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Old 12-19-2011, 12:15 AM   #1
cbn
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Default Digitimes: Apple may launch new MacBook Pro with 2880 by 1800 display resolution

http://www.digitimes.com/news/a20111214PD204.html

Quote:
Apple may launch new MacBook Pro with 2880 by 1800 display resolution, say sources

Yenting Chen, Taipei; Steve Shen, DIGITIMES [Wednesday 14 December 2011]

Apple is likely to launch its new MacBook Pro lineup with a display resolution of 2880 by 1800 in the second quarter of 2012, setting a new round of competition for panel specifications in the notebook industry, according to sources in the upstream supply chain.

While the prevailing MacBook models have displays with resolutions ranging from 1680 by 1050 to 1280 by 800, the ultra-high resolution for the new MacBook Pro will further differentiate Apple's products from other brands, commented the sources.

Moving with the market demand for displays with high resolutions, Acer and Asustek Computer also plan to launch high-end Ultrabook models with a display resolution of 1920 by 1080 in the first half of 2012, compared to the 1366 by 768 displays adopted by vendors currently, said the sources.
This is believable to me....only because I keep reading other posts relating to higher pixel density (although I wonder how soon it will really come).

Anyone have an idea on why Apple is doing this? I think I remember reading this would help Apple eventually merge applications between Apple iphone and the laptop line.

Last edited by cbn; 12-19-2011 at 12:24 AM.
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Old 12-19-2011, 01:58 AM   #2
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Some more info:

http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/20...-next-year.ars

Quote:
"Retina" MacBook Pros shipping next year? It's possible
By Chris Foresman | Published 4 days ago

Apple could be ready to launch a MacBook Pro with a "Retina"-class display beginning sometime next year. A new display of unspecified size reportedly being built for Apple will have a 2880x1800 pixel resolution, according to sources speaking to DigiTimes. Although the source may seem sketchy, the claims are plausible, and such a display would be a perfect fit for Lion's little-known, resolution-doubled "HiDPI" display technology.

A 2880x1800 pixel display would have a density of about 220 pixels per inch at a 15.4" size, which is double the density of the current default 1440x900 display. Such a pixel density coincides nicely with Lion's hidden HiDPI display options, which double the number of pixels used for user interface elements. The technique is essentially identical to that used in iOS to create "Retina" graphics for the iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, and fourth-generation iPod touch. Such pixel doubling is also believed to be behind an upcoming iPad hardware revision with an expected 2048x1536 pixel 9.7" display, with a roughly 266ppi pixel density.

While 220ppi doesn't quite approach the 326ppi of the current iPhone "Retina" display, it would make the visible appearance of pixels difficult to distinguish at typical laptop viewing distances. A generally accepted standard of the resolving power of the human eye is that a person with 20/20 vision can just barely discern two distinct elements that are one arc minute (or 1/60 of a degree) apart. For a display with 220ppi, the individual pixels would disappear at about 15.6"; sitting up at a desk and typing, my face is about 16" away from the display of my MacBook Air.

The sources allegedly come from "upstream component suppliers" who suggest that Apple could release new MacBook Pro models as early as the second quarter of next year. And while DigiTimes does not have a good record for accuracy, this timeline does make it somewhat plausible. Apple is expected to have similar resolution displays ready for the iPad 3 in early spring, and the same technology would likely be used to make such a high-resolution display suitable for the MacBook Pro. Furthermore, Intel should be shipping its next-generation Ivy Bridge processors around the second quarter of next year. Apple will undoubtedly refresh its MacBook Pros to use the new processors, and its upgraded graphics are capable of driving such a high resolution display.

Apple's display resolutions for laptops have been slowly creeping upward, especially since the launch of revised MacBook Air models on October 2010. The 11" model has a pixel density of 135ppi, while the 13" model is 128dpi. A high resolution display option for the 15" MacBook Pro also checks in at 128ppi, while the 17" MacBook Pro measures 132ppi.
Microsoft may also go with "Retina Style" Displays:

http://www.macrumors.com/2011/09/13/...tina-displays/

Quote:
During a BUILD 2011 presentation, Microsoft told Windows 8 developers to plan their artwork for High DPI (dot per inch) monitors with varying artwork sizes. In particular, they mentioned Retina-class desktop and laptop monitors. @Stroughtonsmith tweeted from the talk which is not yet online:


We'd previously reported that Apple had also been planning for ultra high resolution Retina displays in Mac OS X Lion. These ultra-high resolution displays would increase the number of pixels per inch found on both laptop and desktop displays.



There's been some doubts about when such displays will become commercially available, but it seems both Apple and Microsoft have built in support for it in their latest operating systems. Microsoft seems to indicate that they will be available within the next couple of years.

Last edited by cbn; 12-19-2011 at 02:23 AM.
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Old 12-21-2011, 02:48 AM   #3
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It sure would be nice to have better screens than 1920x1200 available in the 24" format. I've had a 15.4" WUXGA panel for almost 5 years now in my laptop, yet I'm stuck with that same resolution, pretty much, on a 24" LCD.

As for what's possible, remember this article:

http://www.anandtech.com/Show/Index/...n-of-2560x1600
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Old 12-21-2011, 01:12 PM   #4
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Interesting. I had 1920x1200 on my 17" and it took time for my eyes to adjust. I think this resolution would destroy my eyeballs. However, I'm all for it.
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Old 12-21-2011, 01:30 PM   #5
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Why go with 2880x1800? Isn't that kinda oddball? Why not go with a standard like WQHD or the WQXGA standard? Keep a standard aspect ratio.
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Old 12-21-2011, 02:50 PM   #6
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ios and os x are like bastard in bred cousins. probably to make sharing of code easier between the platforms. especially with the mac app store having similar apps as iOS
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Old 12-21-2011, 04:37 PM   #7
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That is crazy. I think the text running @ 1920 x 1080 on my 15.6" laptop is already too small.
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Old 12-21-2011, 04:59 PM   #8
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It's 1440x900 doubled in both directions. This way they can use the same general software algorithms they used with the iPhone 4 display.
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Old 12-21-2011, 06:19 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bateluer View Post
Why go with 2880x1800? Isn't that kinda oddball? Why not go with a standard like WQHD or the WQXGA standard? Keep a standard aspect ratio.
It is 2x 1440x900 in each direction, so it keeps the 16:10 aspect.
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Old 12-22-2011, 07:26 AM   #10
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Excellent news. I have been using WUXGA/1080p on 15 inch laptops for 5 years now. The sharpness is something i can't go without. I am a DPI whore.

But not enough to consider buying a mac. I just hope apple don't have any filthily broad patents for a high res display and they start to act like they invented the concept.
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