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Old 07-14-2004, 04:39 PM   #1
cmai
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Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 144
Default "New Terminal" Hotkey in Redhat?

Hi all,

I'm looking for a way to automatically open a new terminal in Redhat without a mouse. I did a quick google on hotkeys for redhat but came up with nothing. Alternatively, a way that a new terminal would load upon boot would be great too. Like a batch file maybe? BTW, this is a crucial part for a project I'm doing here at work.

Thanks in advance,

cmai
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Old 07-14-2004, 07:41 PM   #2
n0cmonkey
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Default RE: "New Terminal" Hotkey in Redhat?

~/.xsession or ~/.xinitrc should be able to open one upon login.

Not sure about hotkeys though. I'm guessing that would be handled by the WM/DE.
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Old 07-14-2004, 07:50 PM   #3
eigen
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Default RE: "New Terminal" Hotkey in Redhat?

You should be able to use Ctrl-Fi 1<i<7.This work in fedora and I remeber it working in RH9
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Old 07-14-2004, 10:22 PM   #4
n0cmonkey
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Default RE: "New Terminal" Hotkey in Redhat?

Quote:
Originally posted by: eigen
You should be able to use Ctrl-Fi 1<i<7.This work in fedora and I remeber it working in RH9
For virtual terminals, but I don't think it will open new xterms. Not 100% sure that's what the OP wanted, but that's what it sounded like to me.
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Old 07-14-2004, 11:12 PM   #5
Barnaby W. Fi
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Default RE: "New Terminal" Hotkey in Redhat?

If it's a recent-ish redhat, you can just edit your gnome session to start a terminal when you log in.
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Old 07-14-2004, 11:58 PM   #6
drag
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Default "New Terminal" Hotkey in Redhat?

I know with a modern gnome desktop if you go into preferences they have a hotkey or hotbutton or something like that tool were you can assign keys and key combos to do different actions. Should be in the application/start button ---> preferences. Something like that. Pretty easy to use.

For instance on my laptop I am using Gnome 2.6 and have the "windows" key set to go to the next virtual desktop to my left, and the menu key setup to go the virtual desktop on my right. Then I have it set up so that I can hit ctrl-alt on the right side to go "fullscreen" on my applications. So that way I have a couple fullscreen'd terminals and browser windows, then move back and forth between them with the window/menu keys. (for multiple "fullscreen"'d windows (not realy fullscreen, just maximized past the task bars, and minus the window border).

There should be a hotkey selection avaible for making opening a terminal.

Of course the tool is easy, but limited in scope. Mostly for managing Gnome windows/desktop and assigning hotkeys for multimedia keyboards. If you want complex setup to use with non-native gnome apps like XMMS you're going to have to look somewere else. Also if you don't like the default browser (epiphany I think) or the default terminal (gnome-terminal), you can change it by finding the "prefered applications" tool and changing the commands to whatever you want.

Don't know for older versions of Gnome, or KDE. I didn't start using Gnome till 2.6, which is the latest. So that is what I am going off of. There are plenty of hotkey tools you can use for non-gnome stuff and more complex scripts.

If you want to have a terminal open when you log in you open up a terminal, close everything. Check the gnome-session-manager (thinks that it, I don't have my laptop aviable right now) and check to make sure that their are not any "naughty" programs that didn't close all the way. Once you check everything, close out the session manager, and go to log out. This time check the box "save session" and then log out. Log back in and it will open the terminal and any other program you had open. Don't forget to uncheck the save session next time you log out.
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Old 07-15-2004, 12:53 AM   #7
cmai
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Default RE: "New Terminal" Hotkey in Redhat?

Quote:
Originally posted by: n0cmonkey
Quote:
Originally posted by: eigen
You should be able to use Ctrl-Fi 1<i<7.This work in fedora and I remeber it working in RH9
For virtual terminals, but I don't think it will open new xterms. Not 100% sure that's what the OP wanted, but that's what it sounded like to me.
Yep I was looking to start a new xterm...sorry for the confusion. Thanks for all the help.
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