120Hz Monitor LIST -- Includes LightBoost, G-SYNC, Overclockable, etc.

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Mark Rejhon, Jul 11, 2013.

  1. Mark Rejhon

    Mark Rejhon Senior member

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    I've put together a nicely formatted 120Hz monitor list, because of the recent buzz about overclockable monitors and lightboost monitors, posted since the AnandTech BENQ XL2720T review.

    Useful List of 120Hz and 144Hz monitors
    (Updated January 2015)

    Types of Gaming-Compatible Motion Blur Reducing Strobe Backlights

    1. NVIDIA LightBoost -- the one that started it all! -- unofficial for 2D
    2. ULMB -- NVIDIA G-SYNC's optional strobe mode
    3. Eizo Turbo240 Mode -- official strobe backlight
    4. BENQ Blur Reduction Mode (XL2720Z) -- official strobe backlight
    5. Samsung 120Hz 3D Mode -- unofficial for 2D
    6. Sony Motionflow Impulse -- 60Hz interpolation-free low-latency mode
    Overclockable IPS/PLS Monitors
    ...monitors with a very large overclocking margin. No guarantee on top achievable refresh rate.
    - QNIX QX2710 Evolution 2 ........ 27″ 2560×1440 ~90Hz – 130Hz
    - X-Star DP2710 ...................... 27″ 2560×1440 ~90Hz – 130Hz
    - Overlord Tempest X270OC ....... 27″ 2560×1440 ~90Hz – 130Hz
    - Overlord PCB Upgrade ............. 27″ 2560×1440 ~90Hz – 130Hz
    - Catleap 2B ............................ 27″ 2560×1440 ~120Hz
    - Certain HDTV televisions ......... HDTV Refresh Overclocking HOWTO: 120Hz television as a monitor

    120Hz+ Monitors with strobe backlight
    Motion blur reducing strobe backlights: LightBoost, NVIDIA ULMB, EIZO Turbo240, and BENQ Blur Reduction
    ...has an optional strobe backlight that can eliminate motion blur. For LightBoost, see LightBoost HOWTO. Also, some monitors use nVidia G-SYNC, and there is also an optional LightBoost sequel strobe backlight mode with G-SYNC too
    - ASUS VG248QE .............. 24″ 1920×1080 144Hz ...... LightBoost
    - ASUS VG278HE .............. 27″ 1920×1080 144Hz ...... LightBoost
    - BENQ XL2411T ............... 24″ 1920×1080 144Hz ...... LightBoost
    - BENQ XL2420T ............... 24″ 1920×1080 120Hz ...... LightBoost
    - BENQ XL2420T Rev 2.0 .... 24″ 1920×1080 120Hz ...... LightBoost
    - BENQ XL2420TE ............. 24″ 1920×1080 144Hz ...... LightBoost
    - BENQ XL2720T ............... 27″ 1920×1080 120Hz ...... LightBoost
    - BENQ XL2411Z ............... 24″ 1920×1080 144Hz ...... BENQ Blur Reduction
    - BENQ XL2420Z ............... 24″ 1920×1080 144Hz ...... BENQ Blur Reduction
    - BENQ XL2720Z ............... 27″ 1920×1080 144Hz ...... BENQ Blur Reduction
    - EIZO Foris FS2421 .......... 23.5″ VA 1920×1080 120Hz native / 240Hz internal ...... Turbo240

    Monitors with GSYNC and FreeSync
    ...These monitors have NVIDIA G-SYNC or AMD FreeSync. They eliminate stutters, eliminate tearing, and reduce input lag.
    - ASUS VG248QE GSYNC .............. 24″ 1920×1080 144Hz Ultra Low Motion Blur (ULMB)
    - BENQ XL2420G ........................ 24″ 1920×1080 144Hz ULMB
    - Philips 272G5DYEB ................... 27″ 1920×1080 144Hz ULMB
    - AOC g2460Pg (Europe) ............... 24″ 1920×1080 144Hz ULMB
    - Acer XB270H ............................ 27″ 1920×1080 144Hz ULMB
    - Acer XB280HK (4K Ultra HD) ....... 28″ 3840×2160 60Hz
    - ASUS ROG Swift PG278Q ............ 27″ 2560×1440 144Hz ULMB

    Older LightBoost Monitors
    ...These models are now discontinued
    - ASUS VG278H ................. 24″ 1920×1080 120Hz ...... LightBoost
    - BENQ XL2420TX .............. 24″ 1920×1080 120Hz ...... LightBoost
    - ACER HN274HB bmiiid ....... 27″ 1920×1080 120Hz ...... LightBoost

