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Old 02-21-2013, 09:09 PM   #1
Throckmorton
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Default Image stabilization on a tripod --- feedback loop?

B&H says that if you turn on image stabilization with the camera mounted on a tripod it can create a "feedback loop" that damages your hardware. What the hell are they talking about? Why would the camera care if it's on a tripod or not? The sensor or lens gets moved to cancel out shake, regardless of how it's mounted. So what if the stabilization system detects its own vibrations? How is that worse from detecting shaky hands or wind or a small earthquake?

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/indepth/...d-when-turn-it

Quote:
The most basic form of image stabilization is Dual-axis image stabilization, which is designed strictly for handheld imaging and should be turned off when you mount your camera on a tripod. If you mount the camera on a tripod (or similar stable platform) without cutting the IS, you risk creating what’s called a feedback loop, in which the camera’s IS system essentially detects its own vibrations, which are picked up and amplified by the tripod, which in turn forces the camera’s IS system to work increasingly harder to quell the elevating levels of camera shake. Worst case scenario: things spin out of control and your camera ends up in the repair shop.
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Old 02-21-2013, 09:36 PM   #2
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Resonance. Just turn it off when mounting on tripod.
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Old 02-21-2013, 09:58 PM   #3
Syborg1211
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Some lenses have "tripod detection" that automatically detects if it's on a tripod and de-activates the image stabilization. Finding out which ones is the hard part though. Good to just turn it off every time, but I forget to pretty often without any ill effect that I've seen.
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Old 02-21-2013, 10:34 PM   #4
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It sounds like something may have been missed in the translation. From what I gathered, IS consumes power hence it should be OFF when using tripod, and should be OFF in Bulb mode so that IS doesn't ruin the image with trigger hold down.

According to Canon manuals my 24-105L IS, 70-200L f4 IS, and 100L macro.

http://gdlp01.c-wss.com/gds/2/030000...4lisusm-en.pdf

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Set the STABILIZER switch to OFF when you are
taking pictures using the Bulb setting (long
exposures). If the STABILIZER switch is set to ON,
the image stabilizer function may introduce errors.

When you use a tripod, the Image Stabilizer
should be turned off to save battery power.

The stabilizer is equally effective for hand-held
photography and photography with a monopod.
The 100L macro also provide.

Quote:
Using a tripod also stabilizes the image.
However, depending on the kind of tripod and
shooting conditions, sometimes it may be better
to turn off the Image Stabilizer function.
Below is the answer from Nikon.

http://support.nikonusa.com/app/answ...nses-on-tripod

Quote:
Using VR Lenses on Tripod

Answer ID 7676

| Published 11/04/2003 03:27 PM | Updated 10/21/2010 01:50 PM
When using my VR lens on a tripod, do I keep the "VR" On or Off?
The Vibration Reduction technology built into some Nikon lenses or the COOLPIX 8800 can reduce or eliminate vibration during shooting. When the camera is on a tripod there will be very little (if any) movement so the question arises if VR should be used or not.

There are two techniques when using a camera/lens mounted on a tripod; keeping the pan/tilt head loose or fluid (when panning or moving with a subject) and keeping the pan/tilt head locked down and rigid while using a cable release (time exposures or for the new HDR techniques).
With the following lenses/cameras VR should be "Off" when the camera is mounted on a tripod and the pan/tilt head is locked down and using a cable release:
  • 105mm f/2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR Micro Nikkor
  • 18-200mm f3.5-5.6 ED-IF AF-S VR DX Zoom-Nikkor
  • 24-120mm f3.5-5.6G ED-IF AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor
  • 70-200mm f2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor
  • 80-400mm f4.5-5.6D ED VR AF Zoom-Nikkor
  • 70-300mm f4.5-5.6G IF-ED AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor
  • Coolpix 8800
With the following lenses/cameras VR should be "On" when the camera is mounted on a tripod and the pan/tilt head is loose (fluid) while using the cameras shutter release button:
  • 105mm f/2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR Micro Nikkor
  • 18-200mm f3.5-5.6 ED-IF AF-S VR DX Zoom-Nikkor
  • 24-120mm f3.5-5.6G ED-IF AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor
  • 70-200mm f2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor
  • 80-400mm f4.5-5.6D ED VR AF Zoom-Nikkor
  • 70-300mm f4.5-5.6G IF-ED AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor
  • Coolpix 8800
Nikon VR technology in the following lenses can detect minute vibrations that emanate from tripod legs.With the following lenses VR can be "On" when the camera is mounted on a tripod for either technique:
  • 200-400mm f4G ED-IF AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor
  • 200mm f2G ED-IF AF-S VR Nikkor
  • 300mm f2.8G ED-IF AF-S VR Nikkor
For all lenses VR should be "On" when the camera/lens is used on a monopod.

