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Old 01-31-2013, 09:32 PM   #1
ettescott
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Default Liquid Cooling and Peripherals

I'm wondering if liquid CPU coolers do any peripheral cooling as well. I'd imagine not, because with the fan pulling air through the radiator I would reason that there's less airflow.

I currently have an NES-PC build with a Zalman CPU air cooler that also does peripheral cooling, as well as a 80mm Noctua that pulls air off of my GPU. My current build is great, but I'm thinking about getting an unlocked processor and doing some overclocking. Even if the liquid cooler didn't provide much airflow, the 80mm kicks air around enough that peripherals would probably be fine.

As a side note, are there any liquid coolers that mount both your cpu and dGpu (with only one radiator). My CPU and GPU are so close to each other (mini itx board) that something like that would seem possible to me.

As another side note, would cooler temps mean less overall power consumption? Every watt counts with my 300w power brick.

Btw I don't have any experience with liquid cooling.

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Old 01-31-2013, 10:03 PM   #2
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I don't think any pre-built AIO coolers do both CPU and GPU, simply because there's only a handful of CPU sockets, but GPUs vary widely in where and how the processor(s) are mounted.

Besides, with even a mid-end CPU and GPU a single 120/140mm radiator wouldn't handle both, you'd be better off with air.

Regarding your original questions, it's not really any different from air coolers, you can mount the radiator as exhaust, or as intake... if you mount it close enough, it's pretty much the same as an air cooler, because... it is an air cooler it's just further from the CPU than an HSF.

Make sure your case is adequately cooled/fanned if need be.
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:56 PM   #3
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I was just looking at Zalman's thinnest closed loop cpu cooler, and at 80mm between the radiator, fan, and block, its 20mm thicker than my current 60mm CNPS8900. Even if I went with just a closed cpu loop, I don't think it would fit. I love my NES-PC but I just can't stop trying to cram more power into its little dimensions. Best computer case ever (other than grounding issues and the fact that I'll never be able to put a high end gpu into it) :-)

Last edited by ettescott; 01-31-2013 at 11:02 PM.
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Old 02-01-2013, 01:35 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ettescott View Post
As a side note, are there any liquid coolers that mount both your cpu and dGpu (with only one radiator). My CPU and GPU are so close to each other (mini itx board) that something like that would seem possible to me.
No. But you could always build a water loop. If you take through the watercooling shops you'll find what you need.
- a pump that can take a small reservoir on the top (XSPC top on a lliang DDC)
- an 80mm radiator
- cpu block
- GPU block
- Tubing - go 10/8 so it can turn in a small space as you are constrained
- Barbs or compression fittings (8 in all).

Likely cost ~$160
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Old 02-05-2013, 08:32 PM   #5
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Thanks. After realizing that a res isn't necessary (no space), I'm looking to pull the trigger and try my first WC rig. I'm having trouble finding affordable parts, though. Do these prices sound normal...

DDC pump $70
CPU/GPU block $40-60 each
Fittings $3-6 each
Single 120mm rad $30-40

Thanks! I have cash and want to spend it, but over $200 is just too much.
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Old 02-05-2013, 09:40 PM   #6
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Yeah that's about right.

Keep a close eye on "120mm" radiators though (or 80, or 140mm)... a lot of them are 123 to 125mm wide not 120, they just call it 120 because it rounds down to that and the mounting holes are in the 120mm configuration.

Tight spaces, it can be a concern.

(obviously should go without saying that they are basically never 120mm high)
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Old 02-06-2013, 10:13 AM   #7
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Quote:
Thanks. After realizing that a res isn't necessary (no space), I'm looking to pull the trigger and try my first WC rig. I'm having trouble finding affordable parts, though. Do these prices sound normal...

DDC pump $70
CPU/GPU block $40-60 each
Fittings $3-6 each
Single 120mm rad $30-40

Thanks! I have cash and want to spend it, but over $200 is just too much.
Those prices sound pretty normal. I would go with this starter kit, http://www.frozencpu.com/products/16...?tl=g30c83s137 and you pretty much have everything in here with the exception of fans and GPU block.

Also WC is a big upgrade. And make sure you have room. The biggest thing is the tubing. Sometimes you can plan it out in your head, but sometimes when you are actually tubing it, you find it out it doesn't want to go that way. What case do you have?

Rule of thumb of WC is (120mm Radiator x how many blocks) + 120mm Radiator = mm of Radiator. So if you want CPU and GPU block you would need 360mm of radiator.

Last edited by bballkenn; 02-07-2013 at 08:03 AM. Reason: Added more infor
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Old 02-06-2013, 02:16 PM   #8
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I think with his i7 S (low power) plus his low power 7750, a 120mm would be fine but it would be pushing it.
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Old 02-07-2013, 05:00 PM   #9
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The TDP of the CPU and GPU is only 110W, so I'm pretty sure I'll get results even with a single 120mm radiator. Other than the fun of putting it together, I think a custom loop could make a big difference in my GPU temps (currently 80-90 @ load).

The case is an original Nintendo. No space whatsoever, and about the poorest choice ever for WC, but I'm still thinking about it for fun. I have an AIO Zantec LQ310 that I'm using to eyeball what a custom loop might look like. I know I can get that to fit--but just barely. So my current questions are:


The rad would be almost immediately above the cpu block (rad parallel to mobo). Other than airflow, would that be an issue, ie will heat bleed from the rad back to the block and cpu, or is heat almost entirely contained within the loop?


Also, my components are all very close, so it will be a small loop, with no reservoir. Will that make a huge impact on performance?

Honestly, if my CPU temps stay the same and the GPU temps are only moderately lowered, I'll be a happy camper. I'm just hoping for the challenge!

Last edited by ettescott; 02-07-2013 at 05:35 PM.
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Old 02-08-2013, 07:31 PM   #10
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Found a link to another liquid cooled NES build that was never finished, but got pretty close, if anyone is interested.

http://www.overclock.net/t/977745/ro...cooled-nes/310
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Old 02-09-2013, 05:14 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ettescott View Post
Liquid Cooling and Peripherals
My monitor, printer, scanner and speakers never get hot enough to need cooling.
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Old 02-09-2013, 07:59 AM   #12
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Quote:
My monitor, printer, scanner and speakers never get hot enough to need cooling.
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Old 02-12-2013, 07:40 PM   #13
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Anyone out there wanna sell their black ice pro single 120mm rad? It shaves 5mm off of the newest model that I ordered and that 5mm may make a difference for me.
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