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670 gtx for dell xps 410

pnorris

Member
Jun 11, 2012
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I need help with what will happen if I put a 670 GTX in my 6 year old Dell XPS 410.

I am planning on building a new computer in October, but I my 8800 GTS 512 isn't going to make it that long, and I don't want to buy a replacement card that I'm not going to want in 4-5 months. So,

the 670 potentially could kill my dell with the 375 watt psu, but maybe you know better.

The computer has an E6600, and the only game I will be playing is NWN2 with V-Sync on.

I'm thinking that the processor will limit the gpu so much that it will not matter that the psu isn't adequate. And, it only has to last until November at the latest.

Also, please let me know if I'm wrong in thinking that I would not have any problems running a PCIE 3.0 card in PCIE 1.0.

Thanks.
 

ShintaiDK

Lifer
Apr 22, 2012
20,378
134
106
Basicly get the PSU specs. How much power on the 12V rail and if more, how many rails.

375W is plenty to power a regular GTX670+E6600. But again, your PSU might be dimensioned to something else. And note, the GTX670 requires 2x6pin connectors.
 

pnorris

Member
Jun 11, 2012
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Thanks for the fast reply, ShintaiDK. I'm so glad to hear that you don't think there will be a problem.

I have the 2x6pin connectors--thanks for the heads-up though.
 

The_Golden_Man

Senior member
Apr 7, 2012
816
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According to J.J from Asus, a GTX 670 will draw about 140 Watts ~ in the most demanding games. So it's real nice to the PSU.

However, even if the psu is rated at 375w, what really counts is how much it can deliver on the + 12 Volt rail/rails. I would at least have + 30 Ampere for the 12 Volt rail/rails for a GTX 670.
 

pnorris

Member
Jun 11, 2012
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I just don't know a thing about amperage or rails.

Can I deduce this from knowing that the 8800 GTX (G80, with 2 6pin connectors) was an option when purchasing new from Dell?
 

ShintaiDK

Lifer
Apr 22, 2012
20,378
134
106
Thats why you need to find out. Your 375W PSU can only handle a GTX670 if it supplies enough power on the 12V Rail. And if multiple 12V rails its gets even more complicated.

The 8800GTX had a 155W TDP. The GTX 670 180W I think it is. So I would say you are most likely safe. Unless Dell would actually supply you with a different PSU if the 8800GTX was selected.

Does it have the 2 6pin PCIe power connectors? If yes. Then go for it. the only thing you can ruin is basicly the PSU.
 

digitaldurandal

Golden Member
Dec 3, 2009
1,828
0
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You could potentially ruin everything actually. Most of the off the shelf computers are made with a cheap PSU and motherboard. I would think twice about putting a 670 in there without upgrading the PSU also. If you plan on spending 400 dollars on a graphics card - protect your investment and get a 50 - 60 dollar trustable PSU to go with it.
 

toyota

Lifer
Apr 15, 2001
12,957
1
0
According to J.J from Asus, a GTX 670 will draw about 140 Watts ~ in the most demanding games. So it's real nice to the PSU.

However, even if the psu is rated at 375w, what really counts is how much it can deliver on the + 12 Volt rail/rails. I would at least have + 30 Ampere for the 12 Volt rail/rails for a GTX 670.
it can certainly use a little more power than 140 watts at times. a stock reference 670 was pulling just over 150 watts in Crysis 2 according to techpowerup. the power supply should easily handle it in theory but after 6 years is that oem psu really up to snuff?

I would just grab a 7850 since that uses about 50 watts less power. with an E6600, you will never see the difference between it and a 670 anyway. even the 7850 will be massively held back in the majority of games. then when you build your pc in the fall just oc the 7850 a bit and you will still have a nice card. heck the resolution was not even mentioned here so you could even be below 1920x1080 for all we know.
 

nenforcer

Golden Member
Aug 26, 2008
1,767
1
76
You could potentially ruin everything actually. Most of the off the shelf computers are made with a cheap PSU and motherboard. I would think twice about putting a 670 in there without upgrading the PSU also. If you plan on spending 400 dollars on a graphics card - protect your investment and get a 50 - 60 dollar trustable PSU to go with it.
^^^^^^ This all the way right here.

