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Old 12-17-2012, 08:48 AM   #1
Razersoda
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Default ~10cm from the wall

So after googling and searching all over the place I have not found an answer yet.

My computer is on a table, the backside of the computer is about 10cm (4inches) from the wall. Does this affect the cooling negatively or is it just fine?

Thanks, Razersoda

Edit: The same question goes to the PSU. Does it affect the temperature of the PSU ?
Edit2: What about ~20cm (8inches) ?

Last edited by Razersoda; 12-17-2012 at 08:53 AM.
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Old 12-17-2012, 09:02 AM   #2
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That should be fine. As long as there is room in the back, the air will vent out. In fact, at 10cm, you might even have enough room to consider using a back fan as an intake, if it works for your cooling.

What's important to realize is that your fans, more than anything else, will dictacte the cooling of your case. Work with positive pressure and make sure there is room around each fan to take in air. If you really want to find out, try and generate smoke (using dry ice or a similar, non-cigarette method), and see how air is flowing.

Also, make sure that your PSU is taking in the coolest air possible. If you have a bottom vent, have the PSU fan be at the bottom. Otherwise, make sure the fan is facing in the inside of the case.
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Old 12-17-2012, 09:19 AM   #3
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eureka View Post
That should be fine. As long as there is room in the back, the air will vent out. In fact, at 10cm, you might even have enough room to consider using a back fan as an intake, if it works for your cooling.

What's important to realize is that your fans, more than anything else, will dictate the cooling of your case. Work with positive pressure and make sure there is room around each fan to take in air. If you really want to find out, try and generate smoke (using dry ice or a similar, non-cigarette method), and see how air is flowing.

Also, make sure that your PSU is taking in the coolest air possible. If you have a bottom vent, have the PSU fan be at the bottom. Otherwise, make sure the fan is facing in the inside of the case.
Thank you. Another fast question here: Which fan should be the intake and the exhaust for my build? I have a fan in front and behind. Currently both of the fans intake air. It is setup like this because the front fan was already there like this with the case and the rear fans instructions said it to put it like this. Is this right ?

Edit: It actually makes sense to flip the rear fan so the hot air could get out. Why did the instructions tell me otherwise?

Annother question appears: Does it matter if the airflow is from the front to the back or vice versa?

Last edited by Razersoda; 12-17-2012 at 09:23 AM.
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Old 12-17-2012, 09:45 AM   #4
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The answer is, it really really depends on your setup.

Are you using a heatsink fan or an AIO water cooler? Assuming you have a heatsink fan, you just want a single air channel. You want it to take in air from the front, funnel it through the heatsink fan, and then out the back. You don't want a rear intake because then it's fighting the warm air coming out of the heatsink fan.

It may make sense, if you have a top fan, to use it as an intake, as long as it is filtered, for positive air pressure to keep dust out of your case.

If you are using an AIO water cooler, which is hooked up to the rear, it may make sense to have it as an intake, to get cooler air from the back. Use the top as an exhaust in this case.

So, it really depends on what you have inside the case, and none of these are laws. Play around and test your temperatures with intel burn test to see which one stays the coolest.
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Old 12-17-2012, 09:47 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Eureka View Post
The answer is, it really really depends on your setup.

Are you using a heatsink fan or an AIO water cooler? Assuming you have a heatsink fan, you just want a single air channel. You want it to take in air from the front, funnel it through the heatsink fan, and then out the back. You don't want a rear intake because then it's fighting the warm air coming out of the heatsink fan.

It may make sense, if you have a top fan, to use it as an intake, as long as it is filtered, for positive air pressure to keep dust out of your case.

If you are using an AIO water cooler, which is hooked up to the rear, it may make sense to have it as an intake, to get cooler air from the back. Use the top as an exhaust in this case.

So, it really depends on what you have inside the case, and none of these are laws. Play around and test your temperatures with intel burn test to see which one stays the coolest.
Thank you. /lock please
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