Go Back   AnandTech Forums > Consumer Electronics > Digital and Video Cameras

Forums
· Hardware and Technology
· CPUs and Overclocking
· Motherboards
· Video Cards and Graphics
· Memory and Storage
· Power Supplies
· Cases & Cooling
· SFF, Notebooks, Pre-Built/Barebones PCs
· Networking
· Peripherals
· General Hardware
· Highly Technical
· Computer Help
· Home Theater PCs
· Consumer Electronics
· Digital and Video Cameras
· Mobile Devices & Gadgets
· Audio/Video & Home Theater
· Software
· Software for Windows
· All Things Apple
· *nix Software
· Operating Systems
· Programming
· PC Gaming
· Console Gaming
· Distributed Computing
· Security
· Social
· Off Topic
· Politics and News
· Discussion Club
· Love and Relationships
· The Garage
· Health and Fitness
· Merchandise and Shopping
· For Sale/Trade
· Hot Deals
· Free Stuff
· Contests and Sweepstakes
· Black Friday 2013
· Forum Issues
· Technical Forum Issues
· Personal Forum Issues
· Suggestion Box
· Moderator Resources
· Moderator Discussions
   

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 11-26-2012, 07:23 PM   #1
acuriousman
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7
Default How to get rid of glare?

I have a lamp that I use to light my video shoots. It has 4 bulbs on it that are able to move/flex in any direction. The trouble is, I have to bring these bulbs REALLY close to my camera to get decent exposure. This creates a lot of nasty glare from the bulbs on the item I'm shooting. It might look fine one second, but if I tilt or turn the item, tons of glare pops in.
Which is HORRIBLE for video.

Example of the glare.



My lamp:



Any idea how I can fix this?

Thank you for reading.
acuriousman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2012, 09:03 PM   #2
kbp
Senior Member
 
kbp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Northern Lower Peninsula
Posts: 568
Default

Try the lights at a 90 degree angle.
For "sun" shots I use a circular polorizer, but thats outside.
__________________

kbp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2012, 09:37 PM   #3
corkyg
Moderator
Peripherals
 
corkyg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Tucson, Arizona
Posts: 23,780
Default

Change the angle so that the light is indirect.
__________________
CorkyG - Tucson, AZ

In my view you cannot claim to have seen something until you have photographed it.... Emile Zola
corkyg is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2012, 10:21 PM   #4
acuriousman
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by corkyg View Post
Change the angle so that the light is indirect.
I tried aiming it at the wall but now the light is too dim.
acuriousman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2012, 10:51 PM   #5
harobikes333
Platinum Member
 
harobikes333's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,261
Default

Buy better lights :?
__________________
Check out my personal website ? Daily-Pages
harobikes333 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2012, 11:00 PM   #6
acuriousman
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by harobikes333 View Post
Buy better lights :?

Somebody mentioned a softbox. Would that help with the massive glare orb?
acuriousman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2012, 11:53 PM   #7
randomrogue
Diamond Member
 
randomrogue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 5,462
Default

It will diffuse the light. Put a sheet over your light fixture and try it out.
randomrogue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2012, 07:38 AM   #8
twistedlogic
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 605
Default

Try using just one bigger bulb. By the size of the bulbs, it looks like your using the lower wattage CFLs. With only one light source, there is less chance of reflection.

Also diffuse the light, but this will eat some of the light. As you mentioned, a light tent.
twistedlogic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2012, 11:17 AM   #9
ElFenix
Super Moderator
Off Topic
 
ElFenix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Posts: 93,757
Default

a sheet of white copy paper in front of a bright enough bulb will work just fine. i've had good results with a 150 watt equivalent CF.
__________________
I killed and ate the Fun Mod with some jellybeans and a little Chianti.

AnandTech Mean Moderator
ElFenix is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2012, 11:44 AM   #10
acuriousman
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedlogic View Post
Try using just one bigger bulb. By the size of the bulbs, it looks like your using the lower wattage CFLs. With only one light source, there is less chance of reflection.

Also diffuse the light, but this will eat some of the light. As you mentioned, a light tent.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElFenix View Post
a sheet of white copy paper in front of a bright enough bulb will work just fine. i've had good results with a 150 watt equivalent CF.
I tried that with my bulbs but the light was too dim.
So I should get a 150 watt bulb? Should I also get a softbox lighting kit?

Does anybody here have recommendations for either?