    Older Samsung 120Hz Monitors
    ...has a strobe backlight that can eliminate motion blur, see Samsung Zero Motion Blur HOWTO
    - Samsung S23A700D ....... 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
    - Samsung S23A750D ....... 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
    - Samsung S23A950D ....... 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
    - Samsung S27A700D ....... 27″ 1920×1080 120Hz
    - Samsung S27A750D ....... 27″ 1920×1080 120Hz
    - Samsung S27A950D ....... 27″ 1920×1080 120Hz

    Other/Older 120Hz Monitors
    ...These monitors have no strobe backlight to reduce motion blur even further. Most of these monitors are discontinued.
    - Philips 242G5DJEB ................... 24″ 1920×1080 144Hz
    - ASUS VG236H ........................ 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
    - ASUS VG236HE ...................... 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
    - AOC g2460Pqu ....................... 24″ 1920×1080 120Hz
    - BENQ XL2410T ....................... 24″ 1920×1080 120Hz
    - ACER GN245HQ, GD245HQ ........ 24″ 1920×1080 120Hz
    - ACER GD235HZ ...................... 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
    - ACER HN274H bmiiid ............... 27″ 1920×1080 120Hz
    - Iiyama Prolite G2773HS ........... 27" 1920×1080 120Hz
    - Alienware AW2310 ................. 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
    - Planar SA2311W .................... 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
    - LG W2363D-PF ...................... 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
    - Samsung 2233rz .................... 22″ 1680×1050 120Hz
    - Hanns-G HS233H3B ................ 23″ 1920×1080 120Hz
    - Viewsonic VX2265wm ............. 22″ 1680×1050 120Hz
    - Viewsonic VX2268wm ............. 22″ 1680×1050 120Hz
    - Viewsonic V3D245 .................. 24″ 1920×1080 120Hz

    Speciality Monitors
    - Viewpixx Scientific Research LCD ...... 22" ...... 1920×1200 IPS 120Hz
    - Eizo DuraVision FDF2405W ............... 23.5" ... 1920×1200 VA 120Hz native / 240Hz internal
    ____

    Sony Low-Lag Motionflow Impulse TV's
    ...These low-lag TV's are only 60Hz but motion "looks better than 120Hz" because of Motionflow Impulse (similar to LightBoost) that works in Game Mode, low-lag and without interpolation. "Impulse" is Sony's strobe backlight similiar to "LightBoost". A godsend for motion-blur-weary console/HTPC 60fps gamers that don't want to go plasma, it is the world's first low-lag motionflow mode for Game Mode. As long as you don't mind 60Hz CRT-style flicker.
    - Sony HX920 Series
    - Sony HX923 Series
    - Sony HX925 Series
    - Sony HX929 Series
    - Sony XBR-55HX950
    - Sony XBR-65HX950
    - Sony KDL-47W802A (Budget)
    - Sony KDL-55w802A (Budget)
    - Sony KDL-55W900A
    - Sony KDL-55W905A
    - Sony XBR-55X900A (4K Ultra)
    - Sony XBR-65X900A (4K Ultra)

    ____

    (Based on List of 120Hz monitors)

    To Monitor Manufacturers: We need IPS/PLS LightBoost or strobe backlights. Better color quality. People are asking for it! Here's some links: lightboost media coverage (includes the AnandTech article), lightboost rave reviews, and customer reviews of VG248QE on amazon (hit Control+F and find "lightoost" in all the reviews). It actually sells lots of monitors for ASUS, and even ASUS/NewEgg acknowledged this in their youtube interview (at 05:18). We definitely need to see this technology become more common, and an easy ON/OFF feature.
    EDIT: It's finally starting to happen. EIZO Turbo240, G-SYNC's optional strobe mode, BENQ Blur Reduction, etc.
    ____

    Useful monitor tests:
    - Lagom LCD (test patterns for picture adjustments)
    - TestUFO Motion Tests (motion tests, easier than PixPerAn)
     
    #1 Mark Rejhon, Jul 11, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2015
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  3. 24601

    24601 Golden Member

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    +1 vote for sticky.
     
  4. stahlhart

    stahlhart Elite Member<br>Super Moderator <br> Video Cards &
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    Sure, no problem.
     
  5. jackstar7

    jackstar7 Diamond Member

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    Excellent list. Hope to see the Lightboost section grow. Hope a little more that we see the next gen of LB tech potentially directly address motion-blur as a feature and bring an end to the need for all the extra work that led to the initials hacks and programs. It'd be nice to see an implementation out of the box.
     
