Go Back   AnandTech Forums > Hardware and Technology > Highly Technical

Forums
· Hardware and Technology
· CPUs and Overclocking
· Motherboards
· Video Cards and Graphics
· Memory and Storage
· Power Supplies
· Cases & Cooling
· SFF, Notebooks, Pre-Built/Barebones PCs
· Networking
· Peripherals
· General Hardware
· Highly Technical
· Computer Help
· Home Theater PCs
· Consumer Electronics
· Digital and Video Cameras
· Mobile Devices & Gadgets
· Audio/Video & Home Theater
· Software
· Software for Windows
· All Things Apple
· *nix Software
· Operating Systems
· Programming
· PC Gaming
· Console Gaming
· Distributed Computing
· Security
· Social
· Off Topic
· Politics and News
· Discussion Club
· Love and Relationships
· The Garage
· Health and Fitness
· Home and Garden
· Merchandise and Shopping
· For Sale/Trade
· Hot Deals with Free Stuff/Contests
· Black Friday 2014
· Forum Issues
· Technical Forum Issues
· Personal Forum Issues
· Suggestion Box
· Moderator Resources
· Moderator Discussions
   

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-15-2012, 02:26 PM   #1
William Gaatjes
Diamond Member
 
William Gaatjes's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: s orbital
Posts: 8,672
Default solidstate room temperature masers are coming and interesting side effect discovered

More amazing news : Solid state masers operating at room temperature are coming to a place near you soon !

The side effect that is interesting :
"
Conventional MASER technology using hard inorganic crystals such as ruby, only works when the ruby is kept at a very low temperature. The team in today's study have discovered that a completely different type of crystal, namely p-terphenyl doped with pentacene, can replace ruby and replicate the same masing process at room temperature.
As a curious twist, the pentacene dopant turns the otherwise colourless p-terphenyl crystal an intense reddish pink – making it look just like ruby!

"

http://phys.org/news/2012-08-maser-p...lid-state.html

Quote:
Scientists demonstrate, for the time, a solid-state "MASER" capable of operating at room temperature, paving the way for its widespread adoption – as reported today in the journal Nature.

MASER stands for Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. Devices based on this process (and known by the same acronym) were developed by scientists more than 50 years ago, before the first LASERs were invented. Instead of creating intense beams of light, as in the case of LASERs, MASERs deliver a concentrated beam of microwaves.

Conventional MASER technology works by amplifying microwaves using hard inorganic crystals such as ruby, this process is known as "masing". However, the MASER has had little technological impact compared to the LASER because getting it to work has always required extreme conditions that are difficult to produce; either extremely low pressures, supplied by special vacuum chambers and pumps, or freezing conditions at temperatures close to absolute zero (-273.15C), supplied by special refrigerators. To make matters worse, the application of strong magnetic fields has often also been necessary, requiring large magnets.

Now, the team from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and Imperial College London have demonstrated masing in a solid-state device working in air at room temperature with no applied magnetic field. Today's breakthrough means that the cost to manufacture and operate MASERs could be dramatically reduced, which could lead to them becoming as widely used as LASER technology.

The researchers suggest that room-temperature MASERs could be used to make more sensitive medical instruments for scanning patients, improved chemical sensors for remotely detecting explosives; lower-noise read-out mechanisms for quantum computers and better radio telescopes for potentially detecting life on other planets.

Dr Mark Oxborrow, co-author of the study at NPL, says: "For half a century the MASER has been the forgotten, inconvenient cousin of the LASER. Our design breakthrough will enable MASERs to be used by industry and consumers."

Professor Neil Alford, co-author and Head of the Department of Materials at Imperial College London, adds: "When LASERs were invented no one quite knew exactly how they would be used, and yet the technology flourished to the point that LASERs have now become ubiquitous in our everyday lives. We've still got a long way to go before the MASER reaches that level, but our breakthrough does mean that this technology can literally come out of the cold and start becoming more useful."

Conventional MASER technology using hard inorganic crystals such as ruby, only works when the ruby is kept at a very low temperature. The team in today's study have discovered that a completely different type of crystal, namely p-terphenyl doped with pentacene, can replace ruby and replicate the same masing process at room temperature.
As a curious twist, the pentacene dopant turns the otherwise colourless p-terphenyl crystal an intense reddish pink – making it look just like ruby!


The twin challenges the team currently face are getting the MASER to work continuously, as their first device only works in pulsed mode for fractions of a second at a time. They also aim to get it to operate over a range of microwave frequencies, instead of its current narrow bandwidth, which would make the technology more useful.

In the long-term, the team have a range of other goals including the identification of different materials that can mase at room temperature while consuming less power than pentacene-doped p-terphenyl. The team will also focus on creating new designs that could make the MASER smaller and more portable.

