3770k delid + tests on stock heatsink (with photos!)

Discussion in 'CPUs and Overclocking' started by lehtv, Aug 26, 2015.

  1. lehtv

    lehtv Elite Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Messages:
    11,873
    Likes Received:
    70
    My 3770K has always been a bit of a hot head, especially now that I've resorted to using Intel's stock cooler. What's more, its warranty just expired... So there's only one way forward: crack it open and put some metal on!

    Equipped with Coollaboratory Liquid Pro and a vice, I was eager to continue. Problem was, the vice was rusted, made worse by the fact that my dad crafted it way back when in school. For now, I had to leave the CPU sweating in its socket.


    1. Refurbishing the vice

    To melt off the rust, I soaked the vice in a vinegar salt solution for about 40 hours. The bulk of the rust dissolved, but there was still some rust visible after scrubbing with steel wool. At least the old industrial green paint came off easy. One part of the tool just removed from the vinegar bath:

    [​IMG]

    Now painted black (with paint compatible with rusted surfaces):

    [​IMG]

    What a beauty. Now, to the matter at hand.


    2. Delidding

    The CPU, its old paste wiped off with IPA and secured between the jaws of the vice (which were covered with sticky tape):

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The head came off easily when adding pressure constantly and slowly. The stock paste was very tough and in some parts dried, but IPA did its trick. Most of the glue I scraped off with an IKEA family card.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    3. Applying Liquid Pro

    A droplet of liquid metal on the die (probably slightly too much, but no matter). Spreading it was easy with the supplied Q-tip.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    First the CPU back in the socket, then the lid back on (about 5 mm offset towards the base of the locking mechanism).

    [​IMG]


    4. Test bed and method

    My "test bench" was assembled on nothing more than the motherboard's cardboard box. In a well ventilated case, cooling would be much better. Ambient temperature was about 24°C or 75 F during testing.

    [​IMG]

    The essential specs -
    CPU: i7-3770K, Vcore offset -0.045 V
    Cooler: Intel stock with Arctic MX-4
    Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V

    Fan RPM during idle was 1000, during load it was 2000. These are the stock fan's minimum and maximum, respectively. At minimum RPM, the cooler is whisper quiet, while at maximum it's not terribly noisy but annoying if continuous.

    Idle temperature was measured after 10 minutes of waiting, and the reported figure is the average of minimum core temperatures. Load was achieved with 10 minutes of Prime95 SmallFFT, on two settings: stock 3.7GHz turbo, and 3.9GHz (stock single core turbo forced an all four cores). The reported figure is the average of maximum core temperatures.


    5. Temperatures

    This is the part you came here to read, am I right? ;)

    Code:
    Setting ... °C before ... °C after delid
    Idle ...... 40.25 ....... 36.5
    3.7 GHz ... 81.5 ........ 71.5
    3.9 GHz ... 93.75 ....... 80.5
    
    More than 13 °C improvement at 3.9GHz! A clock speed that previously was too hot for 24/7 use, was now fine. I didn't quite expect such results with only the stock cooler - I have to admit, I'm very pleased. A massive difference with just a 10 euro investment and a bit of manual work.

    (Original screen caps combined from HWInfo64.)

    Thanks for reading! :)
     
    #1 lehtv, Aug 26, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2015
  2. Loading...

    Similar Threads - 3770k delid tests Forum Date
    £60 upgrade to 3770k? CPUs and Overclocking May 6, 2017
    air cooled 3770k 4.6 fully stable.worth delid? CPUs and Overclocking Jun 8, 2013
    Delided, laped 3770K, temp drop 30+, thanks Idont and Ido CARE CPUs and Overclocking Mar 11, 2013
    Bare-die testing: A delidded 3770k, an H100, and 9 different TIMs CPUs and Overclocking Nov 26, 2012
    Delidded my i7-3770K, loaded temperatures drop by 20°C at 4.7GHz CPUs and Overclocking Aug 3, 2012

  3. Burpo

    Burpo Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2013
    Messages:
    3,826
    Likes Received:
    175
    Informative & nicely done. Thank you :)
     
  4. Smoblikat

    Smoblikat Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2011
    Messages:
    5,048
    Likes Received:
    73
    Nice writeup. I used a razor blade to delid my 3770K and I wound up scratching off a little bit of the green on the edge of the CPU. My load temps at 4.5ghz (stock volts) on an H70 dropped by about 24C.
     
