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Old 07-12-2012, 05:19 AM   #1
kithylin
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Default Ivy Bridge Memory Voltages

This is somewhat overclocking related and more of general system related.

I'm upgrading from an I7-920 LGA-1366 system to an Ivy Bridge core i5 system and I'm wondering about memory voltages.

I know with the i7-920 we could set the memory to a maximum of +0.50v from the cpu's core voltage.

Is this still true with ivy bridge, or does the cpu and memory have to be of the same voltage now?
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Old 07-12-2012, 07:10 AM   #2
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Max is 1.575V on Ivy before warranty void.

On your i7 920 it was 1.65V.
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Old 07-12-2012, 10:10 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by ShintaiDK View Post
Max is 1.575V on Ivy before warranty void.

On your i7 920 it was 1.65V.
+1 Thanks ShinaiDK

The voltage on the memory for the 2nd and 3rd generation Intel® Core™ processors is 1.5v (1.425v to 1.575v). Of course if you buy the Intel® Performance Tuning Plan you can run whatever you want without worrying about voiding your warranty.
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Old 07-12-2012, 10:31 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by IntelEnthusiast View Post
+1 Thanks ShinaiDK

The voltage on the memory for the 2nd and 3rd generation Intel® Core™ processors is 1.5v (1.425v to 1.575v). Of course if you buy the Intel® Performance Tuning Plan you can run whatever you want without worrying about voiding your warranty.
Running lower voltages don't void your warranty, do they? I think SB/IB support DDR3L.
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Old 07-12-2012, 10:33 AM   #5
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Running lower voltages don't void your warranty, do they? I think SB/IB support DDR3L.

Outside of spec is outside of spec. There may be areas where relative voltages matter, and lowering one voltage creates a larger differential than otherwise would exist, so yes, it is potentially the same problem.

If they suppory low voltage explicity, than that is in the ok range, so don't worry about it. If they don't, don't assume it is ok to do it though. The risk is low, but technically, you're still ruining your warranty.
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Old 07-12-2012, 10:56 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by IntelEnthusiast View Post
+1 Thanks ShinaiDK

The voltage on the memory for the 2nd and 3rd generation Intel® Core™ processors is 1.5v (1.425v to 1.575v). Of course if you buy the Intel® Performance Tuning Plan you can run whatever you want without worrying about voiding your warranty.
I didn't know about the Performance Tuning Plan. Seems like an interesting idea.
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Old 07-12-2012, 01:16 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by ShintaiDK View Post
Max is 1.575V on Ivy before warranty void.

On your i7 920 it was 1.65V.
Well the thing is the voltage differential on the i7 is 0.50v, which means if the cpu was set to 1.35v or 1.45v, then the ram could be 1.85v, or 1.95v without damaging the CPU. This isn't well known or well documented but it is true and does work.

I'm just wondering if the same is true with ivy bridge, or is it a hard 1.575v max for ivy bridge flat out?

Last edited by kithylin; 07-12-2012 at 01:17 PM. Reason: Fixing Typos
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Old 07-12-2012, 01:17 PM   #8
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Well the thing is the voltage differential on the i7 is 0.50v, which means if the cpu was set to 1.35v or 1.45v, then the ram could be 1.85v, or 1.95v without damaging the CPU. This isn't well known or well documented but it is true and does work.

I'm just wondering if the same is true with ivy bridge, or is it a hard 1.575v max for ivy bridge flat out?

That was myth by the way, IIRC.
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Old 07-12-2012, 01:20 PM   #9
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That was myth by the way, IIRC.
No.. It's actually true, it's reported by many overclockers on many differnet forums, and I've used it myself on my i7 for 2.75 years and it worked perfectly fine with no issues.

This thread is not about speculating about the i7's voltage systems, it's to confirm or deny if ivy bridge works the same way.
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Old 07-12-2012, 01:29 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by kithylin View Post
No.. It's actually true, it's reported by many overclockers on many differnet forums, and I've used it myself on my i7 for 2.75 years and it worked perfectly fine with no issues.

This thread is not about speculating about the i7's voltage systems, it's to confirm or deny if ivy bridge works the same way.

I don't think you understand how one proves a concept.

Your assertion: Memory voltage must remain within 0.5V for safe operation.

Your "proof": I've run memory within 0.5V and nothing has blown up.