More information: "Room-temperature solid-state maser", published in Nature 16 August 2012. http://www.nature.com/nature/journal...ture11339.html

Journal reference: Nature

Provided by National Physical Laboratory


More information on ruby masers :

http://www.daenotes.com/electronics/...#axzz23dnZ9ETJ



Quote:
The RUBY MASER consist of a ruby crytal kept in the cavity. The cavity is inclosed by a jacket of liquid helium in order to observe the heat generated by the ruby crystal during operation.
For further cooling the jacket of liquied nitrogen is used at the outermost surface of the ruby maser. A pump input is provided to the cavity in order to excite the ruby crystal.
The input and output of microwave frequencyies is given through the divice known as circulator.
A permanent magnet is also used across the maser.

How does it work ?
When the pump input is provided to the cavity the electron in the ruby maser moves from lower energy band to the higher energy band. The population inversion takes place which results to fall back of the electrons from high energy band to the lower energy band. During this time the electrons emits the photons which produces the microwave frequency. The field of this frequency excites the cavity. As a result the oscillation takes place inside the cavity at the microwave length of frequency.

When the high range R.F ainput signal is applied to the cavity through circulator, It finds itself in the high level of signal at the same frequency inside the cavity so the output of this signal is taken from the output port of the circulator in amplified form.

The input and output port between the circulator and cavity is the same. It is possible due to the reason that when the input is maximum at the input port. It is minimum at the cavity port, because the distance between these two ports is λ/4. The same is the case for the output signal.


History of ruby masers :
http://descanso.jpl.nasa.gov/Monogra...id_chapt+3.pdf
__________________
To expand ones knowledge is to expand ones life.
<< Armchair Solomon >>
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

Last edited by William Gaatjes; 08-15-2012 at 02:32 PM.
William Gaatjes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2012, 05:27 PM   #2
wirednuts
Diamond Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 7,121
Default

awesome!

does this mean we might actually get $20 disc burners that hold terabytes without being prone to dataloss?

what does this mean actually? what could we do with cheap microwave lasers? can i hook them to a wall socket and turn it into a phaser?
wirednuts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2012, 02:02 PM   #3
Raghu
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Bangalore
Posts: 379
Default

^^ No. But we can make cool weapons that boil people/plants from far. And a tin foil hat will be a good shield to protect your brain
Raghu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-19-2012, 03:14 PM   #4
serpretetsky
Senior Member
 
serpretetsky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 514
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wirednuts View Post
awesome!

does this mean we might actually get $20 disc burners that hold terabytes without being prone to dataloss?

what does this mean actually? what could we do with cheap microwave lasers? can i hook them to a wall socket and turn it into a phaser?
microwaves are the wrong direction.
microwaves - InfraRed - Visible - Ultra Violet - X-ray

we used to be making cd burners with red light visible light, then came dvd burners with orange visible light, blu ray players use blu visible light.

The next optical storage would move towards ultra violet and x-ray, not microwave.
serpretetsky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2012, 04:23 PM   #5
Douglaster
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 29
Default

One step closer to Laser swords :p
Douglaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2012, 04:43 PM   #6
wuliheron
Diamond Member
 
wuliheron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,546
Default

Right now masers are used to communicate with satellites. For example, the Voyager spacecraft is some 10 billion miles away and can get away with using a 23 watt radio to send messages back to earth because we have giant dish antennas powerful enough to detect a signal weaker than a snowflake hitting the ground. The problem is sending a signal back to Voyager which has a much smaller antenna and not nearly as much power to amplify signals. A conventional microwave signal broadcast would spread out in all directions and require enormous power to cover the distance and still be picked up. A maser is like a laser and the beam doesn't spread nearly as much and a lot less power can be used to contact Voyager.

Theoretically such a room temperature maser could be useful for cellphone towers, any satellite in orbit, or any line of sight microwave communications requiring a lot of power. Not sure how useful it would be as a weapon or for much else, but I'm sure people will figure out other uses if it becomes cheap. However, this first one is a very crude prototype that isn't good for much and designing these kinds of things can be as much an art as a science. Something the British have been famous for though since they invented radar in WWII.
wuliheron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2012, 05:41 PM   #7
bwanaaa
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Posts: 690
Default

i bet you could make the perfect soldering iron. heat the solder from the inside first. also, i bet nathan myrvold will figure out a way to cook with it-can you imagine tiger striped filet mignon that is rare with pencil thin stripes of pink?

i would worry about the brain thing though- it will certainly contribute to our stupidification - some company will put it into the next smartphone, tell us it's safe and we'll slowly cook our temporal lobes.
__________________
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
sorry i dont have references for this basic knowledge at my fingertips, but i did read it somewhere and dont remember the source.
bwanaaa is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.