  5. lehtv

    lehtv Elite Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Messages:
    11,873
    Likes Received:
    70
    Whoa, nice. You must've had particularly badly applied stock paste. D:
     
  6. TeknoBug

    TeknoBug Platinum Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2013
    Messages:
    2,028
    Likes Received:
    18
    Wow was the Malay CPU that bad? I had the Costa Rica i7 3770K and never had heat problems, how are you getting it to 93C? With just a Hyper 212 at 4.5GHz (stock voltage) idle was still 28-32C and load was 55-60C. I normally ran it at 4.2Ghz with a -0.115v offset, yes undervolting while overclocking, it was a beautiful silicon lottery.
     
    #5 TeknoBug, Aug 26, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2015
  7. BonzaiDuck

    BonzaiDuck Lifer

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Messages:
    12,583
    Likes Received:
    265
    I think the temperature improvements with delidding and CLU are consistent with what IDontCare and others posted with older delidding threads.

    Using CLU for a soldered chip or without delidding between the HSF and IHS is probably only good for a few C degrees.

    I was especially interested in your method using the clamp. that's a heck-a-lot easier than fiddling with a razor-blade . . .
     
  8. Ken g6

    Ken g6 Programming Moderator, Elite Member
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 1999
    Messages:
    12,969
    Likes Received:
    436
    Hey, that's a nice vice method! The methods I'd seen involved using the vice just on the IHS, and then whacking the PCB with a hammer! :eek: This looks a lot safer. :cool:
     
  9. Yuriman

    Yuriman Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2004
    Messages:
    5,092
    Likes Received:
    55
    Looks great!

    I dug through IDC's delidding thread for some of my old numbers for my 3570K:



    Here are my long-term results of using CLU:

    http://forums.anandtech.com/showthread.php?t=2362347&highlight=clu


    Recently I played with voltages a bit, to see how low I could get them with a 4.0ghz OC:

    http://forums.anandtech.com/showthread.php?t=2443083&highlight=
     
    #8 Yuriman, Aug 26, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2015
  10. know of fence

    know of fence Senior member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2009
    Messages:
    555
    Likes Received:
    2
    I always wondered about lapping, if you have it polished like an antique mirror, wouldn't that also reflect some of the IR radiation (radiated heat) back on the CPU. Or maybe distances and flatness are just more important.
     
  11. lehtv

    lehtv Elite Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Messages:
    11,873
    Likes Received:
    70
    I remember's IDC's delid & lapping thread, but don't remember reading your post before. Very interesting stuff. What a massive difference between Phobya HeGrease and CLU when applied directly on die. I've read of some attempts using NT-H1 and the results have been almost as good as with Liquid Pro, as in 10+ C better than Intel's stock paste :eek:

    I really hope I don't run into that crystallization effect you had with CLU, although reapplying Liquid Pro shouldn't be much of a hassle as there's no need to completely remove the previous CLU before applying another 'layer'. Here's what CLP should look like after a year of aging:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5tQx1LYDKsk

    It's a little clumped and crystallized, but very easy to clean
     
  12. Idontcare

    Idontcare Elite Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 1999
    Messages:
    21,130
    Likes Received:
    9
    The primary thermal conductivity pathway between the CPU silicon and the copper IHS is conductive, not radiative.
     
  13. PhIlLy ChEeSe

    PhIlLy ChEeSe Senior member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2013
    Messages:
    962
    Likes Received:
    0
    Nice work, I have a 3770K, I may pop the lid on. It's been under water is why I haven't thought about it yet.
     
  14. Yuriman

    Yuriman Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2004
    Messages:
    5,092
    Likes Received:
    55
    Yeah, I like his method. It's probably applicable to Skylake owners, too, since they won't have any surface bits under the IHS.
     
  15. MongGrel

    MongGrel Lifer

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2013
    Messages:
    38,755
    Likes Received:
    3,047
    Bravo, you went there.

    Have always known about that but never have tried it myself.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. PhIlLy ChEeSe

    PhIlLy ChEeSe Senior member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2013
    Messages:
    962
    Likes Received:
    0
    LOL!