  6. Black Octagon

    Black Octagon Golden Member

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    Great work as always, Mark. However I would suggest that the first section be renamed from 'Overclockable 120 Monitors' to 'Overclockable IPS/PLS Monitors.' The reason is that 120hz, while very often achieved as an overclock on these monitors, is never guaranteed. A not insignificant number of folks only achieve 96-119hz, and that's fine so long as they don't spend their money because they assume that they will get 120hz.

    Now all we need is an overclockable 1440p IPS monitor WITH LIGHTBOOST
     
  7. Mark Rejhon

    Mark Rejhon Senior member

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    To stahlhart: A sticky, wow, thanks! I'll make sure to maintain the list.
    To BlackOctagon: You are correct, BlackOctagon. Edited!

    -- Some of overclockable models (e.g. Overlord) can be obtained with a 120Hz guarantee for an extra cost. Most purchasers do go for the much cheaper but less-guaranteed QNIX, though.

    -- I agree about 1440p IPS strobe mode. Preferably true official 120Hz without overclocking. We need more Motion Blur Reduction Backlights (TFTCentral article) such as LightBoost. Tests have found LightBoost massively outperforms yesterday's pathetic scanning backlights, by a gigantic margin (92% less motion blur than a 60Hz monitor -- see photos of 60Hz vs 120Hz vs LightBoost), allowing CRT motion clarity on LCD's. This needs to arrive on IPS / PLS monitors, and with easy ON/OFF with good color quality (and including PWM free mode when blur-eliminating strobe is disabled).
     
    #6 Mark Rejhon, Jul 11, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013
  8. Obsoleet

    Obsoleet Platinum Member

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    I actually checked out your site and looked into this before I purchased my latest monitor (Asus VS278Q-P), and determined this is not for me due to the 120FPS requirement to gleam the benefits out of technology like Lightboost or Samsung's (http://www.blurbusters.com/zero-motion-blur/samsung/) . Though I found myself most interested in Samsung's because it's not software-dependent (but still requires 120FPS).
    There's also the issue of games hardcoded at 60FPS, like most id Software games, Mortal Kombat 9, and so forth which is yet another hurdle.

    I went for a low input lag, low response rate LCD with a better price. Possibly another thing for people to look into for a new monitor is an IPS panel for color accuracy.
    In particular my thoughts were summed up from a post on your HOWTO (http://www.blurbusters.com/zero-motion-blur/lightboost/)-

    +1 waiting for OLED.
     
    #7 Obsoleet, Jul 11, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2013
  9. Mark Rejhon

    Mark Rejhon Senior member

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    Yes, LightBoost is artifically limited to 100Hz-120Hz range. Similiar to a CRT that can only sync to 100Hz-120Hz. There is a workaround; you can do software-based black-frame insertion to get blur-reduced 60Hz on a 120Hz monitor. There's some versions of MAME that do this: www.blurbusters.com/mame ... If you combine this with LightBoost, you get 92% less motion blur during 60Hz MAME emulation.

    In addition, new Sony HDTV's have a 60Hz LightBoost-like feature called "Motionflow Impulse" (no interpolation!) if you want a 60Hz LightBoost equivalent today, in a living room HDTV, for video game consoles. The 2013 model high end Sony HDTV's (Sony KDL-55W905A with Motionflow XR 960) allows you to turn this on during Game Mode. A LightBoost-equivalent in your living room!

    Agreed about OLED, but be warned about the OLED sample-and-hold issue. See Why Do Some OLED's Have Motion Blur?. The clearest-motion LCD's have less motion blur than many OLED's such as Playstation Vita and Samsung Galaxy S3 which still blurs when you do fast smooth scrolling. Even the OLED's that strobe, don't strobe briefly enough yet. The expensive Sony Trimaster OLED monitors (Sony model PVM-2541) have 7.5ms of motion blur (see paragraph before Figure 20), which is worse than LightBoost's 1.4ms to 2.8ms of motion blur (depending on LightBoost setting -- see graph of motion blur for different LightBoost settings). Motion blur is dictated by the on-to-off cycle, not by the pixel transition speed.

    The sample-and-hold effect can be a motion blur problem even for displays with instant 0ms transitions (why?).

    That said, OLED has vastly superior looking colors, and stunning black levels.
     
    #8 Mark Rejhon, Jul 12, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2013
  10. Obsoleet

    Obsoleet Platinum Member

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    Contact me when AMD or NV offer 60hz 'Lightboost' in drivers. I won't buy a 120hz monitor though due to too many games having hardcoded 60FPS limits.
    Which is going to become even more prevelant not just for the programming difficulties of not having a set 'tick rate' (a 120FPS tick is way too high), but also due to the new consoles likely having even more crossovers (being x86 based).