Thank you for all your help so far by the way.
acuriousman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2012, 01:44 PM   #11
bigi
Golden Member
 
bigi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Posts: 1,385
Default

Diffuse the light, there are endless ways of doing so - piece of paper, softbox, piece of white plastics, etc.
__________________
"I'm sick of being so healthy" - H.Simpson
bigi is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2012, 02:17 PM   #12
JohnnyRebel
Senior Member
 
JohnnyRebel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Heart of Dixie
Posts: 736
Default

Here is a $60 solution w/ free shipping from Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/Cowboystudio-P...pd_sim_sbs_p_2

A bit better for $93 shipped

http://www.amazon.com/CowboyStudio-P...47673&sr=1-186

Last edited by JohnnyRebel; 11-28-2012 at 07:50 AM.
JohnnyRebel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2012, 07:34 PM   #13
acuriousman
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigi View Post
Diffuse the light, there are endless ways of doing so - piece of paper, softbox, piece of white plastics, etc.
Tell me more about the softbox. How big would it have to be to eliminate all glare?
Do you have any recommendations for models?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnnyRebel View Post
Here is a $60 solution w/ free shipping from Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/Cowboystudio-P...=cowboy+studio

A bit better for $93 shipped

http://www.amazon.com/CowboyStudio-P...47673&sr=1-186
Your links seem to be broken.
acuriousman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2012, 12:09 AM   #14
slashbinslashbash
Golden Member
 
slashbinslashbash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,672
Default

All that a softbox is, is a piece of white nylon fabric held in front of the bulb, with a reflective-lined box surrounding the bulb and attaching to the fabric. You could easily make one out of a cardboard box, some white nylon, and aluminum foil. You could probably even make it fit over your existing light fixture. White foamboard is also a good material for softboxes: http://thehowzone.com/how/Photo-Softbox/2

As for how big it needs to be, it depends on your subject. Ideally it needs to be as big as, or bigger than, your subject. So if you are lighting a human torso and face then it needs to be like 2'x3'. If you are just doing tabletop reviews of consumer products then probably 1'x2' would cover most things. Getting it as close as possible to the subject (to increase its relative size) is also important. You want it just outside of the camera's view.

Basically the idea is to create a large, diffuse light source, instead of a small, direct light source. This is the same principle behind lampshades. A large, diffuse source creates nice, even, "soft" light that is less likely to glare (although with a reflective surface like that Sony box, it would be hard to eliminate completely when held at the wrong angle).

I wouldn't shell out a bunch of money on a softbox; definitely play with a few home-made solutions first, because IMO you probably won't be able to get rid of the glare completely, but you can make it less likely to happen and less visually jarring when it does happen.
__________________
MacBook Pro|2.2GHz Quad-Core i7|Radeon 6750 1GB|16GB|750GB|Parallels|Win7HP
Mac Pro|2xXeon 5150|12GB|128GB 840 + 2x1.5TB|Radeon 5770|Dell 2407WFP+2007FP
ASUS P5B|E6550|2GB|1.5TB|Radeon 280X|Win7HP
Canon 5D|40D|17-40L|24-105L|70-200L|50/1.4|85/1.8|100/2.8 Macro|580EX|430EX|AlienBees

The Left is not merely gauche; it is downright sinister.
slashbinslashbash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2012, 07:49 AM   #15
JohnnyRebel
Senior Member
 
JohnnyRebel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Heart of Dixie
Posts: 736
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by acuriousman View Post
Your links seem to be broken.
Fixed. Also check out the "Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed..." section for a ton of other similar priced options.
JohnnyRebel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2012, 08:38 AM   #16
twistedlogic
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 605
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by acuriousman View Post
I tried that with my bulbs but the light was too dim.
So I should get a 150 watt bulb?
They are 150watt equivalent, which would be 42W CFL. The ones you are using appear to be only 13 watt, judging from their size. They also have (200W equivalent) 55W CFL's at my local Walmart, a huge bulb.

Quote:
Originally Posted by acuriousman View Post
Should I also get a softbox lighting kit?
It wouldn't hurt to try. It also allows for a seamless background. By default CFL's are diffused but are still a small light sources. A softbox is simple to make, just use a cardboard box and some white paper.

But no matter what you try, you will get reflections from a shiny object at certain angles. With a bigger light source, they are less distracting.
twistedlogic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2012, 03:01 PM   #17
radhak
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Miami, FL
Posts: 561
Default

You have got good advice till now.

The two ingredients of a soft-box is (a) seamless background (b) diffused lighting.

You could create the first at home with a bed-sheet or a long sheet of paper (depending on how big your subject of photography is).

For the latter (diffused light source), most lamps are not 'big enough' in size, so you will need to put a barrier between the light and the subject to diffuse the light emitted, creating the effect of a large light source.

This barrier could be anything from a pane of glass to a sheet of paper, in gradation of increasing opacity. The pane of glass may not diffuse enough, while the paper might diffuse too much (giving you 'insufficient light'). In between these extremes you could use other stuff as suggested above, like a plastic panel from HomeDepot (I've done that with good results), or even a sheet of cloth (silk / cotton/ etc) from the fabric center at Walmart. You could experiment with stuff at home before buying much.
__________________
Nikon D90/ 17-50mm F2.8/ 70-300mm /35mm F1.8 / 50mm F1.8 / SB600 / SB400 /
radhak is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:21 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.