Go Back   AnandTech Forums > Hardware and Technology > CPUs and Overclocking

Forums
· Hardware and Technology
· CPUs and Overclocking
· Motherboards
· Video Cards and Graphics
· Memory and Storage
· Power Supplies
· Cases & Cooling
· SFF, Notebooks, Pre-Built/Barebones PCs
· Networking
· Peripherals
· General Hardware
· Highly Technical
· Computer Help
· Home Theater PCs
· Consumer Electronics
· Digital and Video Cameras
· Mobile Devices & Gadgets
· Audio/Video & Home Theater
· Software
· Software for Windows
· All Things Apple
· *nix Software
· Operating Systems
· Programming
· PC Gaming
· Console Gaming
· Distributed Computing
· Security
· Social
· Off Topic
· Politics and News
· Discussion Club
· Love and Relationships
· The Garage
· Health and Fitness
· Merchandise and Shopping
· For Sale/Trade
· Hot Deals with Free Stuff/Contests
· Black Friday 2014
· Forum Issues
· Technical Forum Issues
· Personal Forum Issues
· Suggestion Box
· Moderator Resources
· Moderator Discussions
   

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-27-2013, 07:47 PM   #76
Idontcare
Administrator
Elite Member
 
Idontcare's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: 台北市
Posts: 20,492
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SocketF View Post
Dude! Don't ever do that again! Don't walk into a thread and so cavalierly drop an otherwise innocously looking link only to walk away as if that was all there was to it.

I almost missed your link because it didn't look like there was much to it, but that link has lots of great nuggets of info buried inside.

Please please please next time you find great links like this include a few select quotes from it as well, use flashing lights, arrows, whatever it takes to get some attention to it

I mean look at what they have here:

Quote:
the eQuad CPU architecture, each processor core can operate as a high-performance core or a very-low-power core, depending on what’s needed at the moment. Since all the eQuad cores can adapt to the needs of the user at any given time, there’s no need for the dedicated low-power cores found in other multi-core CPU architectures. Remember, the 2.5GHz cores in the L8580 are the mobile industry’s fastest, or conversely, at 0.6V in low-power mode, the industry’s most battery-friendly.
big.Little just got one-upped right there

And what about this gem:

Quote:
The NovaThor L8580 is essentially a straight port from 28nm bulk to 28nm FD-SOI of the (very successful) NovaThor L8540, with just a bit of tweaking to fully leverage cool things you can do with FD-SOI, like biasing to increase performance and conserve power.
Quote:
For the ST-E designers, most of the IP blocks were directly re-used from the bulk design, so the porting to FD-SOI was extremely simple and fast.
Boom, testimonial evidence that supports ST's claim that porting designs from 28nm bulk to FD-SOI really are as simple as claimed.

And what about the results of the port from bulk to FD-SOI?

Quote:
For the folks designing smartphones and tablets (and ultimately for the end-user), that port to FD-SOI gets the NovaThor L8580:
  • CPUs running 35% faster and GPU and multimedia accelerators running 20% faster. In terms of multimedia performance, they’re supporting 1080p video encoding and playback at up to 60 frames per second, 1080p 3D camcorder functionality, displays up to WUXGA (1920×1200) at 60 frames per second and cameras up to 20 megapixels. (Hence their use of the descriptive “extraordinary”.)
  • 25% less power consumption than rival architectures when running at high-performance levels – think Cooler Operation.
  • A low-power mode can deliver up to 5000 DMIPS at 0.6V – more than enough computing power for the majority of applications in everyday use. A key point here is that it enables stable SRAM operation at 0.6V – have you heard of anyone matching this? The result is that this low-power mode consumes 50% less power to deliver the same performance compared with alternative solutions in bulk CMOS.
That is basically the performance and power benefits of a node shrink on its own.

Great link SocketF
Idontcare is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 08:14 PM   #77
grimpr
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 989
Default

Damn thats great info indeed! This looks like it will work wonders for AMDs chips.
grimpr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 09:22 PM   #78
mrmt
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 2,485
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Idontcare View Post
Boom, testimonial evidence that supports ST's claim that porting designs from 28nm bulk to FD-SOI really are as simple as claimed.
Something fishy here. First STM wants to pull out of the joint venture, and then I found this:

Quote:
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...165616370.html

By SVEN GRUNDBERG

Ericsson said Thursday it would write off the full value of its loss-making ST-Ericsson joint venture with STMicroelectronics NV, opting not to take full ownership after its partner said it would pull out.

