that send busloads of people across the border in numbers officials say are designed to overwhelm U.S. agents.

Before reaching the border that night, Jakelin Caal had nothing to eat or drink for days, according to CBP, citing statements from her father. But though the girl’s condition was worsening and her fever was soaring toward 106 degrees through the middle of the night, U.S. officials say her father did not tell agents.

“There were plenty of opportunities, if her father had noticed anything and brought it to agents’ attention,” said a CBP official who briefed reporters Friday, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

“There was no indication she had any health issues,” the official said.

According to an account of Jakelin’s death posted Friday on the Department of Homeland Security’s Facebook page, the agency said the girl showed no sign of distress during a basic, routine check after the group of 163 was taken into custody by three agents.

“The initial screening revealed no evidence of health issues. During the screening, the father denied that either he or his daughter were ill. This denial was recorded on Form I-779 signed by the father,” the DHS account said. The form was supplied in English, but CBP officials said agents provided a verbal translation.

“At this time, they were offered water and food and had access to restrooms,” DHS said.

It’s unclear whether Nery Caal attempted to feed his daughter or give her water during the middle of the night while the family waited with dozens of others in a loading bay next to the border crossing.

When the bus arrived from Lordsburg, border agents filled it with 50 children and other juveniles who had arrived with the group, following standard CBP procedures that require agents to prioritize children who arrive without an adult or guardian.

Jakelin and her father would have to wait longer.

It wasn’t until around 5 a.m. — nearly eight hours after they had crossed the border — that the bus returned to pick up a second load of passengers, which included the 7-year-old and her father.

At that time, Nery Caal told agents his daughter was sick, according to DHS, and agents called ahead to notify the station of her condition.

A few minutes into the 90-minute drive, the feverish child began vomiting. The bus continued on its route toward Lordsburg, which CBP officials said Friday was the fastest way for the girl to receive medical attention.

The bus arrived at the station shortly before 6:30 a.m. on Dec. 7. “At that point, the father notified agents that the child was not breathing,” the DHS account states. “Border Patrol EMTs began medical care and requested an ambulance.

By then the girl’s fever was 105.9 degrees. “Agents providing medical care revived the child twice,” according to DHS.

The nearest major pediatric hospital, in El Paso, was a four-hour drive away. Agents ordered a helicopter evacuation, and at 8:51 a.m. on Dec. 7, Jakelin arrived at Providence Children’s Hospital. Border Patrol agents drove her father separately.

Jakelin died 15 hours later in the hospital’s intensive care unit, according to DHS and consular officials. Her father was present.

Asked by a reporter Friday whether the administration is “taking any responsibility for the girl’s death,” White House spokesman Hogan Gidley said: “Does the administration take responsibility for a parent taking a child on a trek through Mexico to get to this country? No.”

“If we could just come together and pass some common-sense laws to disincentivize people from coming up from the border and encourage them to do it the right way, the legal way, then those types of deaths, those types of assaults, those types of rapes, the child smuggling, the human trafficking, that would all come to an end,” Gidley said. “And we hope Democrats join the president.”

Senior Democratic lawmakers, including members who will soon chair the House Judiciary and Homeland Security committees, sent a letter Friday to the DHS inspector general urging an investigation, citing “the seriousness of this tragedy and the many questions that remain.”

“The investigation should focus on policies and practices designed to protect health and safety, as well as policies and practices that may result in increased migration through particularly harsh terrain,” the letter said.

CBP officials have faced criticism for their practice of metering, or what they call “queue management,” that limits the number of people allowed to approach border crossings to seek asylum. The agency says its ports of entry have capacity limits and were not designed to process large volumes of migrant families requesting humanitarian assistance.

According to CBP records, the United States reported 281 deaths along the Mexico border during the government’s 2018 fiscal year, which ended in September. The tally includes bodies and remains found in the desert or along the banks of the Rio Grande.

The figure was down from 298 in 2017 and a peak of 471 in 2012.

Guatemalan nationals accounted for the largest share of border arrests last month, surpassing Mexicans for the first time, according to CBP data.

“It’s important to draw attention to the unfortunate reality that the places where migrants now enter are more dangerous and the distances they travel are greater, which exposes to greater dangers those who lack provisions like food and water,” said Tekandi Paniagua, Guatemala’s general consul in Del Rio, Tex.

The situation, Paniagua said, “is worsened in the case of children who are much more vulnerable to the kind of journey required to make these crossings into the United States.”

In May, a Guatemalan toddler died after her release from U.S. immigration custody after crossing the border illegally with her mother. The family is seeking at least $40 million in damages, alleging negligent medical care.
 
