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1080i Mode on HTPC

jacktesterson

Diamond Member
Sep 28, 2001
5,493
3
81
Hi Folks,

My G530 rig is currently plugged into a 50" 720p/1080i Plasma TV. Its 1366x768. I noticed when watching HD movies, or HD Netflix, or Even gsming, my set looks better at 1080i compared to default 1366x768.

Short story- TV will accept 1920x1080 resolution, so scales automatically. (I can set PC res to 1920x1080 and it works in 1080i mode)

I use the CCC and set the TV Resolution to 1080i Mode usually though.

Everything other than text seems to look better/sharper.

Is this normal? One would think watching at its native resolution off 1366x768 would look better than using 1080i setting?
 

fuzzymath10

Senior member
Feb 17, 2010
520
2
81
Is it mapping pixels properly? There is usually some setting for PC signals. When I had a 720P LCD, 1080i looked horrendous but 1360x768 was pixel perfect.

What interface are you using? HDMI?
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
51,953
6,895
126
I've noticed that my Westinghouse 32" LCD will accept a 1920x1080 signal over HDMI too, and then displays it in 1080i. But it looks pretty crappy, with the scanlines. So I keep it at 1366x768.
 

jacktesterson

Diamond Member
Sep 28, 2001
5,493
3
81
I just tested it again with a 1080p MKV Movie. It looked noticeably better at 1080i compared to 1366x768. I noticed games look better too.

Same with blu ray playback.

Anything else looks better at 1366x768, especially text,web browsing, etc

TV is set to "Just Scan".. Even though its a 720p/1080i set, its 5 years old and was $3000 when bought new. (I'm original owner). It has a nicer picture than any cheap 1080p tv I usually see.
 
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Lorne

Senior member
Feb 5, 2001
874
1
76
My old POS Emperex does the same thing, When I bought it there was no features advertised supporting HD or 1080i only 720 even in the crappy manual.
But when I hit HD channels, BR player or puter the pictures are so much better upscalled to 1080i.

I admit its not comparative to to newer 1080p screens but its very good for a 10yo tv not made for it.
 

kalrith

Diamond Member
Aug 22, 2005
6,630
7
81
Here's a thought. Nothing outputs 1366x768 resolution except for a PC. So, maybe you're in PC mode at that resolution but in video mode at 1080i. Some TVs greatly limit the picture settings in PC mode. Also, your TV settings might just be set better in video mode than PC mode. If you have a BD player, then you can get a calibration disc to help with the TV settings (or check avsforum for help).

PC mode will look better for text, because it doesn't scale: it does 1:1 pixel mapping (or at least it should).

I prefer running my HTPC at 1080p rather than 1360x768. My TV doesn't accept 1366x768, which is the native res, so there's a 6-pixel-wide black spot on one side of the screen.

Can your TV accept a 1080p signal?
 

jacktesterson

Diamond Member
Sep 28, 2001
5,493
3
81
Here's a thought. Nothing outputs 1366x768 resolution except for a PC. So, maybe you're in PC mode at that resolution but in video mode at 1080i. Some TVs greatly limit the picture settings in PC mode. Also, your TV settings might just be set better in video mode than PC mode. If you have a BD player, then you can get a calibration disc to help with the TV settings (or check avsforum for help).

PC mode will look better for text, because it doesn't scale: it does 1:1 pixel mapping (or at least it should).

I prefer running my HTPC at 1080p rather than 1360x768. My TV doesn't accept 1366x768, which is the native res, so there's a 6-pixel-wide black spot on one side of the screen.

Can your TV accept a 1080p signal?

TV has no "PC" settings anywhere to be found.

Computer detects max screen resolution of 1920x1080. Has with any card I've owned over last 5-6 years. It will let you set 1920x1080, then the TV goes into 1080i mode. When running at the native Resolution, the TV actually shows it being set to 1366x768. When resolution is set to 1920x1080, it shows as "1080i"

Using the CCC to set resolution to 1080i mode is exact same thing. It just changes the Res to 1920x1080 in resolution settings.
 

jacktesterson

Diamond Member
Sep 28, 2001
5,493
3
81
So, there's no 1080p mode in CCC? What TV model is it?
It's not a 1080p TV.



Its an LG. Model # no idea, can look when I'm home if you want. It's from 2007 era. It was a high end TV in its day. (Paid 3 grand for it)
 
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KingFatty

Diamond Member
Dec 29, 2010
3,034
1
81
Can you elaborate on how the two different modes look?

I mean, it seems like pixel-perfect would look the best, and using something else would involve some kind of translation/adjustment that would alter the intended look.

But, some scenes would look better when altered, like applying a "soften/blur" type of filter to the whole image in certain scenes.

Is that what's happening? When you use pixel-perfect reproduction, it just looks too plain/normal like a soul-less computer screen? Then when you put it in 1080i mode, the TV will soften/blur things to provide some warmth/softness that you subjectively prefer?

Or is something else happening, such as the pixel-perfect reproduction is actually corrupted or somehow deficient/flawed, and you objectively dislike the flawed reproduction in that mode? Is the 1080i therefore less-erroneous somehow, and therefore better because it is less flawed?

If you are playing Hulu or some video (DVD?) that is lower resolution than your display, perhaps the softening filter makes it look better by concealing details like the pixelation effects. Is that what's happening, the TV is disguising the defects that would be visible if your display were perfect?
 

kalrith

Diamond Member
Aug 22, 2005
6,630
7
81
It's not a 1080p TV.

Setting 1080i or 1080p in CCC do the exact same thing, TV goes to 1080i mode. (Which is understandable)

Its an LG. Model # no idea, can look when I'm home if you want. It's from 2007 era. It was a high end TV in its day. (Paid 3 grand for it)
There is a difference between the resolutions that can be input to a TV and its native resolution. Some 768p TVs can accept 1080i or 1080p, and some can only accept 1080i. I purchased my TV in 2008. It's a Pioneer 5080 with 1366x768 native res, and it accepts 1080p as input. It would be great to have the model number of your TV to see if 1080p is possible. My text and web browsing looks fine on my TV using 1080p as input, so you might experience the same if we can figure out how to get your TV to accept 1080p (assuming it's possible).

What cable connection are you using? Is it direct or routed through a receiver?

Also, what video card do you have?
 

jacktesterson

Diamond Member
Sep 28, 2001
5,493
3
81
There is a difference between the resolutions that can be input to a TV and its native resolution. Some 768p TVs can accept 1080i or 1080p, and some can only accept 1080i. I purchased my TV in 2008. It's a Pioneer 5080 with 1366x768 native res, and it accepts 1080p as input. It would be great to have the model number of your TV to see if 1080p is possible. My text and web browsing looks fine on my TV using 1080p as input, so you might experience the same if we can figure out how to get your TV to accept 1080p (assuming it's possible).

What cable connection are you using? Is it direct or routed through a receiver?

Also, what video card do you have?
You are correct. I am home now and tried 1080p and the TV says "1080p" and everything looks great. I know 100% its a 1366x768 TV, but setting to 1080p has a better picture.

7850 is currently plugged into it, HDMI Direct to TV. This isn't my main TV. Usually the 4850 is plugged in direct.
 
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