(...)

The charge reflects Ericsson's best estimate of the value of its share in the venture, plus any "additional charges related to the available strategic options for the future of the ST-Ericsson assets," it said. At the end of the third quarter, Ericsson had 4.5 billion kronor worth of loans outstanding to ST-Ericsson on its balance sheet.
Ericsson wiped out the asset on its balance sheet. That's 0 recoverable value, zip, nil, nada, and nobody stepped in to take the leftovers. Too drastic for a company that had such a good IP.
mrmt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 10:51 PM   #79
Hitman928
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: AZ
Posts: 411
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmt View Post
Something fishy here. First STM wants to pull out of the joint venture, and then I found this:



Ericsson wiped out the asset on its balance sheet. That's 0 recoverable value, zip, nil, nada, and nobody stepped in to take the leftovers. Too drastic for a company that had such a good IP.
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/...8B90N520121210

The join venture has nothing to do with FD-SOI from ST from everything I've seen. Basically, ST-Ericsson has been unprofitable since its foundation and has really taken a beating as its biggest customer (Nokia) has gone down the tubes. But this is completely separate from the parent company's work on FD-SOI. It seems that ST-Ericsson is pretty much doomed but ST hasn't decided what to do with it yet and this new chip is a flagship design utilizing their parent companies best new process, probably their last push to do something big and turn a profit to stop the axe from falling. If nothing else, ST probably saw it as a chance to prove their process before letting ST-Ericsson out to pasture.
Hitman928 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-27-2013, 11:15 PM   #80
mrmt
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 2,485
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hitman928 View Post
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/...8B90N520121210

The join venture has nothing to do with FD-SOI from ST from everything I've seen.
The JV has everything to do with 28nm FDSOI. Why would you pull out of a JV if you just developed a truly competitive, disruptive product?

Just trying to be skeptical and FD-SOI might turn out what STM is saying, but I find rather strange for them to pull out now when they hit the jackpot with FDSOI.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hitman928 View Post
...and this new chip is a flagship design utilizing their parent companies best new process, probably their last push to do something big and turn a profit to stop the axe from falling.
The problem is that the sword already fell on them. STM already said they would pull out and Ericsson wrote down the entire asset, which means they are expecting 0 returns from STE. It may be a honey-trap to attract buyers.
mrmt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 12:39 AM   #81
Hitman928
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: AZ
Posts: 411
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmt View Post
The JV has everything to do with 28nm FDSOI. Why would you pull out of a JV if you just developed a truly competitive, disruptive product?

Just trying to be skeptical and FD-SOI might turn out what STM is saying, but I find rather strange for them to pull out now when they hit the jackpot with FDSOI.

The problem is that the sword already fell on them. STM already said they would pull out and Ericsson wrote down the entire asset, which means they are expecting 0 returns from STE. It may be a honey-trap to attract buyers.
The disruptive product is FD-SOI, this is developed by the parent company STM, not ST-Ericsson. STE is a join venture between STM and Ericsson and is a a wireless processor / platform developer. STE has lost money ever since coming into existence in 2009 due mainly to their main customer slipping in market share and bad margins. STM saw the writing on the wall and got out, but this does not effect their other businesses.

Like I said, most likely this is Ericsson's last attempt at making a profit before shutting it down for good (notice, the doors are still open, technically) and/or STM made a push (as no doubt there are still former STM people there) to get STE to make a "proof of concept" product for their new process.

The last paragraph is just conjecture on my part, but either way, you can't link FD-SOI to ST-Ericsson as they have nothing to do with it besides porting a product to the process.

Edit: Just as a note, I have my doubts about FD-SOI going forward as well, just because of SOI's difficulties in general over the years, but that doesn't change anything I wrote above.
Hitman928 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 05:55 AM   #82
mrmt
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 2,485
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hitman928 View Post
The last paragraph is just conjecture on my part, but either way, you can't link FD-SOI to ST-Ericsson as they have nothing to do with it besides porting a product to the process.
What I'm trying to point out, and I think the concern is valid, is that the benefits of the SOI technology are being touted by an undead JV and its parent company, we have no independent means to verify SOI claims, not only about performance but on ease of manufacturing and costs too.

