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64 GB committed charge in windows 10 Pro?

DeadlyTitan

Member
Oct 20, 2017
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So i built a new system with 32 GB ram (2x16) and installed Windows 10 pro on a 250 GB Samsung 850 Evo SSD and when i checked my task manager i see committed charge a bit too high (64 GB), so the question is, should i let it be? i left my page file as system managed cause well am not bothered by it and with 32 GB it'll never use much of the page file. I am also not actually concerned about the space on my SSD, by that i mean i am not going to install any games and software on that drive, as they will be on separate ssd's, so basically this entire 250 GB is just for OS and nothing more. The reason i ask this question is cause my C drive tends to go bigger over time cause of save games (lots and lots of save games like skyrim alone can take up anywhere from 20 GB to 50 GB), documents, installing mods for games and some log files which is why i left 250 GB for the system drive. So will i be space starved if i leave it at 64 GB ? Also i dunno how to reduce the side of committed charge without reducing page file
 
Last edited:

pandemonium

Golden Member
Mar 17, 2011
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It's been my experience that the paging file for end-user machines doesn't need more than a few GBs as long as you have a decent amount of RAM. I also have 32GB of ram and had it set to 128KB minimum and 1024MB maximum and it ran perfectly fine (for everyday use; gaming, browsing, playback, editing). However, if you're not worried about space, I'd probably set a minimum of 256KB and maximum of 16GB. I just can't fathom any reason to need more than that with having 32GB of RAM. Unless you're working with software that specifically needs a large paging file, you don't need much reserve for the paging file. It's just a waste of resources and reads/writes to your drive IMHO.

I'm sure others will have varying advice, but that's my 2¢. Virtual memory allocation, for as long as it's been around, still seems to be a subject matter of high contention. Most people don't bother tweaking it and just let Windows take the wheel.

Commit charge is essentially windows paging file + physical RAM available, IIRC, so reducing the paging file will reduce the total available commit charge, as you said.
 
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DeadlyTitan

Member
Oct 20, 2017
144
11
41
It's been my experience that the paging file for end-user machines doesn't need more than a few GBs as long as you have a decent amount of RAM. I also have 32GB of ram and had it set to 128KB minimum and 1024MB maximum and it ran perfectly fine (for everyday use; gaming, browsing, playback, editing). However, if you're not worried about space, I'd probably set a minimum of 256KB and maximum of 16GB. I just can't fathom any reason to need more than that with having 32GB of RAM. Unless you're working with software that specifically needs a large paging file, you don't need much reserve for the paging file. It's just a waste of resources and reads/writes to your drive IMHO.

I'm sure others will have varying advice, but that's my 2¢. Virtual memory allocation, for as long as it's been around, still seems to be a subject matter of high contention. Most people don't bother tweaking it and just let Windows take the wheel.

Commit charge is essentially windows paging file + physical RAM available, IIRC, so reducing the paging file will reduce the total available commit charge, as you said.

Okay, reduced it to 4 GB Max. Yes i am not concerned about the space causei am not going to install anything else on that one, i got other drives, but i do like to keep the drive a little clutter free.
 

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