The problem: If memory doesn't need to be within 0.5V to remain safe, it still wouldn't blow up if within 0.5V.

You can only prove it by consistently breaking processors with values not within 0.5V. Not by not breaking processors within 0.5V.

The statement you must prove is the following: Running these two voltages greater than 0.5V apart will damage processors.
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Old 07-12-2012, 01:38 PM   #11
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I don't think you understand how one proves a concept.

Your assertion: Memory voltage must remain within 0.5V for safe operation.

Your "proof": I've run memory within 0.5V and nothing has blown up.

The problem: If memory doesn't need to be within 0.5V to remain safe, it still wouldn't blow up if within 0.5V.

You can only prove it by consistently breaking processors with values not within 0.5V. Not by not breaking processors within 0.5V.

The statement you must prove is the following: Running these two voltages greater than 0.5V apart will damage processors.
Thank you for de-railing my thread and running it off topic, again, I'm not trying to discuss I7 here, this thread is for IVY BRIDGE If you don't have anything useful to say about Ivy Bridge voltage systems, please keep your comments to yourself.
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Old 07-12-2012, 01:41 PM   #12
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I didn't know about the Performance Tuning Plan. Seems like an interesting idea.
Gave me the courage to push my 2550k to 5.6ghz(56x) just to see....Only did 2 cores just in case

Seems like a decent deal for some just in case protection to me. Some people look at is as keeping a person honest. The not so honest ones look at it as a waste of money. I got my 2550k for cheap with the microcenter facebook coupon so I figured what the hell....Takes a lot to kill a Sandy Bridge it looks like so far. I'm thinking mine would kill my motherboard before it dies an untimely death!
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Old 07-12-2012, 01:58 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by kithylin View Post
No.. It's actually true, it's reported by many overclockers on many differnet forums, and I've used it myself on my i7 for 2.75 years and it worked perfectly fine with no issues.

This thread is not about speculating about the i7's voltage systems, it's to confirm or deny if ivy bridge works the same way.

Multiple anectdotes does not become useful statistical data. One cannot "confirm or deny if ivy bridge works the same way" when "the same way" is a specious understanding of the prior generation. Provide some sort of proof for your conjecture, then we can discuss if the subsequent generations behave similarly. Otherwise, it is about as useful as discussing, since the moon is made of cheese, if other celestial bodies are as well.
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Old 07-12-2012, 02:12 PM   #14
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Multiple anectdotes does not become useful statistical data. One cannot "confirm or deny if ivy bridge works the same way" when "the same way" is a specious understanding of the prior generation. Provide some sort of proof for your conjecture, then we can discuss if the subsequent generations behave similarly. Otherwise, it is about as useful as discussing, since the moon is made of cheese, if other celestial bodies are as well.
I was just hoping originally that someone here that has experience overclocking ivy bridge could come in and confirm or deny having their ram +0.5v or so from the processor works and doesn't damage anything. A simple yes, or no, it's not a long-winded discussion about the topic.
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Old 07-12-2012, 03:52 PM   #15
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My friend has been running his 3770k at 1.65 memory volts with the 2400 trident 8 gig modules for about 2 months now. It has not fried yet.
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Old 07-12-2012, 03:54 PM   #16
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My friend has been running his 3770k at 1.65 memory volts with the 2400 trident 8 gig modules for about 2 months now. It has not fried yet.
Aha, Thank you. This is the kind of information I was hoping for
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Old 07-12-2012, 05:38 PM   #17
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Just because it doesnt fry in 2 months doesnt mean its good. Overvoltage of the memory gives a possible funny sudden death now and then. The memory controller in the CPU simply stops working. Its seen with Nehalem and onwards.
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Old 07-12-2012, 05:40 PM   #18
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There are many who have been running SB CPUs with 1.65v memory left over from past builds no problem. I don't see why Ivy would be different. I don't like high voltages, I try to stay at or under 1.5v if possible.
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Old 07-12-2012, 05:47 PM   #19
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I'm not trying to run 1.65v memory in my ivy bridge at 1.65v, this kingston HyperX ddr3 I have is rated at 1.65v but seems to be perfectly happy at either 1.5v or 1.65v. I was just wondering about how ivy bridge functions for future knowledge if and when I ever decide to overclock it.
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Old 07-12-2012, 05:58 PM   #20
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I guess if you want to be 100% confident at higher than 1.5 you should get the optional over locking warranty.
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