And if FD-SOI claims are true then STE has a winning horse on its hands and why would you sell your race ticket now that your horse will be ahead of the pack in the next curve? Sure, I can still think of a few scenarios where both STM and Ericsson would want to pull out regardless of how good STE chips were, but I also can think in a scenario where spectacular claims are made in order to attract buyers. When both parts in the JV declared their intention of pulling out and one of them wrote off the entire stake, it's advisable to take those claims with sizable quantities of salt.
mrmt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 11:36 AM   #83
Ajay
Platinum Member
 
Ajay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: NH, USA
Posts: 2,129
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmt

What some AMD fans must accept is that the company isn't trying to pull out a miracle they are waiting, but is trying to develop new products to pay the bills, and those new products won't be enthusiasts products.
I don't expect an enthusiast big core product, I think AMD is committed to two big core products; APUs (Kavari) and Opterons (which will need >> 4 modules) and will not be suited to desktop usage.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmt View Post
What I'm trying to point out, and I think the concern is valid, is that the benefits of the SOI technology are being touted by an undead JV and its parent company, we have no independent means to verify SOI claims, not only about performance but on ease of manufacturing and costs too.
I think there is enough R&D evidence that the performance and power improvements are real. I think what needs to be proven is the ease of porting bulk-SI to FD-SOI and whether or not it is cost effective in a high volume production environment.

STM has some sort of contract with GF. If I had to guess, it's to prove the later item on GF equipment, but I haven't seen any details of the deal and don't expect to unless it's a success.
__________________
Asus P6T V2 Deluxe Ci7 970 @ 4.2GHz w/HT, Corsair H100i, 2x240GB SanDisk Extreme RAID0, 2x WD VR 300GB RAID0, MSI GTX 680 PE @ 1110MHz, 12GB G.Skill Riojaws DDR3 1600, Corair 850HX, Corsair 800D case. Win7 x64 Ultimate. Dell U2412M.
Heatware

Last edited by Ajay; 01-28-2013 at 01:29 PM.
Ajay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 12:50 PM   #84
Idontcare
Administrator
Elite Member
 
Idontcare's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: 台北市
Posts: 20,492
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ajay View Post
STM has some sort of contract with GF. If I had to guess, it's to prove the later item on GF equipment, but I haven't seen ant details of the deal and don't expect to unless it's a success.
My process technology background and experience with SOI compels me to be suspicious of ST's claims...but it costs me nothing to take them at their word until proven otherwise.

That said, perhaps what is more telling here is what is not being said (and who is electing to not say anything).

Global Foundries is central to all of this, and no foundry shies away from the opportunity to sing their own praises when it comes to process technology capability and timeline. In fact, if anything they over-sell their capability and over-hype their timeline to such an extent that the reader usually builds in an expected "reality factor" to the foundry's press releases.

As ST would tell it, their 28nm FDSOI is the MOAN (mother of all nodes).

And yet we don't see GloFo beating down the door with press releases vaunting their newly implemented "TSMC killer" technology.
Idontcare is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 01:35 PM   #85
Ajay
Platinum Member
 
Ajay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: NH, USA
Posts: 2,129
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Idontcare View Post
My process technology background and experience with SOI compels me to be suspicious of ST's claims...but it costs me nothing to take them at their word until proven otherwise.

That said, perhaps what is more telling here is what is not being said (and who is electing to not say anything).

Global Foundries is central to all of this, and no foundry shies away from the opportunity to sing their own praises when it comes to process technology capability and timeline. In fact, if anything they over-sell their capability and over-hype their timeline to such an extent that the reader usually builds in an expected "reality factor" to the foundry's press releases.

As ST would tell it, their 28nm FDSOI is the MOAN (mother of all nodes).