    For me, that's not the greatest compliment to traditional LCDs. If the BEST of them can beat the WORST of a new emerging technology like OLED? Heh. I'm going to wait and see how OLED develops over the next few years.

    Till then thanks to the 60FPS lock in many top games today, hopefully NV or AMD will come to the rescue to both 120hz and 60hz users with 'Lightboost' for 60hz. That would benefit all of us. I can see why they would have an interest in keeping it a 'premium' feature for those willing to $truggle to maintain 120FPS in the latest games though ;) I'm not biting there.
     
    #9 Obsoleet, Jul 12, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2013
  11. Will Robinson

    Will Robinson Golden Member

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    Nice post Mark ...thanks for the info,updates and comments.:thumbsup:
     
  12. Black Octagon

    Black Octagon Golden Member

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    IMHO there aren't that many 60fps-locked games out there, especially when you consider how many can be unlocked with a tweak of an ini file or other relatively straightforward change
     
  13. Rikard

    Rikard Senior member

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    Your website mentions HDTVs that can be used as 120 Hz PC screens. Could you please add those to the OP?

    I have a somewhat related question: My screen (see signature) in some instances is listed as 1920x1080 @ 75 Hz, but this never appears as an option, only 60 Hz. Using the hacks you know do you think it would be possible to run it in 75 Hz?
     
  14. Mark Rejhon

    Mark Rejhon Senior member

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    Yes, it was discovered that several newer HDTV's now can do true native 120Hz. The link is already there now, at the bottom of the Overclockable section.

    It's a subtle overclock: This is generally not a panel overclock like the others (These televisions already do 120Hz during internal interpolation). Rather it's an input overclock (forcing 120Hz over HDMI, bypassing EDID override, to get true 120Hz native without interpolation). The Comments section include successful televisions with true 120 Hz as computer monitors.
     
    #13 Mark Rejhon, Jul 12, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2013
  15. Octopuss

    Octopuss Golden Member

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    Great idea for a thread.
    But please, could you list exact panel type for each monitor? Sure I could google each of them up, but it's a bit... awkward. Seeing a list of whatever-IPS based monitors right away would be awesome.
     
  16. darckhart

    darckhart Senior member

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    excellent sticky.
     
  17. omeds

    omeds Senior member

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    Any tips to make the image look decent with lightboost activated? I've tried it on 2 different displays now and its unplayable because it looks so bad, no matter the tweaking I seem to do.
     
  18. Rikard

    Rikard Senior member

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    Using that information, and especially this thread, I got my PC screen to OC 75 Hz instead of the usual 60 Hz at 1920x1080. :awe: Thank you!

    I would like to do the same for my 3D HDTV, only take it up to 120 Hz if it can handle it. I must connect it with a HDMI 1.4 cable. Does that share the 165 Mhz pixel clock limitation of single-link DVI, or can I go higher like with DVI-D?
     
    #17 Rikard, Jul 12, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2013
  19. Mark Rejhon

    Mark Rejhon Senior member

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    nVidia LightBoost was originally calibrated by nVidia for 3D Vision. nVidia modifies the LUT's during LightBoost mode to increase gamma to make things brighter through 3D glasses. So Gamma=0.7 or Gamma=0.8 in LightBoost is the same as Gamma=1.0 in non-LightBoost, so you need to do the gamma compensation everytime you turn on/off LightBoost.

    To fix LightBoost colors, can be easier on some monitors (e.g. VG278H) and harder on others (e.g. VG248QE). Usually, the most common LightBoost color fix is to lower the gamma in nVidia Control Panel downwards to about ~0.85 (and sometimes lower) because that "undoes" the forced LightBoost gamma bump. One disadvantage is that it makes LightBoost even darker.

    These settings look really good on VG278H but not as good for VG248QE:
    VG278H Monitor Menu Contrast = 85% or 90% (more LightBoost crosstalk/trailing, but better colors/contrast)
    nVidia Control Panel Brightness = 52%
    nVidia Control Panel Contrast = 45%
    nVidia Control Panel Gamma = 0.7
    (via "Adjust Desktop color settings")

    On the VG278H, the colors come back, the contrast comes back, but you will still be stuck with the LightBoost brightness loss (it's brighter when sync'd through 3D glasses, it's darker when used for 2D). If the gamma gets too dark, try Gamma = 0.85 and use nVidia Brightness=50% / nVidia Contrast=47%

    The numbers above were chosen to avoid white clipping/black clipping while fixing gamma. Good test patterns to use is Lagom LCD patterns, and making sure you can see all shades in Lagom Contrast and Lagom Blacks. A colorimeter such as Spyder4 or i1 Pro helps a lot, too.
     