May 19, 2011
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There exists many unknowns in this case. For instance, there is no autopsy. The medical records have not been released. The cause of death cited includes sepsis which is severe infection. We don't know what if any underlying conditions she had. We don't know her condition at presentation. Perhaps she appeared as a sleeping child and family voiced no complaints. Perhaps she was medically evaluated initially and was in a much more stable state. Bacterial meningitis can take a mildly ill-appearing child to death in 8 hours for example. Anyone who does critical care work with children knows they compensate extremely well until they can't any longer and crash suddenly. We don't know what care was attempted at the center. It is reasonable that she could not take PO and would require an interosseous line to get fluids in her. She might have had what most people would think of good care and experienced refeeding syndrome hastening her decompensation. We don't know the validity of the reports that she hadn't eaten or drank in days. We don't know the medical acumen of the people who interacted with her at the facility or the treatment resources they had available. We don't know if, e.g., there was another medical emergency going on at the same time which occupied staff. Or appropriate staffing wasn't available due to a car accident, illness, no show, whatever. In other words while it is quite reasonable to suspect neglect or malice could be involved, we don't actually know shit.
Which would all provide a reasonable set of excuses for border control if they weren't interacting with a child known to have crossed a desert and presented as 'not having eaten or drunk in days' (which is CBP's own report, not from "some guy interviewed by press").

It's been many, many years since I attended a first aid course, but one thing I do remember is that you go to the non-responsive ones first. Logically you'd then move on to the most potentially vulnerable ones, a) she's a child and b) she would have been in a heck of a state. No-one competent would let a person who haven't eaten or drunk in days and has just crossed a desert just "sleep it off" without checking on them sufficiently. She should have been right up the list, and that must have been a terribly long list of worse medical emergencies to take 8 hours to get through to only bother seeking competent medical attention, it sounds like they should have called the nearest hospital for backup!

If the facility didn't have either the staff or the equipment to confidently deal with her case, then surely they ought to just refer it straight to the nearest hospital.

Personally I think what the CBP chose to report is rather telling. Hopefully more information will be released, but I rather doubt it.
 
May 19, 2011
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Reading the article that @Lanyap posted tells us very little worthy of note. Whether or not she had an underlying infection still does not excuse the 8 hours in their custody without medical attention, nor does the form signed by the father that they're using to cover their asses with. The only "signs of distress" they noted was her vomiting.

The CBP knew that she hadn't eaten or drunk for days and that she had crossed a desert, and that alone should have earned her some qualified medical attention, not some form-filling to absolve the CBP of paying attention to people in their care.
 

Viper1j

Golden Member
Jul 31, 2018
1,391
385
96

Viper1j

Golden Member
Jul 31, 2018
1,391
385
96
Latest article from WaPo with more details. Looks like CBP did everything they could under the circumstances. For those who keep saying she died from dehydration, you need to read the original article posted by the op. The hospital where she was treated indicated that septic shock was another factor so she had a serious infection that played a major role in her death.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/worl...6a6f3ce8199_story.html?utm_term=.2a4bda2e0c9a

Twenty-seven hours before she died at an El Paso children’s hospital, 7-year-old Jakelin Caal walked across the U.S. border with her father and 161 other migrants outside Antelope Wells, N.M.

It was 9:15 p.m. on Dec. 6, and the small, remote U.S. border crossing was closed for the night. There were four Border Patrol agents on duty, and no medical staff.

The migrants skirted barriers and crossed into the United States. Like most Central American asylum seekers who have been arriving at the border in record numbers, they were not seeking to evade capture but to turn themselves in.

That night, as elsewhere when large groups of parents with children appear at remote border outposts, U.S. agents strained to accommodate the needs of those in their custody. The agents radioed the nearest Border Patrol station in Lordsburg, 90 minutes away, to request a bus, the only one available along that barren desert span of the New Mexico boot heel.

What unfolded over the next eight hours, as Jakelin’s condition deteriorated but went unnoticed by agents and perhaps her father, is now the subject of an internal investigation at the Department of Homeland Security, and congressional Democrats are demanding a full accounting and meetings with Customs and Border Protection officials

On Tuesday, three days after the child’s death, CBP Commissioner Kevin McAleenan told the Senate Judiciary Committee that his agency’s Border Patrol stations and their rudimentary holding cells were ill-suited to handle so many families and children. More medical staff and social workers were needed to handle the demographic change, he said.

McAleenan did not mention the girl’s death, which was disclosed by CBP only after The Washington Post inquired about it Thursday evening. A DHS official said Friday the agency will review its policy on reporting deaths of migrants in U.S. custody.