And yet we don't see GloFo beating down the door with press releases vaunting their newly implemented "TSMC killer" technology.
Then it would appear, that ST-Micro's claim that if GF started the conversion in February, then GF would be able to start producing wafers sometime in 4Q13 is something that GF isn't comfortable with yet. Otherwise, I agree - GloFo would be screaming the benefits of FD-SOI from the rooftops. The proof of the pudding is in the eating!
__________________
Asus P6T V2 Deluxe Ci7 970 @ 4.2GHz w/HT, Corsair H100i, 2x240GB SanDisk Extreme RAID0, 2x WD VR 300GB RAID0, MSI GTX 680 PE @ 1110MHz, 12GB G.Skill Riojaws DDR3 1600, Corair 850HX, Corsair 800D case. Win7 x64 Ultimate. Dell U2412M.
Heatware
Ajay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 05:53 PM   #86
SocketF
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 235
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hitman928 View Post
Basically, ST-Ericsson has been unprofitable since its foundation and has really taken a beating as its biggest customer (Nokia) has gone down the tubes.
Yes and furthermore there is a general trend that all the mobile devices' manufacturers are making their own SOC. Most prominent example: Apple.

Thus pure SoC-makers like STE are not profitable. Even Texas Instruments canned their OMAP SoCs.

So all in all it may and like a sad story. Best technology but maybe soon no chip. However, I hope that the STE SoC will be used at least in one mobile phone. There should be some L8540 designs around that should be easily upgradeable. (Haven't checked though).


@Idontcare:
I will try next time ^^
It just didn't give much credit because it is nothing new to me, I follow FD-SOI since December and was anticipating the demo of the L8580. STM already stated during the SOI consortium meeting in the mid of December all the now proven facts about STE's SoC@FD-SOI.

In case the PDFs were not linked previously, lots of up-to-date FD-SOI presentations below:
http://www.soiconsortium.org/fully-d...december-2012/

I hope that was clear enough ;-)

To the FD-SOI skeptics:
I also doubt any information of a company about its own products but now we have proof with the L8580. Only thing that could still be fishy are yields. But a sincere FD-SOI customer should be able to get that information. Furthermore the promised (general) information is that FD-SOI yields are better due to less usage of dopants. Everything looks really tooooo good to be true. Just imagine what that could do to an APU. You could bias the CPU-part for high-clocks and the GPU-part for low-leakage. That's exactly the "holy-grail" of APU-manufacturing that AMD was looking for since the Llano disaster. And then that process will be even a bit cheaper ... ridiculous.

I am searching for a catch since several weeks .. but it is really hard to find.
SocketF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 06:14 PM   #87
SiliconWars
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 2,348
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SocketF View Post
To the FD-SOI skeptics:
I also doubt any information of a company about its own products but now we have proof with the L8580. Only thing that could still be fishy are yields. But a sincere FD-SOI customer should be able to get that information. Furthermore the promised (general) information is that FD-SOI yields are better due to less usage of dopants. Everything looks really tooooo good to be true. Just imagine what that could do to an APU. You could bias the CPU-part for high-clocks and the GPU-part for low-leakage. That's exactly the "holy-grail" of APU-manufacturing that AMD was looking for since the Llano disaster. And then that process will be even a bit cheaper ... ridiculous.

I am searching for a catch since several weeks .. but it is really hard to find.
AMD need to stop chasing the holy grail and just actually do the (relatively) easy things right.

Intel's process lead is overstated. As you mentioned earlier, yield and cost is the great equaliser. AMD has a history of making incredible improvements on the same process, far ahead of anything intel has ever done, because intel is basically in a hurry to abandon the current process and move to the next smaller one.

FD-SOI should be an interesting talking point for AMD's top echelon's (at 20nm) but they simply don't have the money left to go chasing the holy grail any more.
__________________
Main system - i5 2500K, Radeon HD 7850 OC
HTPC - ASRock E350-M1, Radeon HD 6310D
SiliconWars is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-28-2013, 06:38 PM   #88
Idontcare
Administrator
Elite Member
 
Idontcare's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: 台北市
Posts: 20,492
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SocketF View Post
Yes and furthermore there is a general trend that all the mobile devices' manufacturers are making their own SOC. Most prominent example: Apple.

Thus pure SoC-makers like STE are not profitable. Even Texas Instruments canned their OMAP SoCs.

So all in all it may and like a sad story. Best technology but maybe soon no chip. However, I hope that the STE SoC will be used at least in one mobile phone. There should be some L8540 designs around that should be easily upgradeable. (Haven't checked though).