    #18 Mark Rejhon, Jul 12, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2013
  20. Mark Rejhon

    Mark Rejhon Senior member

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    Except for the Overclockables, all of them are TN at this time of writing (July 2013)
     
  21. 24601

    24601 Golden Member

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    TN panel + lightboost messing hard with AFC will still give you severely inferior color reproduction compared to newest LG IPS or Samsung PLS.

    AFC needs to seriously die in a fire. eIPS is the stupidest idea ever in bringing the extra blur from AFC in TN panels to IPS.

    Just make 8-bit TN panels or have the option of keeping TN at 6-bit (instead of AFC) for blur reduction.
     
  22. Mark Rejhon

    Mark Rejhon Senior member

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    No disagreement on needing better colors, and seeing LightBoost (or equivalents) arrive on better LCD panels. That said, the gamma bleaching effect is horrible and the monitor manufacturers lock the monitor's picture adjustments (perhaps an nVidia contract clause), preventing picture adjustments on the monitor side of things. So it is a pick-your-poison effect. There are people who find motion blur a bigger problem than color reproduction, so the gamma compensation via nVidia Control Panel can become the lesser of evils in this situation. At least until the monitors improve (more adjustability on monitor side, better panels for LightBoost, etc). That said, several people (more motion blur sensitive people) have been able to fix LightBoost colors (on specific models; XL2720T and VG278H) to the point they can't tell apart color quality between LB and non-LB, but see the massive motion blur reduction. Some people are pickier on color, and others are pickier on motion blur.

    It also reportedly worked over HDMI 1.3 cables in certain cases.
    HDMI 1.3 has a single-link bandwidth of 340 Mhz, enough for 1080p@120Hz.

    Don't use DVI-to-HDMI adaptors unless you find a DVI adaptor that can merge the two channels of DVI-D to a single 340Mhz HDMI channel (very few exist). Until such adaptors become common, 120Hz HDMI is easiest with a direct cable connection from HDMI port to the display. It is hit-and-miss, as the 1.3 specifications did not specify 1080p@120Hz.

    The cable electrical specifications just need to be high bandwidth enough, and the HDMI chip able to take advantage of the full bandwidth. Even HDMI 1.3a currently has the bandwidth to support 4K@30Hz, which is exactly the same bandwidth as 1080p@120Hz. But many HDMI chips don't often support the unofficial modes (1080p@120Hz) though. Until recently.

    However, HDMI 1.4 (cable and chipsets) makes 1080p@120Hz FAR more likely to work. Less "overclocking barriers" for certain displays. There's been a 100% success rate of doing 1080p@120Hz over HDMI on the cheap SEIKI 4K HDTV's for example (the $699 39" 4K TV, and the $1299 50" 4K HDTV) if you connect directly from the HDMI output of a recent 7000-series Radeon or 600/700-series GeForce card, directly to the HDMI port of the television. You may need to bypass HDMI switches and receivers, to make 1080p@120Hz or 720p@120Hz reach the display.
     
    #21 Mark Rejhon, Jul 12, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2013
  23. 24601

    24601 Golden Member

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    I guess I'm stuck in the category that can't deal with either of them :O.
    I'm an ad-hoc optical engineer/image recognition automation programmer for a medical research lab as well as an old school computer FPS gamer and hardware enthusiast :O.

    It's the worst combination of picky >.<
     
  24. omeds

    omeds Senior member

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    Thanks mark, I've owned both the VG278H and VG248QE. I can see all shades in the Lagrom tests and tried your settings, but the image is stilll terrible. I think it's just not for me and prefer regular 144hz 2D.
     
  25. Mark Rejhon

    Mark Rejhon Senior member

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    You'll have to wait until other manufacturers come out with better-quality LightBoost. Or other manufacturers, such has EIZO, come out with monitors with motion-blur-eliminating strobe backlights. I've heard of developments.

    If any rich gamers here has thousands of dollars to spend on a non-consumer product, check out the Viewpixx Scientific Research Monitor (and PDF datasheet). Has 1920x1200, 12-bit color, 120Hz ability, wide-gamut (>100% NTSC), 1ms response via scanning backlight (like LightBoost).

    They have also developed PROPixx, a projector capable of a 500Hz native refresh rate! This is a native refresh rate, without interpolation. It is one of the highest native refresh rates available on the market for a display.

    [​IMG]
     
    #24 Mark Rejhon, Jul 13, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2013
  26. imaheadcase

    imaheadcase Diamond Member

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    Lots of Indie games are, lots on steam are.