Homeland Security officials have urged lawmakers to pass legislation addressing what they say are gaps in U.S. immigration and asylum laws that have induced more migrants to bring children in hopes of avoiding detention and deportation. Last month, more than 25,000 members of family groups crossed the border this way, the highest one-month total ever recorded.

Yet Jakelin’s death last week has put scrutiny on the surge — and the care of migrant families in U.S. custody — like no other recent event.

The girl’s father, Nery Caal, 29, remains in the El Paso area but has not spoken publicly. According to Guatemalan consular officials, the family is from the Alta Verapaz department, one of the country’s poorest, and the family’s primary language is Q’eqchi’, a pre-Columbian Mayan tongue.

Nery Caal has been granted a provisional release from CBP custody, according to consular officials, who said they are assisting with the repatriation of his daughter’s body.

This account of the events leading up to Jakelin’s death on Dec. 8 from dehydration, shock and liver failure is based on reports and interviews with consular officers as well as Homeland Security and Customs and Border Protection officials, who deny the agency is responsible for what happened.

White House and DHS officials Friday blamed the tragedy on the girl’s father and the smuggling organizations that send busloads of people across the border in numbers officials say are designed to overwhelm U.S. agents.

Before reaching the border that night, Jakelin Caal had nothing to eat or drink for days, according to CBP, citing statements from her father. But though the girl’s condition was worsening and her fever was soaring toward 106 degrees through the middle of the night, U.S. officials say her father did not tell agents.

“There were plenty of opportunities, if her father had noticed anything and brought it to agents’ attention,” said a CBP official who briefed reporters Friday, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

“There was no indication she had any health issues,” the official said.

According to an account of Jakelin’s death posted Friday on the Department of Homeland Security’s Facebook page, the agency said the girl showed no sign of distress during a basic, routine check after the group of 163 was taken into custody by three agents.

“The initial screening revealed no evidence of health issues. During the screening, the father denied that either he or his daughter were ill. This denial was recorded on Form I-779 signed by the father,” the DHS account said. The form was supplied in English, but CBP officials said agents provided a verbal translation.

“At this time, they were offered water and food and had access to restrooms,” DHS said.

It’s unclear whether Nery Caal attempted to feed his daughter or give her water during the middle of the night while the family waited with dozens of others in a loading bay next to the border crossing.

When the bus arrived from Lordsburg, border agents filled it with 50 children and other juveniles who had arrived with the group, following standard CBP procedures that require agents to prioritize children who arrive without an adult or guardian.

Jakelin and her father would have to wait longer.

It wasn’t until around 5 a.m. — nearly eight hours after they had crossed the border — that the bus returned to pick up a second load of passengers, which included the 7-year-old and her father.

At that time, Nery Caal told agents his daughter was sick, according to DHS, and agents called ahead to notify the station of her condition.

A few minutes into the 90-minute drive, the feverish child began vomiting. The bus continued on its route toward Lordsburg, which CBP officials said Friday was the fastest way for the girl to receive medical attention.

The bus arrived at the station shortly before 6:30 a.m. on Dec. 7. “At that point, the father notified agents that the child was not breathing,” the DHS account states. “Border Patrol EMTs began medical care and requested an ambulance.

By then the girl’s fever was 105.9 degrees. “Agents providing medical care revived the child twice,” according to DHS.

The nearest major pediatric hospital, in El Paso, was a four-hour drive away. Agents ordered a helicopter evacuation, and at 8:51 a.m. on Dec. 7, Jakelin arrived at Providence Children’s Hospital. Border Patrol agents drove her father separately.

Jakelin died 15 hours later in the hospital’s intensive care unit, according to DHS and consular officials. Her father was present.

Asked by a reporter Friday whether the administration is “taking any responsibility for the girl’s death,” White House spokesman Hogan Gidley said: “Does the administration take responsibility for a parent taking a child on a trek through Mexico to get to this country? No.”

“If we could just come together and pass some common-sense laws to disincentivize people from coming up from the border and encourage them to do it the right way, the legal way, then those types of deaths, those types of assaults, those types of rapes, the child smuggling, the human trafficking, that would all come to an end,” Gidley said. “And we hope Democrats join the president.”

Senior Democratic lawmakers, including members who will soon chair the House Judiciary and Homeland Security committees, sent a letter Friday to the DHS inspector general urging an investigation, citing “the seriousness of this tragedy and the many questions that remain.”

“The investigation should focus on policies and practices designed to protect health and safety, as well as policies and practices that may result in increased migration through particularly harsh terrain,” the letter said.

CBP officials have faced criticism for their practice of metering, or what they call “queue management,” that limits the number of people allowed to approach border crossings to seek asylum. The agency says its ports of entry have capacity limits and were not designed to process large volumes of migrant families requesting humanitarian assistance.