@Idontcare:
I will try next time ^^
It just didn't give much credit because it is nothing new to me, I follow FD-SOI since December and was anticipating the demo of the L8580. STM already stated during the SOI consortium meeting in the mid of December all the now proven facts about STE's SoC@FD-SOI.

In case the PDFs were not linked previously, lots of up-to-date FD-SOI presentations below:
http://www.soiconsortium.org/fully-d...december-2012/

I hope that was clear enough ;-)

To the FD-SOI skeptics:
I also doubt any information of a company about its own products but now we have proof with the L8580. Only thing that could still be fishy are yields. But a sincere FD-SOI customer should be able to get that information. Furthermore the promised (general) information is that FD-SOI yields are better due to less usage of dopants. Everything looks really tooooo good to be true. Just imagine what that could do to an APU. You could bias the CPU-part for high-clocks and the GPU-part for low-leakage. That's exactly the "holy-grail" of APU-manufacturing that AMD was looking for since the Llano disaster. And then that process will be even a bit cheaper ... ridiculous.

I am searching for a catch since several weeks .. but it is really hard to find.
I like

On the topic of the back bias, I thought that had to be applied to the entire IC, it is not possible to just apply it to select regions dynamically. Is this true?
Idontcare is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2013, 03:08 AM   #89
SocketF
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 235
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eyefinity View Post
AMD need to stop chasing the holy grail and just actually do the (relatively) easy things right.
They don't need to chase, FD-SOI *is* the holy grail and it is available @GF soon. It really sounds too good to be true.

Quote:
FD-SOI should be an interesting talking point for AMD's top echelon's (at 20nm) but they simply don't have the money left to go chasing the holy grail any more.
There won't be any 20nm FD-SOI node STM just canned it in last December (check the PDFs from my last link, there you can see the new roadmaps). I guess it has something to do with GF's decision to launch their 14XM process ( which uses the back-end of 20nm) just 1y after their 20nm bulk process. FD-SOI normally is also planned to be available some time after the bulk process, too, thus I assume that they decided to wait a few months more to be able to use the 14nm "XM"-node.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Idontcare View Post
On the topic of the back bias, I thought that had to be applied to the entire IC, it is not possible to just apply it to select regions dynamically. Is this true?
I am no expert in this field but I don't see any difference to the current situation of having different voltage planes for the GPU/CPU/Uncore parts. These voltages are the transistor's gate voltages. If it is possible to have several voltage planes for the gate voltage, why should it be impossible to have several planes for the bias-voltage, too?

However I did not find proof, only something for a special type of transistors from SuVolta:
Quote:
Finally, dynamic body bias can be used to optimize the
performance and power of the product during operation. This
ability is particularly important in complex system-on-a-chip
(SOC) products that have a multitude of circuit blocks with
different performance and power requirements during system
operation. Dynamic body bias can be used to raise the
threshold voltage and reduce power consumption in a block
during periods when performance is not critical or a standby
mode is possible, or to lower threshold voltage and increase
performance in a block when maximum performance is needed.
This ability to optimize with dynamic body bias allows the
designer to use a large number of low-Vt transistors to enhance
maximum performance because leakage can be dialed back
when lower performance is acceptable.
http://www.suvolta.com/index.php/dow...le/view/40/77/

Sounds like what we want, but I am not 100% sure if that is also valid for the back bias in FD-SOI transistors.
SocketF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2013, 05:34 AM   #90
ShintaiDK
Lifer
 
ShintaiDK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Copenhagen
Posts: 11,123
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Idontcare View Post
big.Little just got one-upped right there
It was pretty obvious it would happen, even tho we already had alot of people cheering for big.LITTLE already. Also shows ARMs position as a core designer.

I wonder if Qualcomm will follow suit, leaving Samsung and ARM alone on the big.LITTLE
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idontcare
Competition is good at driving the pace of innovation, but it is an inefficient mechanism (R&D expenditures summed across a given industry) for generating the innovation.
ShintaiDK is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2013, 05:58 AM   #91
simboss
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 24
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShintaiDK View Post
It was pretty obvious it would happen, even tho we already had alot of people cheering for big.LITTLE already. Also shows ARMs position as a core designer.