    @Lehtv
    Your pretty ballsy to pop it in the vise and crank on it, IMHO I'd be scared it would let go and boom no more CPU.
     
  17. lehtv

    lehtv Elite Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Messages:
    11,873
    Likes Received:
    70
    Heh thanks PhIlLy. Where's the fun without a little bit of risk ^^
     
  18. RampantAndroid

    RampantAndroid Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2004
    Messages:
    6,591
    Likes Received:
    2
    Hmm....how hard was it though? As in, did the CPU come flying off, or did it slowly give and you could just do the rest by hand? How hard did you really have to crank the vise? Would dropping some IPA around the edges of the IHS to try and soften the glue help any?

    Neither shoving a razor into my CPU not hitting it with a hammer are really what I want to do to my 3770k...but I can see slow and steady force being a little safer and easier to control.
     
  19. lehtv

    lehtv Elite Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Messages:
    11,873
    Likes Received:
    70
    Not hard at all. First you just firmly secure the CPU in the vice. As soon as you start cranking it beyond what's necessary to keep it in place, the lid has no choice but to give in. It's best to go slow so that the glue has time to let go sort of on its own.

    What actually happened was the lid shifted a few millimeters while still attached to the PCB, and still secured between the jaws. At that point the vice had done its job and it was easy to just loosen it, then grab the chip and lift the lid with fingers.

    edit: now that i think of it I realize I should've recorded it :hmm:
     
    #18 lehtv, Aug 27, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2015
  20. know of fence

    know of fence Senior member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2009
    Messages:
    555
    Likes Received:
    2
    I imagine this is a point of some contention, as the original "vice method" as seen on Youtube involved giving a hard knock to the PCB with a rubber hammer, with just the IHS secured inside the vice, which sent the delidded CPU flying through the air.

    When I saw this Skylake delid fail, I thought of the slow vice method.

    [​IMG]
    http://www.anandtech.com/show/9505/skylake-cpu-package-analysis
     
  21. DrMrLordX

    DrMrLordX Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2000
    Messages:
    8,841
    Likes Received:
    842
    Ooof. Better get out your razors for Skylake. If you dare!!!!
     
  22. lehtv

    lehtv Elite Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Messages:
    11,873
    Likes Received:
    70
    Who dared give this thread 1/5 stars! :mad:
     
  23. PhIlLy ChEeSe

    PhIlLy ChEeSe Senior member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2013
    Messages:
    962
    Likes Received:
    0

    True True!
    Again still flat out Ballsy IMHO! Nice work!:thumbsup:
     
  24. know of fence

    know of fence Senior member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2009
    Messages:
    555
    Likes Received:
    2
    So I have to ask, how long did the CPU run before the temperature readings were taken?
    People like to talk about running stability tests for 24 hours, but rarely about temps. Now Realtemp or HWiNFO64 will record the time the program has been running recording Tmax. In my experience the longer the program was run the higher Tmax got eventually, for statistical reasons as well as heat buildup perhaps.
    Has anyone bothered to determine the time it takes for Tmax to not increase any more, it could be hours.
    Anyway I wouldn't mind if both temperatures were determined after 5 min of stress testing as long as there is consistency. But I think the temptation is high to fudge temperatures. I assume people talk about Tmax of highest core taken after the same period of time, when saying the temps were this and that, and of course similar conditions ambient temperature, humidity and pressure, but I can only guess.
     
  25. lehtv

    lehtv Elite Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2010
    Messages:
    11,873
    Likes Received:
    70
    10 minutes of Prime95 SmallFFT. That's version 28.5, I should clarify. Earlier versions stress the CPU a bit less.

    IME it stabilizes pretty fast as long as your case cooling is up to par. If heat keeps rising after a long period of load, there's not enough exhaust airflow.
     
  26. Piano Man

    Piano Man Diamond Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2000
    Messages:
    3,370
    Likes Received:
    0
    Awesome job. I'm assuming you rubbed off the glue on the back of the IHS as well?

    I'm about to try this on my i7-3770K. I've had it for awhile, but this hot summer has made me reduce my overclock, which was never that great to begin with (no A/C).

    I remember Idontcare's original thread, and thought "no way in hell", but I think I'm up for the challenge now.