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>1Gbps via UTP/STP question

Ichinisan

Lifer
Oct 9, 2002
28,298
1,228
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I assume the reason DOCSIS 3.1 modems have 2x network ports is because the 3.1 spec supports 2.5Gbps and most home devices don't support over 1,000mps. Even with both connections saturated, it would still be ~500Mbps short of the DOCSIS 3.1 maximum speed.

I wasn't sure of the status of 10GBASE-T, so I looked up the Wikipedia page for 10 Gigabit Ethernet:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/10_Gigabit_Ethernet

This line from the first section is confusing:

However, because of its bandwidth requirements, higher-grade copper cables are required: category 6a or Class F/Category 7 cables for links up to 100m.

That sounds wrong. These cables can already do 1,000mbps.

The 10GBASE-T section seems to clarify what I was looking for, but it contradicts that line from the first section.

I'd edit the wiki page, but I don't want to pretend that I know anything about 10GbE.

So will there eventually be 10GbE from from home networking equipment using standard 8P8C connectors, jacks, and UTP/STP cabling?
 
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ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
33,237
11,985
146
DOCSIS 3.1 supports 10gbit to the home

For 10GbE over copper, cat 7 cabling is recommended, cat 6a is supported, cat 6 is barely support over short distances IIRC

so yes, 10GbE someday to the home, when Telco's stop being dummies. I dunno about standard 8P8C connectors, jacks, etc... you wanna use stuff that match the cable type
 
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thecoolnessrune

Diamond Member
Jun 8, 2005
9,537
454
126
I assume the reason DOCSIS 3.1 modems have 2x network ports is because the 3.1 spec supports 2.5Gbps and most home devices don't support over 1,000mps. Even with both connections saturated, it would still be ~500Mbps short of the DOCSIS 3.1 maximum speed.

I wasn't sure of the status of 10GBASE-T, so I looked up the Wikipedia page for 10 Gigabit Ethernet:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/10_Gigabit_Ethernet

This line from the first section is confusing:

However, because of its bandwidth requirements, higher-grade copper cables are required: category 6a or Class F/Category 7 cables for links up to 100m.

That sounds wrong. These cables can already do 1,000mbps.

The 10GBASE-T section seems to clarify what I was looking for, but it contradicts that line from the first section.

I'd edit the wiki page, but I don't want to pretend that I know anything about 10GbE.

So will there eventually be 10GbE from from home networking equipment using standard 8P8C connectors, jacks, and UTP/STP cabling?
I'm not sure what I'm missing, but I don't see any conflict.

The first link says as you did: However, because of its bandwidth requirements, higher-grade copper cables are required: category 6a or Class F/Category 7 cables for links up to 100m.

The second link says the same thing: Category 6a is required to reach the full distance of 100 metres (330 ft) and category 6 may reach a distance of 55 metres (180 ft) depending on the quality of installation, determined only after re-testing to 500 MHz.

Category 6 cabling meeting specifications can do 10Gb at 55 Meters. It takes Category 6A to meet the specification of doing 10Gb at 100 Meters. Cat 7 allows 10Gb at 100 Meters as well.
 

Ichinisan

Lifer
Oct 9, 2002
28,298
1,228
136
"Links up to 100m" confused me. I thought it meant "100mbps." If it means "100 meters," it probably should have said "...lengths up to 100m."

I think I'm comfortable editing it now.
 

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