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Question 4DS memory ReRam: real deal or doomed to fail?

Unicorn Hunter

Junior Member
Nov 20, 2019
3
0
11
Hi all,
There is an Australian company, headquartered in silicon valley, who work with imec in Belgium, called 4DS memory.
They are developing a non filamentary ReRam.

Does anyone know this company and whether the product is viable?
Or is it just another R&D project that never hits the shelf?

Thankyou in advance.
 

Unicorn Hunter

Junior Member
Nov 20, 2019
3
0
11
Guessing no one has any details or knowledge on this company and their purported holy grail storage class memory solution in development...

Bother.
 

IntelUser2000

Elite Member
Oct 14, 2003
7,092
1,622
136
Guessing no one has any details or knowledge on this company and their purported holy grail storage class memory solution in development...

Bother.
Simple searching using google shows the company being available as publicly traded as far back as in 2011. And back then each share was worth 60 Australian cents.

Now its at 6.2 cents. So I would treat it the same way as I would with any penny stocks. They may have value, but its questionable. Reputable markets like Nasdaq requires the share value to be $1 for few months or the company gets delisted. Being on Nasdaq opens the company up for lots more funding opportunities and delisting does the opposite of that. It's not glamorous at all.

It's possible that they might still have a viable product, but its extremely difficult to compete against DRAM/NAND. NAND Flash took 20 years to reach people en masse and one analyst stated it was actually more expensive than DRAM until the volume difference came to be within 10x.

Even Optane with all the Intel backing is going to struggle to take hold. Getting it to be viable commercially requires price to be competitive and that in turn requires volume to be high.

DRAM, purely because of the momentum it has with number of units sold, means vast majority of the R&D focus is there. It killed a lot of "DRAM killers" because its massive momentum and volume meant its steady advances and volume pricing passed alternatives. NAND Flash is starting to be like that for storage.

Anything that tries to fit between the two is going to have a mighty difficult time.
 

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