According to CBP records, the United States reported 281 deaths along the Mexico border during the government’s 2018 fiscal year, which ended in September. The tally includes bodies and remains found in the desert or along the banks of the Rio Grande.

The figure was down from 298 in 2017 and a peak of 471 in 2012.

Guatemalan nationals accounted for the largest share of border arrests last month, surpassing Mexicans for the first time, according to CBP data.

“It’s important to draw attention to the unfortunate reality that the places where migrants now enter are more dangerous and the distances they travel are greater, which exposes to greater dangers those who lack provisions like food and water,” said Tekandi Paniagua, Guatemala’s general consul in Del Rio, Tex.

The situation, Paniagua said, “is worsened in the case of children who are much more vulnerable to the kind of journey required to make these crossings into the United States.”

In May, a Guatemalan toddler died after her release from U.S. immigration custody after crossing the border illegally with her mother. The family is seeking at least $40 million in damages, alleging negligent medical care.
If I give you a form, written in Cantonese, and I explain it to you in English, stating that I'm going to give your child a routine medical checkup, when in fact the words on the form, again written in Cantonese, state that you are authorizing me to perform a frontal lobotomy on your child.

You cool with that?
 
Jan 12, 2005
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Of course. But at this point we do not know the sequence of events after they were placed into custody or what was done or not done.

All we do know is that the father took his young daughter into the desert with no food or water.
Do you also agree that the actions of the parent before the child was detained do not change the duty of care for the authorities after the child has been detained?
 
Jan 12, 2005
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what ever is in place is pretty close to my solution, when a issue presented itself care was given immediately.
How do you know this? You dont wait until someone is in a critical condition before you start treating them.

No you can not save everyone always, No you can not diagnose every problem before it happens.
But dehydration would be the first thing you would adress when you seize a 7 year old in the desert!


If there is a outbreak of a deadly disease downtown new york how many people will die because overcrowded ER rooms? Its impossible to prevent things from happening and giving the intensive care you think is needed at all times and places. Maybe there should be a helicopter of DR's that circles the border and lands as needed? but seriously this is budget restricted process who is going to fund this? you dont even pay taxes in USA but you want to tell us what we should do. Endless $$$ would solve many problems, hell even unemployment would be zero with all the people needed to care for every possible situation.
Why are you disappearing up your own arse in hypotheticals when theres a very specific case to discuss?
 
Jun 12, 2005
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Do you also agree that the actions of the parent before the child was detained do not change the duty of care for the authorities after the child has been detained?

I do agree that what happened didn't remove the duty of care. From the article posted by Lanyap they met their obligations to the best of their ability considering the information and resources they had. The station was closed for the night, there were only 4 officers to take custody of 163 people. They called for the bus that was 90 minutes away. The father stated that they were fine. They offered food and water.

CBP people are not murderers or monsters, they are men and women with children of their own. I do not believe for an instant that they stood by and watched a child die. The station was closed and had no medical staff present and only 4 officers.

Why do you believe these 4 officers stood by and watched a child die?

Do you agree that the child would probably not have been in this condition had the father not taken her into the desert with no food or water?
 
Aug 21, 2003
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CBP people are not murderers or monsters, they are men and women with children of their own. I do not believe for an instant that they stood by and watched a child die. The station was closed and had no medical staff present and only 4 officers.

Why do you believe these 4 officers stood by and watched a child die?
CBP has long been a troubled agency under probably all administrations since its creation in the early oughts. A lack of real oversight has effectively created a rouge agency that is mostly accountable to nobody. This will happen to any police force left to its own devices and I can't imaging having an administration that actually would approve implicitly (and explicitly in many cases) of harsh treatment of migrants is going to improve that any.

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news...ttern-of-border-agent-violence-across-america

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news...after-agent-charged-texas-murders/1378474002/

https://thehill.com/blogs/congress-...nfirmed-cbp-chief-must-tackle-agencys-culture


In general this country has a pretty amazing disregard for the wellbeing of people who, for whatever reason, fall into the care or custody of the government. It's no picnic for citizens either who get tossed into the criminal justice system unless they have substantial financial resources at their disposal.
 
Jan 12, 2005
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Why do you believe these 4 officers stood by and watched a child die?
At no point have I said that.

Do you agree that the child would probably not have been in this condition had the father not taken her into the desert with no food or water?
I agree, but that is irrelevant to the care that the child recieved in custody.
 
Jun 12, 2005
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No but compared to losing them to the gangs, one might choose fleeing.

They were in Mexico and were already away from the gangs they were allegedly running from in their home country.
 

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