4K at 60Hz - Help me sort this out

Mischichi

Junior Member
Oct 13, 2013
9
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#1
Before we start. English is not my native language so have patience with me :)

I just bought a new TV and it ended up with a LG 65UF860V which seems nice in the mid-range class. My goal was to find a new TV with good panel quality and did not even pay attention to the 4K stamp.

Anyway. Due to my curiosity and since i want to learn something new i started to google which specs a computer need to play 4K to a big monitor at 60Hz, and immediately i stumble upon native HDMI 2.0. And correct me if i'm wrong, but the only GPU's that has native HDMI 2.0 is Nvidia GTX 9xx?

Also noticed a article about Club 3D is releasing a adapter for any GPU to run at HDMI 2.0

And at last i got into the reading about RGB 4:4:4/4:2:0
What is this, and what do a TV/monitor need to run 4K at 60Hz?
I can't remember any manufacturer ever typed these specs on their website or manual.
 

TestKing123

Senior member
Sep 9, 2007
200
6
81
#2
As far as I know, only Nvidia's GTX 9 series has HDMI 2.0 support. So if you want to game in 4k 60 fps, Nvidia is the only way to get there (for now). You'll more than likely need SLI to get close to 60fps anyways, so if you're single card you might want to see if your 4k TV scales well with 1440p (my LG TV scales 1440p pretty good, looks better than 1080p, so I can use that for games when SLI is broken or performance in 4k just isn't up to snuff).

There's alot of displayport to HDMI 2.0 converters announced, but so far none have been released to consumers. So they cannot be purchased at this time.

4:4:4 is full RGB color support. Needs to be enabled on your HDMI port/TV and video card/Windows.
 

Mischichi

Junior Member
Oct 13, 2013
9
0
0
#3
Thanks for the reply TestKing123. You just saved my alot of reading from the web :)
Which graphic card is required to play a movie in 4K? Is a GTX 960 enough?
also
How do i enable full RGB color support on Windows?

What i did notice on my LG 65UF860V is that 720p movies looks crap time to time. Especially at transitions from black to bright colors. Doesn't happens at 1080p movies.
I'm using MPC-HC+LAV+madVR
 

TestKing123

Senior member
Sep 9, 2007
200
6
81
#4
What graphics card do you have?

For Nvidia, go to Nvidia Control Panel, Display setup, and choose Y:4:4:4 output (or something that looks like that)
 

BarkingGhostar

Diamond Member
Nov 20, 2009
5,747
81
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#5
I'd be curious to know if this unit can even take a 60p (non-interlaced) signal at 4K. I tried to find maximum input resolution/frequency from the owner's manual on the LG website, but that manual is a joke.

BTW, how good is your vision and how close will you be sitting to it to benefit from feeding and displaying 4K content?
 
Feb 21, 2007
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#6
That's interesting because everything I was reading about resolution is that the AMD cards do better at higher scaling than Nvidia. But then again I wasn't looking at 4k only.
 

Mischichi

Junior Member
Oct 13, 2013
9
0
0
#7
What graphics card do you have?

For Nvidia, go to Nvidia Control Panel, Display setup, and choose Y:4:4:4 output (or something that looks like that)
Again, thanks :)
Found something that's called YCbCr 444 and i guess that's the one i should choose over RGB?
For now i'm running my HTPC with a GT 520 card, but a new HTPC is on the way with a GTX 960 justy because my kid want to play some games on that big screen :)
 

Mischichi

Junior Member
Oct 13, 2013
9
0
0
#8
Don't know if this is the right place to question this, but i give it a try.
Let's say you play 4K content from a HTPC over HDMI, sending the signal to a reciever, and from reciever to TV/monitor. What happens if the reciever doesn't have 4K support?

I mean, what does the reciever do with that signal? Nothing? Is it just a bridge, or does it convert the signal somehow?

I have a Pioneer SC-2022-K reciever, and the manual says
*HDCP signals 1080p/24, 1080p/60 etc.
*3D signals
*Deep color signals
*x.v color signals
*ARC
etc etc. But it doesn't say anything about 4K

Should i send the 4K signals directly from HTPC to TV instead?
 

BarkingGhostar

Diamond Member
Nov 20, 2009
5,747
81
126
#10
I'd be curious to see if the TV actually takes that signal.
 

TestKing123

Senior member
Sep 9, 2007
200
6
81
#11
Your receiver will be recognized as a 1080p device, not 4k, so you will not be able to set a 4k resolution.

Basically you're in the same boat I'm in. Connect your card directly to your 4k TV for 4k resolutions, and a second output (HDMI, optical, or analague) to the receiver for audio.
 

Mischichi

Junior Member
Oct 13, 2013
9
0
0
#12
Thanks :)
And what should i do with the sound? Just run a Coax from HTPC to receiver, or from TV to receiver, or HDMI from ARC to receiver?


I'd be curious to see if the TV actually takes that signal.
I'll be back wit a answer later :)


Your receiver will be recognized as a 1080p device, not 4k, so you will not be able to set a 4k resolution.

Basically you're in the same boat I'm in. Connect your card directly to your 4k TV for 4k resolutions, and a second output (HDMI, optical, or analague) to the receiver for audio.
Thanks. You just posted before my second question :)
Just realised that NAD are shipping out HDMI 2.0 upgrade for free for their customers. Just to bad i don't own a NAD :D
 
Last edited:
Nov 20, 2005
14,612
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#13
Thanks :)
And what should i do with the sound?
Depends on how nice your setup is.

Did you spend $1000+ on the speakers? Do you need HD audio from Blu Ray rips? If so I would look into a HDMI splitter.

If not, optical from HTPC is fine.

Whatever you do, don't run anything from the TV. Most TVs output 2.0.
 

Mischichi

Junior Member
Oct 13, 2013
9
0
0
#14
Depends on how nice your setup is.

Did you spend $1000+ on the speakers? Do you need HD audio from Blu Ray rips? If so I would look into a HDMI splitter.

If not, optical from HTPC is fine.

Whatever you do, don't run anything from the TV. Most TVs output 2.0.
With the two subwoofer i would say around $1500.
Movies to 90% and the rest goes to music :)

My TV has both Coax and HDMI out, but yeah, it would be closer to just run a cable from the HTPC och from a splitter. Thanks again.
 

Mischichi

Junior Member
Oct 13, 2013
9
0
0
#16
Hmm here's a new question.
Regarding the specs this TV are rated to 3840x2160, but i'm also able to choose 4096x2160. And i can't notice any different in the picture quality, except higher resolution :)
How is that even possible? This is my first 4K monitor/TV, but i have never been able to select higher resolution on my 1080p/1440p monitors
 

TestKing123

Senior member
Sep 9, 2007
200
6
81
#17
Always choose 3840x2160, since that is native resolution for UHD TV's. 4096 comes up as an option but it's not a native resolution, and will result in a slightly more blurrier picture (and an enormous performance cost for just an extra 200 pixels that ends up looking worse).
 

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