Don't buy a $400 video card, either AMD or nVidia, without consider purchasing a decent / newer power supply.

You don't want the hassle of stressing that old system to the breaking point possibly causing either a failure of the motherboard, power supply, graphics card or worst of all, all three.

More than likely that OEM power supply has multiple +12V rails and it will tell you on the label if you can decipher it. You can certainly try plugging in the new video card and if you were running a GTX 8800GT before, it should work fine. If you say you are only going to use it until November then maybe you can get by with only light gaming until you get the new system. I wouldn't buy that new card and fire up a multiplayer game of Battlefield 3 for a 12hour marathon, however.

You can find a single rail PC Power and Cooling Dell OEM replacement 410W PS on eBay for around $30 or less.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/PC-Power-Cooling-Silencer-410-ATX-410W-Power-Supply-/221043863176?pt=PCA_UPS&hash=item33773dae88
 
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pnorris

Member
Jun 11, 2012
25
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Wow. Lots to think about.

My monitor is a 1920x1200 Dell.

I game for 2-3 hours at a time, here and there. Right now I'm only interested in playing NWN2. My belief is that NWN has fewer issues with nvidia so I'm sticking with green.

What I was hoping to have confirmed is:

with vsync on & the game most definitely being limited by the psu that the gpu would never come close to being stressed and in effect use less power than say a 550 ti.

Any possibility that I'm right?
 

The_Golden_Man

Senior member
Apr 7, 2012
816
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0
it can certainly use a little more power than 140 watts at times. a stock reference 670 was pulling just over 150 watts in Crysis 2 according to techpowerup. the power supply should easily handle it in theory but after 6 years is that oem psu really up to snuff?

I would just grab a 7850 since that uses about 50 watts less power. with an E6600, you will never see the difference between it and a 670 anyway. even the 7850 will be massively held back in the majority of games. then when you build your pc in the fall just oc the 7850 a bit and you will still have a nice card. heck the resolution was not even mentioned here so you could even be below 1920x1080 for all we know.
Yes, I think TDP is 170 Watts.. And if using programs like Furmark, Heaven Benchmark and OCCT GPU test it will probably draw near/over TDP. What I meant when quoting J.J from ASUS and his statement for the card drawing around 140 Watts ~, was for most regular gaming. A normal user will not draw much more power than this from the card in general.

Anyway, if using a somewhat weak powersupply, I would advice against running programs like Furmark or OCCT GPU test. Even users with stronger PSU's should take it easy with these programs. They are overkill. And it's actually better to using a demanding game or something for checking stability when overclocking. I've used both Furmark and OCCT myself, but as I've said, would recommend people to take it easy with these programs.
 
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pnorris

Member
Jun 11, 2012
25
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Thanks guys for helping me think about this.

I'm going with the 670 and a SeaSonic 560 gold.
 

WiseUp216

Platinum Member
Mar 12, 2012
2,251
50
101
I would check around the innerweb and see if anyone else has used a 600 series card in that Dell.

I had an XPS 8300 that would not POST with a 670. The issue has been known by Dell for 2 months and they have no plan to update the bios.

Don't know about your 410, though.
 

nenforcer

Golden Member
Aug 26, 2008
1,767
1
76
Let us know how it works. Only thing I don't like is that

PCI-E 1.0 x16 = PCI-E 2.0 x8 = PCI-E 3.0 x4

So your really crippling the potential of that card in terms of bandwidth in that old system.
 

pnorris

Member
Jun 11, 2012
25
0
0
Let us know how it works. Only thing I don't like is that

PCI-E 1.0 x16 = PCI-E 2.0 x8 = PCI-E 3.0 x4

So your really crippling the potential of that card in terms of bandwidth in that old system.

I'll let you know how it works out--I'm curious about it too. If it can get me to October, I'll shed the rest of the system and build a new computer with the gpu and psu.
 

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