Last edited by iGas; 02-21-2013 at 10:41 PM.
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Old 02-21-2013, 11:16 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iGas View Post
It sounds like something may have been missed in the translation. From what I gathered, IS consumes power hence it should be OFF when using tripod, and should be OFF in Bulb mode so that IS doesn't ruin the image with trigger hold down.

According to Canon manuals my 24-105L IS, 70-200L f4 IS, and 100L macro.

http://gdlp01.c-wss.com/gds/2/030000...4lisusm-en.pdf

The 100L macro also provide.

Below is the answer from Nikon.

http://support.nikonusa.com/app/answ...nses-on-tripod
Interesting! I was actually just wondering last night about use on a monopod and that last line answers my question! Thanks!
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Old 02-23-2013, 01:36 PM   #6
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Common thought is that VR shouldn't be used on a tripod because it can potentionally add vibration where otherwise there was none. It's highly unlikely to actually damage any of your gear, but it can negatively impact image quality, especially with long focal lengths.

Obviously there is some middle ground here because if vibrations are being caused by environmental conditions (a strong wind), VR could probably be used to help counter that, but its a case by case thing.
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Old 02-27-2013, 07:39 AM   #7
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I've never heard of it doing permanent damage but I've seen the effect of it on from perhaps a different perspective.

Video taken on a moving ship while the camera is on a tripod, pointed across the room will reveal movement like the camera is actually rolling back and forth. The sensors detect movement (from the ship) and are compensating. It's subtle but there.

Additionally very loud sounds like a snare drum nearby will also make the image "jump". I would ONLY use IS when the camera is handheld.
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Old 02-27-2013, 06:30 PM   #8
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it doesn't make sense. the major brand IS (Canon, Nikon) is in lens, not in body. Olympus with the OM-D is the most major interchangeable camera maker to actually offer IBIS or in body IS. which is why I love them but anyway.

how the hell would lens-based IS damage the camera like this warning says, i can't fathom. and when they say "camera's IS" again, they are only referring to a tiny bit of the market. the vast majority of IS is lens based.
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:08 PM   #9
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Is the idea that it will constantly move to compensate for its own created shaking, and cause the mechanism to overheat?
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:31 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Throckmorton View Post
Is the idea that it will constantly move to compensate for its own created shaking, and cause the mechanism to overheat?
I have shot at least 50 shots with IS On, using the 70-200L f4 IS and 5D MkII on a tripod, and both the lens and body still functioning perfectly.
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Old 02-27-2013, 09:10 PM   #11
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I find it hard to believe that the people who designed VR wouldn't even consider it a usage scenario for someone to turn their camera on and then set it down on the table or something, let alone put it on a tripod. I think the one thing about it saving battery by turning off VR makes sense and even the notion that maybe it adds a little vibration on its own could have some merit, but damaging itself just seems beyond what I would consider reasonable. Perhaps the little motors for the stabilization can wear down so turning off the VR whenever possible will help with longevity.

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Originally Posted by PixelSquish View Post
it doesn't make sense. the major brand IS (Canon, Nikon) is in lens, not in body. Olympus with the OM-D is the most major interchangeable camera maker to actually offer IBIS or in body IS. which is why I love them but anyway.

how the hell would lens-based IS damage the camera like this warning says, i can't fathom. and when they say "camera's IS" again, they are only referring to a tiny bit of the market. the vast majority of IS is lens based.
I believe most if not all Sonys do in-body stabilization, and they offered it before Olympus ever did.
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Old 02-27-2013, 09:24 PM   #12
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i work for a leading broadcast repair specialist. ill ask him tomorrow about this. i havent heard of damaged caused by IS when mounted on a tripod... so im curious now too.
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Old 02-28-2013, 01:42 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Syborg1211 View Post
I find it hard to believe that the people who designed VR wouldn't even consider it a usage scenario for someone to turn their camera on and then set it down on the table or something, let alone put it on a tripod. I think the one thing about it saving battery by turning off VR makes sense and even the notion that maybe it adds a little vibration on its own could have some merit, but damaging itself just seems beyond what I would consider reasonable. Perhaps the little motors for the stabilization can wear down so turning off the VR whenever possible will help with longevity.



I believe most if not all Sonys do in-body stabilization, and they offered it before Olympus ever did.
that's true, Sony did do that before Oly, strangely so they did not in their NEX cameras which is the main reason i waited for the OM-D when i wanted to downsize.

regardless Sony is still a small player in the dslr market, this warning is very general, which means it is speaking about the main market, which is still Canikon, who use in lens IS not IBIS.
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