I wonder if Qualcomm will follow suit, leaving Samsung and ARM alone on the big.LITTLE
I do not really see why you could not combine the 2 technologies to work together.
It would give you an even better dynamic range of performance or power efficiency. Obviously it would increase the system complexity to handle the different possible combinations, but once you have a big.LITTLE working, it should not be that hard.
simboss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2013, 06:09 AM   #92
NTMBK
Diamond Member
 
NTMBK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 4,594
Default

Wow, 28 FD-SOI sounds seriously tasty. I very much hope that GloFo will get it as quickly as they say- Jaguar ported onto that could be very nice.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maximilian View Post
I like my VRMs how I like my hookers, hot and Taiwanese.
NTMBK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2013, 06:29 AM   #93
ShintaiDK
Lifer
 
ShintaiDK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Copenhagen
Posts: 11,123
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NTMBK View Post
Wow, 28 FD-SOI sounds seriously tasty. I very much hope that GloFo will get it as quickly as they say- Jaguar ported onto that could be very nice.
Well...first product seems to be out in 2014 if it enters the fab in Q4 2013. Plus I bet this is LP only. I am quite sure Jaguar will use a HP process.

But lets see in a year what comes out.
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idontcare
Competition is good at driving the pace of innovation, but it is an inefficient mechanism (R&D expenditures summed across a given industry) for generating the innovation.

Last edited by ShintaiDK; 01-29-2013 at 06:34 AM.
ShintaiDK is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2013, 07:06 AM   #94
Idontcare
Administrator
Elite Member
 
Idontcare's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: 台北市
Posts: 20,492
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SocketF View Post
I am no expert in this field but I don't see any difference to the current situation of having different voltage planes for the GPU/CPU/Uncore parts. These voltages are the transistor's gate voltages. If it is possible to have several voltage planes for the gate voltage, why should it be impossible to have several planes for the bias-voltage, too?
We used body-biasing at TI as well, the difference between back-bias and what you are thinking of in terms of power-planes is that the back-bias applied to the substrate cannot be electrically isolated and partitioned...it applies to the entire substrate (die) all at once.

The power planes on the active side of the die can be partitioned and electrically isolated as a matter of straightforward patterning and isolation techniques when forming the transistors themselves. No such processing occurs on the backside of the die.

Back biasing is basically turning the entire substrate into a controlled capacitor (like a MIMCAP). To have regions of the substrate biased at one voltage, and other regions biased at another voltage, would require electrical isolation between those regions. That is no feasible with today's process technology.

It would be possible if the substrates were MCM'ed. One die for the cores and one die for the iGPU, then each die could be independentally biased with a different back-bias voltage because the two die would be electrically isolated from each other.

That is what I understand of the technology. But maybe ST has figured out a way around this as well?

Quote:
Originally Posted by simboss View Post
I do not really see why you could not combine the 2 technologies to work together.
It would give you an even better dynamic range of performance or power efficiency. Obviously it would increase the system complexity to handle the different possible combinations, but once you have a big.LITTLE working, it should not be that hard.
It isn't that they can't be combined, it is that combining them would be superfluous at that point.

big.Little elevates production cost because it makes the die larger than it otherwise would be. If your process tech allows the power to scale over a wider range then your reward for that more robust process tech window is the ability to have smaller and less complicated die. Validation improves, yields improve, die per wafer improves, production costs go down.

You could take a step back from that and still do big.LITTLE, but ideally you'd like to not have to.
Idontcare is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2013, 07:18 AM   #95
SocketF
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 235
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShintaiDK View Post
Well...first product seems to be out in 2014 if it enters the fab in Q4 2013. Plus I bet this is LP only. I am quite sure Jaguar will use a HP process.
Yes it is based on the 28nm LP-libraries from the IBM/GF consortium, but with FD-SOI that LP process nearly scales as high as the HP version - just with much less leakage.

Don't forget that the demoed STE SoC can clock up to 2.5/2.8 Ghz. That is just a Cortex-A9, i.e. it just has a 8 stage pipeline. Jaguar with 14 stages should be easily able to run at much higher clocks.

More on the LP-HP-FD-SOI differences here:

http://blog.stericsson.com/blog/2012...vathor-part-1/

http://blog.stericsson.com/blog/2012...0%93-part-2-2/

Edit:
@Idontcare:
Ah ok, then if it is really the whole substrate then it wont work No clue if they have found a way around it, I doubt it, and 2 dies would be "stupid", too, we had that previously e.g. intel did it, and the interconnect between those dies will be a bottleneck. The only other thing they promoted was the integration of FD-SOI and bulk transistors on the same die. In that case you just remove that "precious" thin SOI layer and work on it like on a normal bulk die. But then I guess the back-bias wont improve either.

OK then finally at least one feature that is really toooo good to be true ^^

Last edited by SocketF; 01-29-2013 at 07:23 AM.
SocketF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2013, 07:25 AM   #96
simboss
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 24
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Idontcare View Post

It isn't that they can't be combined, it is that combining them would be superfluous at that point.

big.Little elevates production cost because it makes the die larger than it otherwise would be. If your process tech allows the power to scale over a wider range then your reward for that more robust process tech window is the ability to have smaller and less complicated die. Validation improves, yields improve, die per wafer improves, production costs go down.

You could take a step back from that and still do big.LITTLE, but ideally you'd like to not have to.
Combining the 2 technologies would still give you a larger range of performance/power efficiency, wouldn't it?
An A7 running at 0.65V would still consume much less than an A15, right? The question here is obviously how much less? And is the difference worth the effort.
and the A15 should be able to clock higher, so you are gaining on the high performance as well.


Given the fact that the bL chips are already here and that the port to FD-SOI is (supposed to be?) straightforward, the added complexity does not seem like a non-starter.

Yes it would cost more, as it would cost more to move to a more advanced node, or to design a new core.
simboss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2013, 08:26 AM   #97
piesquared
Golden Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,076
Default

It's interesting that Sony, ST-Ericsson and STMicroelectronics have joined the HSA foundation (no announcements made yet though). Wow, there are some huge names joining up and still one founding member to be named. Microsoft?

http://www.fudzilla.com/home/item/30...w-more-members

http://hsafoundation.com/

Last edited by piesquared; 01-29-2013 at 08:50 AM.
piesquared is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2013, 08:53 AM   #98
SocketF
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 235
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by simboss View Post
Combining the 2 technologies would still give you a larger range of performance/power efficiency, wouldn't it?
An A7 running at 0.65V would still consume much less than an A15, right? The question here is obviously how much less? And is the difference worth the effort.
Probably not. You forgot that STE uses the A9. Smaller than the A15, also less IPC, but you can compensate by a higher clock for the A9@FD-SOI part.
Compared to the A7 it is a much better performer due to In-Order <> OoOrder-Execution.
Surely an A15@FD-SOI would again have a higher performance but I don't think that it is worth it to have 2 additional A7 on the die. It justs complicates the whole design. Two A9s are the golden middle. Easy design, low die size, high clocks and low clocks, cheap price, perfect.

A big+Little chip might be slightly better, but I don't want to pay the extra price for the bigger die.

However, I can see the market for it in expensive "bling bling phones" ^^
Some people might pay lots of $ for it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by piesquared View Post
It's interesting that Sony, ST-Ericsson and STMicroelectronics have joined the HSA foundation (no announcements made yet though). Wow, there are some huge names joining up and still one founding member to be named. Microsoft?
Interesting but you are in the wrong thread. There is no direct connection to FD-SOI. If there is no other HSA-Thread feel free to open one, it is an important topic.
SocketF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2013, 09:03 AM   #99
piesquared
Golden Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 1,076
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SocketF View Post


Interesting but you are in the wrong thread. There is no direct connection to FD-SOI. If there is no other HSA-Thread feel free to open one, it is an important topic.
It's related to ST. No harm no foul.
piesquared is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2013, 12:07 PM   #100
Ajay
Platinum Member
 
Ajay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: NH, USA
Posts: 2,129
Default

Hmm, right now STM only has a Memorandum of Understand with GF. IDK, what does this typically mean in the foundry business?

Latest STM & GF news Item that I could find.
__________________
Asus P6T V2 Deluxe Ci7 970 @ 4.2GHz w/HT, Corsair H100i, 2x240GB SanDisk Extreme RAID0, 2x WD VR 300GB RAID0, MSI GTX 680 PE @ 1110MHz, 12GB G.Skill Riojaws DDR3 1600, Corair 850HX, Corsair 800D case. Win7 x64 Ultimate. Dell U2412M.
Heatware
Ajay is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.